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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29338021/coral-physiology-and-microbiome-dynamics-under-combined-warming-and-ocean-acidification
#1
Andréa G Grottoli, Paula Dalcin Martins, Michael J Wilkins, Michael D Johnston, Mark E Warner, Wei-Jun Cai, Todd F Melman, Kenneth D Hoadley, D Tye Pettay, Stephen Levas, Verena Schoepf
Rising seawater temperature and ocean acidification threaten the survival of coral reefs. The relationship between coral physiology and its microbiome may reveal why some corals are more resilient to these global change conditions. Here, we conducted the first experiment to simultaneously investigate changes in the coral microbiome and coral physiology in response to the dual stress of elevated seawater temperature and ocean acidification expected by the end of this century. Two species of corals, Acropora millepora containing the thermally sensitive endosymbiont C21a and Turbinaria reniformis containing the thermally tolerant endosymbiont Symbiodinium trenchi, were exposed to control (26...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29334418/antimicrobial-and-stress-responses-to-increased-temperature-and-bacterial-pathogen-challenge-in-the-holobiont-of-a-reef-building-coral
#2
Jeroen A J M van de Water, Maryam Chaib De Mares, Groves B Dixon, Jean-Baptiste Raina, Bette L Willis, David G Bourne, Madeleine J H van Oppen
Global increases in coral disease prevalence have been linked to ocean warming through changes in coral-associated bacterial communities, pathogen virulence and immune system function. However, the interactive effects of temperature and pathogens on the coral holobiont are poorly understood. Here, we assessed three compartments of the holobiont (host, Symbiodinium, bacterial community) of the coral Montipora aequituberculata challenged with the pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus and the commensal bacterium Oceanospirillales sp...
January 15, 2018: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29321691/deciphering-the-nature-of-the-coral-chromera-association
#3
Amin R Mohamed, Vivian R Cumbo, Saki Harii, Chuya Shinzato, Cheong Xin Chan, Mark A Ragan, Nori Satoh, Eldon E Ball, David J Miller
Since the discovery of Chromera velia as a novel coral-associated microalga, this organism has attracted interest because of its unique evolutionary position between the photosynthetic dinoflagellates and the parasitic apicomplexans. The nature of the relationship between Chromera and its coral host is controversial. Is it a mutualism, from which both participants benefit, a parasitic relationship, or a chance association? To better understand the interaction, larvae of the common Indo-Pacific reef-building coral Acropora digitifera were experimentally infected with Chromera, and the impact on the host transcriptome was assessed at 4, 12, and 48 h post-infection using Illumina RNA-Seq technology...
January 10, 2018: ISME Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29316019/cell-cycle-dynamics-of-cultured-coral-endosymbiotic-microalgae-symbiodinium-across-different-types-species-under-alternate-light-and-temperature-conditions
#4
Lisa Fujise, Matthew R Nitschke, Jörg C Frommlet, João Serôdio, Stephen Woodcock, Peter J Ralph, David J Suggett
Dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium live in symbiosis with many invertebrates, including reef-building corals. Hosts maintain this symbiosis through continuous regulation of Symbiodinium cell density via expulsion and degradation (post-mitotic) and/or constraining cell growth and division through manipulation of the symbiont cell cycle (pre-mitotic). Importance of pre-mitotic regulation is unknown since little data exists on cell cycles for the immense genetic diversity of Symbiodinium. We therefore examined cell cycle progression for several distinct Symbiodinium ITS2-types (B1, C1, D1a)...
January 8, 2018: Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29233707/phylogenetic-characterization-of-transporter-proteins-in-the-cnidarian-dinoflagellate-symbiosis
#5
Ashley E Sproles, Nathan L Kirk, Sheila A Kitchen, Clinton A Oakley, Arthur R Grossman, Virginia M Weis, Simon K Davy
Metabolic exchange between cnidarians and their symbiotic dinoflagellates is central to maintaining their mutualistic relationship. Sugars are translocated to the host, while ammonium and nitrate are utilized by the dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp.). We investigated membrane protein sequences of each partner to identify potential transporter proteins that move sugars into cnidarian cells and nitrogen products into Symbiodinium cells. We examined the facilitated glucose transporters (GLUT), sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLT), and aquaporin (AQP) channels in the cnidarian host as mechanisms for sugar uptake, and the ammonium and high-affinity nitrate transporters (AMT and NRT2, respectively) in the algal symbiont as mechanisms for nitrogen uptake...
