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Central catheters thrombosis

Silvia Calviño Günther, Carole Schwebel, Rebecca Hamidfar-Roy, Agnès Bonadona, Maxime Lugosi, Claire Ara-Somohano, Clémence Minet, Leïla Potton, Jean-Charles Cartier, Aurelien Vésin, Magalie Chautemps, Lenka Styfalova, Stephane Ruckly, Jean-François Timsit
PURPOSE: To describe all post-insertion complications involving most used intravascular access, and to determine whether the use of a new-generation transparent dressing (3M™ IV Advanced) might reduce their number and impact on ICU patient outcomes. METHODS: Patients older than 18, with an expected length of stay ≥48 h and requiring at least one central venous catheter (CVC), arterial catheter (AC), haemodialysis catheter (HDC), pulmonary arterial catheters (PAC) or peripheral venous catheter (PVC) were randomized into two groups: a new-generation transparent dressing, or the hospital's classical transparent dressing, and were followed daily for any infectious and non-infectious complications...
October 12, 2016: Intensive Care Medicine
Dominique Farge, Henri Bounameaux, Benjamin Brenner, Francis Cajfinger, Philippe Debourdeau, Alok A Khorana, Ingrid Pabinger, Susan Solymoss, James Douketis, Ajay Kakkar
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the second leading cause of death in patients with cancer. These patients are at an increased risk of developing VTE and are more likely to have a recurrence of VTE and bleeding while taking anticoagulants. Management of VTE in patients with cancer is a major therapeutic challenge and remains suboptimal worldwide. In 2013, the International Initiative on Thrombosis and Cancer (ITAC-CME), established to reduce the global burden of VTE in patients with cancer, published international guidelines for the treatment and prophylaxis of VTE and central venous catheter-associated thrombosis...
October 2016: Lancet Oncology
J Abram, J Klocker, N Innerhofer-Pompernigg, M Mittermayr, M C Freund, N Gravenstein, V Wenzel
Injuries to blood vessels near the heart can quickly become life-threatening and include arterial injuries during central venous puncture, which can lead to hemorrhagic shock. We report 6 patients in whom injury to the subclavian artery and vein led to life-threatening complications. Central venous catheters are associated with a multitude of risks, such as venous thrombosis, air embolism, systemic or local infections, paresthesia, hemothorax, pneumothorax, and cervical hematoma, which are not always immediately discernible...
October 5, 2016: Der Anaesthesist
Chung-Sik Oh, Ka Young Rhee, Tae-Gyoon Yoon, Seong-Hyop Kim
OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the incidence of percutaneous superior vena cava catheter-related thrombosis and identified risk factors for developing the condition in patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: A total of 121 patients were evaluated. A percutaneous superior vena cava catheter was inserted into the right internal jugular vein during cardiovascular surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. The right internal jugular vein was evaluated using ultrasonography, including cross-sectional area and velocity just before insertion of the percutaneous superior vena cava catheter (preoperative) and 24 hours and 48 hours after its insertion...
August 28, 2016: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Aurelia B Fu, Erica I Hodgman, Lorraine S Burkhalter, Rachel Renkes, Tamra Slone, Adam C Alder
BACKGROUND: Central venous access devices (CVADs) play an important role in the management of pediatric oncology patients; unfortunately, they are also associated with potentially serious complication rates. We hypothesized that, despite the significantly different disease courses typical of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myelogenous leukemia, there would be identifiable risk factors for premature CVAD removal. METHODS: We retrospectively studied clinical characteristics and procedure records for all patients admitted with a leukemia diagnosis at our institution from May 2009 to July 2014...
October 2016: Journal of Surgical Research
Alexandra Marquez, Veronika Shabanova, Edward Vincent S Faustino
OBJECTIVE: We determined whether in critically ill children with an untunneled central venous catheter, the risk of catheter-associated deep venous thrombosis can be predicted within 24 hours after insertion of the catheter. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of two multicenter prospective cohort studies. SETTING: PICUs in Northeastern United States. PATIENTS: A total of 175 children admitted to the PICU within 24 hours after insertion of an untunneled central venous catheter who did not receive anticoagulation were included...
