keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

dinoflagellate

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28342593/taxocoenosis-of-epibenthic-dinoflagellates-in-the-coastal-waters-of-the-northern-yucatan-peninsula-before-and-after-the-harmful-algal-bloom-event-in-2011-2012
#1
Ana C Aguilar-Trujillo, Yuri B Okolodkov, Jorge A Herrera-Silveira, Fany Del C Merino-Virgilio, Citlalli Galicia-García
Eutrophication causes the major impact in the coastal waters of the state of Yucatan. In general, loss of water quality and biological communities and massive development of toxic microorganisms are some of the consequences of this phenomenon. To reveal changes in species composition and cell abundance of the taxocoenosis of epibenthic dinoflagellates before and after a harmful algal bloom event in the water column that lasted about 150days (August-December 2011) in the Dzilam - San Crisanto area (northern Yucatan Peninsula, southeastern Gulf of Mexico) were the main objectives of the present study...
March 22, 2017: Marine Pollution Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333196/identification-of-highly-divergent-diatom-derived-chloroplasts-in-dinoflagellates-including-a-description-of-durinskia-kwazulunatalensis-sp-nov-peridiniales-dinophyceae
#2
Norico Yamada, Stuart D Sym, Takeo Horiguchi
Dinoflagellates are known to possess chloroplasts of multiple origins derived from a red alga, a green alga, haptophytes, or diatoms. The monophyletic "dinotoms" harbor a chloroplast of diatom origin, but their chloroplasts are polyphyletic belonging to one of four genera: Chaetoceros, Cyclotella, Discostella, or Nitzschia. It has been speculated that serial replacement of diatom-derived chloroplasts by other diatoms has caused this diversity of chloroplasts. Although previous work suggested that the endosymbionts of Nitzschia origin might not be monophyletic, this has not been seriously investigated...
February 21, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332589/cell-cycle-arrest-and-biochemical-changes-accompanying-cell-death-in-harmful-dinoflagellates-following-exposure-to-bacterial-algicide-iri-160aa
#3
Kaytee L Pokrzywinski, Charles L Tilney, Mark E Warner, Kathryn J Coyne
Bacteria may play a role in regulating harmful algal blooms, but little is known about the biochemical and physiological changes associated with cell death induced by algicidal bacteria. Previous work characterized an algicidal exudate (IRI-160AA) produced by Shewanella sp. IRI-160 that is effective against dinoflagellates, while having little to no effect on other phytoplankton species in laboratory culture experiments. The objective of this study was to evaluate biochemical changes associated with cell death and impacts on the cell cycle in three dinoflagellate species (Prorocentrum minimum, Karlodinium veneficum and Gyrodinium instriatum) after exposure to IRI-160AA...
March 23, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326551/cyclic-imine-toxins-from-dinoflagellates-a-growing-family-of-potent-antagonists-of-the-nicotinic-acetylcholine-receptors
#4
REVIEW
Jordi Molgó, Pascale Marchot, Rómulo Aráoz, Evelyne Benoit, Bogdan I Iorga, Armen Zakarian, Palmer Taylor, Yves Bourne, Denis Servent
We present an overview of the toxicological profile of the fast-acting, lipophilic macrocyclic imine toxins, an emerging family of organic compounds associated with algal blooms, shellfish contamination and neurotoxicity. Worldwide, shellfish contamination incidents are expanding; therefore, the significance of these toxins for the shellfish food industry deserves further study. Emphasis is directed to the dinoflagellate species involved in their production, their chemical structures, and their specific mode of interaction with their principal natural molecular targets, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, or with the soluble acetylcholine-binding protein, used as a surrogate receptor model...