December 9, 2017: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29222444/diazotroph-diversity-and-nitrogen-fixation-in-the-coral-stylophora-pistillata-from-the-great-barrier-reef
#6
Michael P Lesser, Kathleen M Morrow, Sabrina M Pankey, Sam H C Noonan
Diazotrophs, both Bacteria and Archaea, capable of fixing nitrogen (N2), are present in the tissues and mucous, of corals and can supplement the coral holobiont nitrogen budget with fixed nitrogen (N) in the form of ammonia (NH3). Stylophora pistillata from Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef collected at 5 and 15 m, and experimentally manipulated in the laboratory, showed that the rates of net photosynthesis, steady state quantum yields of photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence (∆F v/F m') and calcification varied based on irradiance as expected...
December 8, 2017: ISME Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29218749/evidence-for-mirna-mediated-modulation-of-the-host-transcriptome-in-cnidarian-dinoflagellate-symbiosis
#7
Sebastian Baumgarten, Maha J Cziesielski, Ludivine Thomas, Craig T Michell, Lisl Y Esherick, John R Pringle, Manuel Aranda, Christian R Voolstra
Reef-building corals and other cnidarians living in symbiotic relationships with intracellular, photosynthetic dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium undergo transcriptomic changes during infection with the algae and maintenance of the endosymbiont population. However, the precise regulatory mechanisms modulating the host transcriptome are unknown. Here we report apparent post-transcriptional gene regulation by miRNAs in the sea anemone Aiptasia, a model system for cnidarian-dinoflagellate endosymbiosis...
December 8, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29217594/glucose-induced-trophic-shift-in-an-endosymbiont-dinoflagellate-with-physiological-and-molecular-consequences
#8
Tingting Xiang, Robert E Jinkerson, Sophie Clowez, Cawa Tran, Cory J Krediet, Masayuki Onishi, Phillip A Cleves, John R Pringle, Arthur R Grossman
Interactions between the dinoflagellate endosymbiont Symbiodinium and its cnidarian hosts (e.g., corals, sea anemones) are the foundation of coral-reef ecosystems. Carbon flow between the partners is a hallmark of this mutualism, but the mechanisms governing this flow and its impact on symbiosis remain poorly understood. We showed previously that although Symbiodinium strain SSB01 can grow photoautotrophically, it can grow mixotrophically or heterotrophically when supplied with glucose, a metabolite normally transferred from the alga to its host...
December 7, 2017: Plant Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29216891/a-multi-trait-systems-approach-reveals-a-response-cascade-to-bleaching-in-corals
#9
Stephanie G Gardner, Jean-Baptiste Raina, Matthew R Nitschke, Daniel A Nielsen, Michael Stat, Cherie A Motti, Peter J Ralph, Katherina Petrou
BACKGROUND: Climate change causes the breakdown of the symbiotic relationships between reef-building corals and their photosynthetic symbionts (genus Symbiodinium), with thermal anomalies in 2015-2016 triggering the most widespread mass coral bleaching on record and unprecedented mortality on the Great Barrier Reef. Targeted studies using specific coral stress indicators have highlighted the complexity of the physiological processes occurring during thermal stress, but have been unable to provide a clear mechanistic understanding of coral bleaching...