September 22, 2016: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Gauri Bhutani, Mireille El Ters, Walter K Kremers, Joe L Klunder, Sandra J Taler, Amy W Williams, Andrew H Stockland, Marie C Hogan
Introduction Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) may adversely impact future successful arteriovenous fistulae (AVF). As part of a quality improvement project, the performance of tunneled small bore tunneled central venous catheters (TSB-CVCs), as alternatives to PICCs, was evaluated. Methods A retrospective observational study, involving individuals ≥18 years of age who underwent TSB-CVC placement by Interventional Radiology at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN between 1/1/2010 and 8/30/2013...
September 20, 2016: Hemodialysis International
C Heleen van Ommen, Jeanine J Sol
Neonatal hemostasis differs qualitatively, but in particular quantitatively, from hemostasis in older children and adults. Nevertheless, hemostasis in healthy neonates is functionally stable with no tendency to bleeding or thrombotic complications. In sick neonates, however, risk factors may disrupt this equilibrium and lead to thrombosis. The most important risk factor is the central venous catheter. Management of neonatal central venous catheter thrombosis is challenging, as no controlled trials have been performed...
September 16, 2016: Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
Ketan Kulkarni
As a pediatric hematologist oncologist with clinical and research interests in thrombosis in high-risk pediatric populations, and also as a member of International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Early Career Task Force (ISTH ECTF), I had the opportunity to develop a guidance document on "Thromboprophylaxis for central venous catheters in the pediatric population" to the "Guidelines and Guidance Documents" committee. In this communication, I share my experiences to date, I discuss my excitement and initial success, the steep learning curve required to build research acumen, the lessons learnt, and the opportunities and challenges faced...
September 14, 2016: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis: JTH
Bekir Şanal, Ömer Fatih Nas, Nurullah Doğan, Mehmet Korkmaz, Kadir Hacıkurt, Abdulmecid Yıldız, İrem İris Kan Aytaç, Bahattin Hakyemez, Cüneyt Erdoğan
PURPOSE: We aimed to investigate the safety and functionality of tunneled transhepatic hemodialysis catheters in chronic hemodialysis patients. METHODS: Thirty-eight patients (20 women aged 56±10 years and 18 men aged 61±11 years) with transhepatic tunneled hemodialysis catheters were evaluated. The date of the first transhepatic catheterization, indications, procedure details, functional time periods of catheters, reasons for the removal or revision of catheters, catheter-related complications, and current conditions of patients were retrospectively analyzed...
September 6, 2016: Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology: Official Journal of the Turkish Society of Radiology
Paula Parás-Bravo, María Paz-Zulueta, Raquel Sarabia-Lavin, Francisco Jose Amo-Setién, Manuel Herrero-Montes, Encarnación Olavarría-Beivíde, Mercedes Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Blanca Torres-Manrique, Carlos Rodríguez-de la Vega, Vanesa Caso-Álvarez, Laura González-Parralo, Francisco Manuel Antolín-Juárez
BACKGROUND AND AIM: The use of venous catheters is a widespread practice, especially in oncological and oncohematological units. The objective of this study was to evaluate the complications associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in a cohort of patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, we included all patient carrying PICCs (n = 603) inserted at our institute between October 2010 and December 2013. The main variables collected were medical diagnosis, catheter care, location, duration of catheterization, reasons for catheter removal, complications, and nursing care...
2016: PloS One
Takehiro Kubota, Kunishige Okamura, Yoshiro Matsui
Thrombosis around intravenous catheters are often found in daily practice, and their treatment must be considered if they are mobile or large. However, in such giant thrombosis cases as this one, it is considered that thrombolytic therapy is ineffective and that immediate surgical resection is the best choice of treatment. The patient had a very uniquely-shaped right atrial thrombus.
September 2016: Kyobu Geka. the Japanese Journal of Thoracic Surgery
Franklin Correa Barcellos, Bruno Pereira Nunes, Luciana Jorge Valle, Thiago Lopes, Bianca Orlando, Cintia Scherer, Marcia Nunes, Gabriela Araújo Duarte, Maristela Böhlke
BACKGROUND: Central venous catheters (CVC) are the only option when hemodialysis is needed for patients without definitive vascular access. However, CVC is associated with complications, such as infection, thrombosis, and dysfunction, leading to higher mortality and expenditures. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 30 % trisodium citrate (TSC30 %) with heparin as CVC lock solutions in preventing catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) and dysfunction in hemodialysis patients...