March 21, 2017: Journal of Neurochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326066/beneficial-microorganisms-for-corals-bmc-proposed-mechanisms-for-coral-health-and-resilience
#5
REVIEW
Raquel S Peixoto, Phillipe M Rosado, Deborah Catharine de Assis Leite, Alexandre S Rosado, David G Bourne
The symbiotic association between the coral animal and its endosymbiotic dinoflagellate partner Symbiodinium is central to the success of corals. However, an array of other microorganisms associated with coral (i.e., Bacteria, Archaea, Fungi, and viruses) have a complex and intricate role in maintaining homeostasis between corals and Symbiodinium. Corals are sensitive to shifts in the surrounding environmental conditions. One of the most widely reported responses of coral to stressful environmental conditions is bleaching...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323278/acceptable-symbiont-cell-size-differs-among-cnidarian-species-and-may-limit-symbiont-diversity
#6
Elise Biquand, Nami Okubo, Yusuke Aihara, Vivien Rolland, David C Hayward, Masayuki Hatta, Jun Minagawa, Tadashi Maruyama, Shunichi Takahashi
Reef-building corals form symbiotic relationships with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. Symbiodinium are genetically and physiologically diverse, and corals may be able to adapt to different environments by altering their dominant Symbiodinium phylotype. Notably, each coral species associates only with specific Symbiodinium phylotypes, and consequently the diversity of symbionts available to the host is limited by the species specificity. Currently, it is widely presumed that species specificity is determined by the combination of cell-surface molecules on the host and symbiont...
March 21, 2017: ISME Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323217/effects-of-algal-toxin-okadaic-acid-on-the-non-specific-immune-and-antioxidant-response-of-bay-scallop-argopecten-irradians
#7
Cheng Chi, Sib Sankar Giri, Jin Woo Jun, Hyoun Joong Kim, Sang Wha Kim, Saekil Yun, Se Chang Park
Okadaic acid (OA) is produced by dinoflagellates during harmful algal blooms and is a diarrhetic shellfish-poisoning (DSP) toxin. This toxin is particularly problematic for bivalves that are cultured for human consumption. This study aimed to reveal the effects of exposure to OA on the non-specific immune responses of bay scallop, Argopecten irradians. Various immunological parameters (superoxide dismutase (SOD), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lysozyme activities, and total protein level) were assessed in the hemolymph of bay scallops at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h post-exposure (hpe) to different concentrations (50, 100, and 500 nM) of OA...
March 17, 2017: Fish & Shellfish Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28315825/effects-of-florida-red-tides-on-histone-variant-expression-and-dna-methylation-in-the-eastern-oyster-crassostrea-virginica
#8
Rodrigo Gonzalez-Romero, Victoria Suarez-Ulloa, Javier Rodriguez-Casariego, Daniel Garcia-Souto, Gabriel Diaz, Abraham Smith, Juan Jose Pasantes, Gary Rand, Jose M Eirin-Lopez
Massive algal proliferations known as Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) represent one of the most important threats to coastal areas. Among them, the so-called Florida Red Tides (FRTs, caused by blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis and associated brevetoxins) are particularly detrimental in the southeastern U.S., causing high mortality rates and annual losses in excess of $40 million. The ability of marine organisms to cope with environmental stressors (including those produced during HABs) is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter resulting in phenotypic changes caused by heritable modifications in gene expression, without involving changes in the genetic (DNA) sequence...
March 7, 2017: Aquatic Toxicology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28304358/a-pelagic-microbiome-viruses-to-protists-from-a-small-cup-of-seawater
#9
Flavia Flaviani, Declan C Schroeder, Cecilia Balestreri, Joanna L Schroeder, Karen Moore, Konrad Paszkiewicz, Maya C Pfaff, Edward P Rybicki
The aquatic microbiome is composed of a multi-phylotype community of microbes, ranging from the numerically dominant viruses to the phylogenetically diverse unicellular phytoplankton. They influence key biogeochemical processes and form the base of marine food webs, becoming food for secondary consumers. Due to recent advances in next-generation sequencing, this previously overlooked component of our hydrosphere is starting to reveal its true diversity and biological complexity. We report here that 250 mL of seawater is sufficient to provide a comprehensive description of the microbial diversity in an oceanic environment...