December 7, 2017: BMC Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29212723/intraspecific-and-interspecific-variation-in-thermotolerance-and-photoacclimation-in-symbiodinium-dinoflagellates
#10
Erika M Díaz-Almeyda, C Prada, A H Ohdera, H Moran, D J Civitello, R Iglesias-Prieto, T A Carlo, T C LaJeunesse, M Medina
Light and temperature are major drivers in the ecology and biogeography of symbiotic dinoflagellates living in corals and other cnidarians. We examined variations in physiology among 11 strains comprising five species of clade A Symbiodinium We grew cultures at 26°C (control) and 32°C (high temperature) over a duration of 18 days while measuring growth and photochemical efficiency (Fv /Fm ). Responses to thermal stress ranged from susceptible to tolerant across species and strains. Most strains exhibited a decrease in cell densities and Fv /Fm when grown at 32°C...
December 6, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29192903/rare-symbionts-may-contribute-to-the-resilience-of-coral-algal-assemblages
#11
Maren Ziegler, Víctor M Eguíluz, Carlos M Duarte, Christian R Voolstra
The association between corals and photosynthetic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp.) is the key to the success of reef ecosystems in highly oligotrophic environments, but it is also their Achilles' heel due to its vulnerability to local stressors and the effects of climate change. Research during the last two decades has shaped a view that coral host-Symbiodinium pairings are diverse, but largely exclusive. Deep sequencing has now revealed the existence of a rare diversity of cryptic Symbiodinium assemblages within the coral holobiont, in addition to one or a few abundant algal members...
December 1, 2017: ISME Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29190820/interactive-effects-of-spectral-quality-and-trace-metal-availability-on-the-growth-of-trichodesmium-and-symbiodinium
#12
Irene B Rodriguez, Tung-Yuan Ho
Light and trace metals are critical growth factors for algae but how the interdependence of light quality and metal availability affects algal growth remains largely unknown. Our previous studies have demonstrated the importance of Ni and Fe on the growth of Trichodesmium and Symbiodinium, respectively, two important marine primary producers inhabiting environments with high light intensities. Here, we investigated the effects of light quality and intensity with availability of either Ni or Fe on their growth...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29186143/comparative-growth-rates-of-cultured-marine-dinoflagellates-in-the-genus-symbiodinium-and-the-effects-of-temperature-and-light
#13
Anke Klueter, Jennifer Trapani, Frederick I Archer, Shelby E McIlroy, Mary Alice Coffroth
Many dinoflagellate microalgae of the genus Symbiodinium form successful symbioses with a large group of metazoans and selected protists. Yet knowledge of growth kinetics of these endosymbionts and their ecological and evolutionary implications is limited. We used a Bayesian biphasic generalized logistic model to estimate key parameters of the growth of five strains of cultured Symbiodinium, S. microadriaticum (cp-type A194; strain 04-503), S. microadriaticum (cp-type A194; strain CassKB8), S. minutum (cp-type B184; strain Mf 1...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29175860/high-salinity-conveys-thermotolerance-in-the-coral-model-aiptasia
#14
Hagen M Gegner, Maren Ziegler, Nils Rädecker, Carol Buitrago-López, Manuel Aranda, Christian R Voolstra
The endosymbiosis between dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium and stony corals provides the foundation of coral reef ecosystems. Coral bleaching, the expulsion of endosymbionts from the coral host tissue as a consequence of heat or light stress, poses a threat to reef ecosystem functioning on a global scale. Hence, a better understanding of the factors contributing to heat stress susceptibility and tolerance is needed. In this regard, some of the most thermotolerant corals also live in particularly saline habitats, but possible effects of high salinity on thermotolerance in corals are anecdotal...
November 24, 2017: Biology Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29167578/comparative-genomics-of-color-morphs-in-the-coral-montastraea-cavernosa
#15
Jessica K Jarett, Matthew D MacManes, Kathleen M Morrow, M Sabrina Pankey, Michael P Lesser
Montastraea cavernosa is a common coral in the Caribbean basin found in several color morphs. To investigate the causes for brown and orange morphs we undertook a genomics approach on corals collected at the same time and depth in the Bahamas. The coral holobiont includes the host, symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp.), and a diverse microbiome. While the coral host showed significant genetic differentiation between color morphs both the composition of the Symbiodinium spp. communities and the prokaryotic communities did not...