August 29, 2016: Infection
J J Menéndez, C Verdú, B Calderón, A Gómez-Zamora, C Schüffelmann, J J de la Cruz, P de la Oliva
: Essentials Pediatric studies on peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related thrombosis are scarce. This study analyzes incidence and risk factors for PICC-related venous thrombosis in children. PICC-related thrombosis is a common, and nearly always, asymptomatic complication. Echo-guided insertion and a catheter to vein ratio < 0.33 may notably decrease this complication. SUMMARY: Background Upper-extremity venous thrombosis is associated with the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs)...
August 25, 2016: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis: JTH
Mohammad Refaei, Bruna Fernandes, Joseph Brandwein, Marilyn Dawn Goodyear, Arun Pokhrel, Cynthia Wu
Central venous catheters are a leading cause of upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis. Concomitant severe thrombocytopenia makes anticoagulation for catheter-related thrombosis (CRT) in patients with acute leukemia (AL) a challenge. Incidence of CRT has been reported to be increased in those with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) vs. those with centrally inserted ones (CICC). Our objective is to compare the incidence rate of CRT in leukemia inpatients who received either a PICC vs. CICC. We retrospectively reviewed adult inpatients admitted to hematology wards with a new diagnosis of AL and who received either a PICC or a CICC...
August 20, 2016: Annals of Hematology
Elizabeth J Brisbois, Terry C Major, Marcus J Goudie, Mark E Meyerhoff, Robert H Bartlett, Hitesh Handa
UNLABELLED: Two major problems with implanted catheters are clotting and infection. Nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous vasodilator as well as natural inhibitor of platelet adhesion/activation and an antimicrobial agent, and NO-releasing polymers are expected to have similar properties. Here, NO-releasing central venous catheters (CVCs) are fabricated using Elast-eon™ E2As polymer with both diazeniumdiolated dibutylhexanediamine (DBHD/NONO) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) additives, where the NO release can be modulated and optimized via the hydrolysis rate of the PLGA...
October 15, 2016: Acta Biomaterialia
James Yip, David A Bruno, Charlotte Burmeister, Marwan Kazimi, Atsushi Yoshida, Marwan S Abouljoud, Gabriel T Schnickel
UNLABELLED: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are surgical complications estimated to occur in 5% to 10% of patients. There are limited data regarding DVT/PE in the early postoperative period in liver transplant patients. The aim of this study is to determine risk factors that influence the incidence of DVT/PE and the effectiveness of prophylaxis. METHODS: We reviewed the records of 999 patients who underwent initial liver transplant between January 2000 and June 2012 at Henry Ford Hospital...
April 2016: Transplantation Direct
Vinay Narasimha Krishna, Joseph B Eason, Michael Allon
Central venous stenosis (CVS) is encountered frequently among hemodialysis patients. Prior ipsilateral central venous catheterization and cardiac rhythm device insertions are common risk factors, but CVS can also occur in the absence of this history. Chronic CVS can cause thrombosis with partial or complete occlusion of the central vein at the site of stenosis. CVS is frequently asymptomatic and identified as an incidental finding during imaging studies. Symptomatic CVS presents most commonly as an upper- or lower-extremity edema ipsilateral to the CVS...
August 1, 2016: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
Christina K Park, Bosco A Paes, Kim Nagel, Anthony K Chan, Prashanth Murthy
Thrombotic occlusion of central venous catheters (CVCs) is a common problem in newborns. No guideline systematically addresses the diagnosis, management, and prevention of this complication. The objective of this review is to establish evidence-based guidance for the management of CVC thrombosis. A comprehensive literature search was conducted from 1948 to 2012. Twenty-six articles fulfilling four criteria - humans, neonates aged less than 28 days, CVC insertion, and English language - were included for analysis...
July 29, 2016: Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis: An International Journal in Haemostasis and Thrombosis
Madhur Kumar, Amarjit Singh, Kuldeep Singh Sidhu, Avleen Kaur
Although Central Venous Catheter (CVC) placement is a relatively simple procedure but its insertion and maintenance are associated with significant risks. Malposition (defined as any CVC tip position outside the superior vena cava) may be associated with catheter insertion and may require immediate intervention. It may result in complications like haemothorax, pleural effusions, pneumothorax, sepsis, thrombosis and cardiac tamponade. This case report presents timely detection of the complication after placement of CVC...
May 2016: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research: JCDR
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