March 17, 2017: Viruses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303313/significant-change-in-marine-plankton-structure-and-carbon-production-after-the-addition-of-river-water-in-a-mesocosm-experiment
#10
E Fouilland, A Trottet, C Alves-de-Souza, D Bonnet, T Bouvier, M Bouvy, S Boyer, L Guillou, E Hatey, H Jing, C Leboulanger, E Le Floc'h, H Liu, S Mas, B Mostajir, J Nouguier, D Pecqueur, E Rochelle-Newall, C Roques, C Salles, M-G Tournoud, C Vasseur, F Vidussi
Rivers are known to be major contributors to eutrophication in marine coastal waters, but little is known on the short-term impact of freshwater surges on the structure and functioning of the marine plankton community. The effect of adding river water, reducing the salinity by 15 and 30%, on an autumn plankton community in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (Thau Lagoon, France) was determined during a 6-day mesocosm experiment. Adding river water brought not only nutrients but also chlorophyceans that did not survive in the brackish mesocosm waters...
March 16, 2017: Microbial Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28297706/phytoplankton-can-actively-diversify-their-migration-strategy-in-response-to-turbulent-cues
#11
Anupam Sengupta, Francesco Carrara, Roman Stocker
Marine phytoplankton inhabit a dynamic environment where turbulence, together with nutrient and light availability, shapes species fitness, succession and selection. Many species of phytoplankton are motile and undertake diel vertical migrations to gain access to nutrient-rich deeper layers at night and well-lit surface waters during the day. Disruption of this migratory strategy by turbulence is considered to be an important cause of the succession between motile and non-motile species when conditions turn turbulent...
March 15, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28293249/transcriptomic-analysis-of-thermally-stressed-symbiodinium-reveals-differential-expression-of-stress-and-metabolism-genes
#12
Sarah L Gierz, Sylvain Forêt, William Leggat
Endosymbioses between dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and scleractinian coral species form the foundation of coral reef ecosystems. The coral symbiosis is highly susceptible to elevated temperatures, resulting in coral bleaching, where the algal symbiont is released from host cells. This experiment aimed to determine the transcriptional changes in cultured Symbiodinium, to better understand the response of cellular mechanisms under future temperature conditions. Cultures were exposed to elevated temperatures (average 31°C) or control conditions (24...
2017: Frontiers in Plant Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28286360/biogeography-and-molecular-diversity-of-coral-symbionts-in-the-genus-symbiodinium-around-the-arabian-peninsula
#13
Maren Ziegler, Chatchanit Arif, John A Burt, Sergey Dobretsov, Cornelia Roder, Todd C LaJeunesse, Christian R Voolstra
AIM: Coral reefs rely on the symbiosis between scleractinian corals and intracellular, photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium making the assessment of symbiont diversity critical to our understanding of ecological resilience of these ecosystems. This study characterizes Symbiodinium diversity around the Arabian Peninsula, which contains some of the most thermally diverse and understudied reefs on Earth. LOCATION: Shallow water coral reefs throughout the Red Sea (RS), Sea of Oman (SO), and Persian/Arabian Gulf (PAG)...
March 2017: Journal of Biogeography
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28283297/a-new-approach-for-the-estimation-of-phytoplankton-cell-counts-associated-with-algal-blooms
#14
Majid Nazeer, Man Sing Wong, Janet Elizabeth Nichol
This study proposes a method for estimating phytoplankton cell counts associated with an algal bloom, using satellite images coincident with in situ and meteorological parameters. Satellite images from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM), Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), Operational Land Imager (OLI) and HJ-1 A/B Charge Couple Device (CCD) sensors were integrated with the meteorological observations to provide an estimate of phytoplankton cell counts. All images were atmospherically corrected using the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) atmospheric correction method with a possible error of 1...