November 22, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29167511/transcription-factor-nf-%C3%AE%C2%BAb-is-modulated-by-symbiotic-status-in-a-sea-anemone-model-of-cnidarian-bleaching
#16
Katelyn M Mansfield, Nicole M Carter, Linda Nguyen, Phillip A Cleves, Anar Alshanbayeva, Leah M Williams, Camerron Crowder, Ashley R Penvose, John R Finnerty, Virginia M Weis, Trevor W Siggers, Thomas D Gilmore
Transcription factor NF-κB plays a central role in immunity from fruit flies to humans, and NF-κB activity is altered in many human diseases. To investigate a role for NF-κB in immunity and disease on a broader evolutionary scale we have characterized NF-κB in a sea anemone (Exaiptasia pallida; called Aiptasia herein) model for cnidarian symbiosis and dysbiosis (i.e., "bleaching"). We show that the DNA-binding site specificity of Aiptasia NF-κB is similar to NF-κB proteins from a broad expanse of organisms...
November 22, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29158383/optimal-nutrient-exchange-and-immune-responses-operate-in-partner-specificity-in-the-cnidarian-dinoflagellate-symbiosis
#17
Jennifer L Matthews, Camerron M Crowder, Clinton A Oakley, Adrian Lutz, Ute Roessner, Eli Meyer, Arthur R Grossman, Virginia M Weis, Simon K Davy
The relationship between reef-building corals and phototrophic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium is fundamental to the functioning of coral reef ecosystems. It has been suggested that reef corals may adapt to climate change by changing their dominant symbiont type to a more thermally tolerant one, although the capacity for such a community shift is potentially hindered by the compatibility of different host-symbiont pairings. Here we combined transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to characterize the molecular, cellular, and physiological processes that underlie this compatibility, with a particular focus on Symbiodinium trenchii, an opportunistic, thermally tolerant symbiont that flourishes in coral tissues after bleaching events...
November 20, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29150733/correction-to-coral-symbiodinium-community-composition-across-the-belize-mesoamerican-barrier-reef-system-is-influenced-by-host-species-and-thermal-variability
#18
J H Baumann, S W Davies, H E Aichelman, K D Castillo
The authors regret that acknowledgment for Dr. Adrian Marchetti was omitted from the manuscript. The correct acknowledgment is written below.
November 17, 2017: Microbial Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29124895/defining-the-core-microbiome-of-the-symbiotic-dinoflagellate-symbiodinium
#19
Caitlin A Lawson, Jean-Baptiste Raina, Tim Kahlke, Justin R Seymour, David J Suggett
Dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium underpin the survival and ecological success of corals. The use of cultured strains has been particularly important to disentangle the complex life history of Symbiodinium and their contribution to coral host physiology. However, these cultures typically harbour abundant bacterial communities which likely play important, but currently unknown, roles in Symbiodinium biology. We characterised the bacterial communities living in association with a wide phylogenetic diversity of Symbiodinium cultures (18 types spanning 5 clades) to define the core Symbiodinium microbiome...
November 10, 2017: Environmental Microbiology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29108677/salinity-stress-results-in-differential-hsp70-expression-in-the-exaiptasia-pallida-and-symbiodinium-symbiosis
#20
Mitchell A Ellison, M Drew Ferrier, Susan L Carney
Abiotic factors affect cnidarian-algal symbiosis and, if severe enough, can result in bleaching. Increased temperature and light are well characterized causes of bleaching, but other factors like salinity can also stress the holobiont. In cnidarian-dinoflagellate systems, the expression of host genes, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), changes due to thermal and light stress. In this experiment, we characterized to what extent salinity stress affects Hsp70 expression in the holobiont by simultaneously measuring host and symbiont Hsp70 expression in response to up to 8 h of hypo- and hypersaline conditions in the sea anemone Exaiptasia pallida and its intracellular symbiont Symbiodinium minutum...
October 23, 2017: Marine Environmental Research
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