March 7, 2017: Science of the Total Environment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28282404/characterization-of-bacterial-community-associated-with-phytoplankton-bloom-in-a-eutrophic-lake-in-south-norway-using-16s-rrna-gene-amplicon-sequence-analysis
#15
Niranjan Nitin Parulekar, Pandurang Kolekar, Andrew Jenkins, Synne Kleiven, Hans Utkilen, Anette Johansen, Sangeeta Sawant, Urmila Kulkarni-Kale, Mohan Kale, Mona Sæbø
Interactions between different phytoplankton taxa and heterotrophic bacterial communities within aquatic environments can differentially support growth of various heterotrophic bacterial species. In this study, phytoplankton diversity was studied using traditional microscopic techniques and the bacterial communities associated with phytoplankton bloom were studied using High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from the V1-V3 and V3-V4 hypervariable regions. Samples were collected from Lake Akersvannet, a eutrophic lake in South Norway, during the growth season from June to August 2013...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28275727/extreme-warmth-and-heat-stressed-plankton-in-the-tropics-during-the-paleocene-eocene-thermal-maximum
#16
Joost Frieling, Holger Gebhardt, Matthew Huber, Olabisi A Adekeye, Samuel O Akande, Gert-Jan Reichart, Jack J Middelburg, Stefan Schouten, Appy Sluijs
Global ocean temperatures rapidly warmed by ~5°C during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~56 million years ago). Extratropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs) met or exceeded modern subtropical values. With these warm extratropical temperatures, climate models predict tropical SSTs >35°C-near upper physiological temperature limits for many organisms. However, few data are available to test these projected extreme tropical temperatures or their potential lethality. We identify the PETM in a shallow marine sedimentary section deposited in Nigeria...
March 2017: Science Advances
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28273342/robust-dinoflagellata-phylogeny-inferred-from-public-transcriptome-databases
#17
Dana C Price, Debashish Bhattacharya
Dinoflagellates are dominant members of the plankton and play key roles in ocean ecosystems as primary producers, predators, parasites, coral photobionts, and causative agents of algal blooms that produce toxins harmful to humans and commercial fisheries. These unicellular protists exhibit remarkable trophic and morphological diversity and include species with some of the largest reported nuclear genomes. Despite their high ecological and economic importance, comprehensive genome (or transcriptome) based dinoflagellate trees of life are few in number...
March 8, 2017: Journal of Phycology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28272836/mapping-carbon-fate-during-bleaching-in-a-model-cnidarian-symbiosis-the-application-of-13-c-metabolomics
#18
Katie E Hillyer, Daniel A Dias, Adrian Lutz, Ute Roessner, Simon K Davy
Coral bleaching is a major threat to the persistence of coral reefs. Yet we lack detailed knowledge of the metabolic interactions that determine symbiosis function and bleaching-induced change. We mapped autotrophic carbon fate within the free metabolite pools of both partners of a model cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis (Aiptasia-Symbiodinium) during exposure to thermal stress via the stable isotope tracer ((13) C bicarbonate), coupled to GC-MS. Symbiont photodamage and pronounced bleaching coincided with substantial increases in the turnover of non(13) C-labelled pools in the dinoflagellate (lipid and starch store catabolism)...
March 8, 2017: New Phytologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28265497/indomethacin-reproducibly-induces-metamorphosis-in-cassiopea-xamachana-scyphistomae
#19
Patricia Cabrales-Arellano, Tania Islas-Flores, Patricia E Thomé, Marco A Villanueva
Cassiopea xamachana jellyfish are an attractive model system to study metamorphosis and/or cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis due to the ease of cultivation of their planula larvae and scyphistomae through their asexual cycle, in which the latter can bud new larvae and continue the cycle without differentiation into ephyrae. Then, a subsequent induction of metamorphosis and full differentiation into ephyrae is believed to occur when the symbionts are acquired by the scyphistomae. Although strobilation induction and differentiation into ephyrae can be accomplished in various ways, a controlled, reproducible metamorphosis induction has not been reported...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28264430/characterization-of-a-new-trioxilin-and-a-sulfoquinovosyl-diacylglycerol-with-anti-inflammatory-properties-from-the-dinoflagellate-oxyrrhis-marina
#20
Eun Young Yoon, A Reum Yang, Jaeyeon Park, Seung Joo Moon, Eun Ju Jeong, Jung-Rae Rho
Two new compounds-a trioxilin and a sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol (SQDG)-were isolated from the methanolic extract of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina cultivated by feeding on dried yeasts. The trioxilin was identified as (4Z,8E,13Z,16Z,19Z) -7(S),10(S),11(S)-trihydroxydocosapentaenoic acid (1), and the SQDG was identified as (2S)-1-O-hexadecanosy-2-O-docosahexaenoyl-3-O-(6-sulfo-α-d-quinovopyranosyl)-glycerol (2) by a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra, mass analyses, and chemical reactions...
February 27, 2017: Marine Drugs
keyword
keyword
46253
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"