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Blood flow restriction training

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29140137/v%C3%AC-o2-and-muscle-deoxygenation-kinetics-during-skating-comparison-between-slide-board-and-treadmill-skating
#1
Tatiane Piucco, Rogério Soares, Fernando Diefenthaeler, Guillaume Millet, Juan Murias
PURPOSE: this study aimed to compare the oxygen uptake (V̇O2) kinetics during skating on a treadmill and skating on a slide board and discuss potential mechanisms that might control the V̇O2 kinetics responses during skating. METHODS: breath-by-breath pulmonary V̇O2 and near-infrared spectroscopy-derived muscle deoxygenation ([HHbMb]) were monitored continuously in 12 well-trained young long track speed skaters. On-transient V̇O2 and [HHbMb] responses to skating on a treadmill and skating on a slide board at 80% of the estimated gas exchange threshold were fitted as mono-exponential function...
November 15, 2017: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29121681/concurrent-training-with-blood-flow-restriction-does-not-decrease-inflammatory-markers
#2
Thiago Mattos Frota de Souza, Cleiton Augusto Libardi, Cláudia Regina Cavaglieri, Arthur Fernandes Gáspari, Diego Trevisan Brunelli, Giovana Vergínia de Souza, Carlos Ugrinowitsch, Li Min Li, Mara Patricia Traina Chacon-Mikahil
The aging process is associated with several changes in the elderly such as the decrease in cardiorespiratory fitness, strength and muscle mass, in addition to chronic low-grade inflammation. Concurrent training with blood flow restriction can be an interesting alternative to improve functional capacity with low mechanical stress in the elderly. The purpose of this study was to compare the inflammatory effects in older individuals submitted to two different protocols of concurrent training. Twenty-two healthy older adults (63...
November 9, 2017: International Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29112627/impact-of-blood-flow-restriction-exercise-on-muscle-fatigue-development-and-recovery
#3
Florian Husmann, Thomas Mittlmeier, Sven Bruhn, Volker Zschorlich, Martin Behrens
PURPOSE: The present study was designed to provide mechanistic insight into the time-course and etiology of muscle fatigue development and recovery during and after low-intensity exercise when it is combined with blood flow restriction (BFR). METHODS: Seventeen resistance-trained males completed four sets of low-intensity isotonic resistance exercise under two experimental conditions: knee extension exercise combined with (i) BFR and (ii) without BFR (CON). Neuromuscular tests were performed before, during (immediately after each set of knee extension exercise) and 1, 2, 4, and 8 min after each experimental condition...
November 6, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29084094/the-effects-of-practical-blood-flow-restriction-training-on-adolescent-lower-body-strength
#4
Paul E Luebbers, Emily V Witte, Johnathan Q Oshel
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a practical blood flow restriction (BFR) training program on lower-body strength of high school weightlifters. Twenty-five students were divided into three groups. For six weeks, each group completed the same resistance training program with the exception of the parallel back squat exercise (2 days/week), which was different for each group. One group (HI) completed a traditional high load (≥65% 1RM) back squat protocol with three sets of low repetitions (≤10)...
October 27, 2017: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29084035/risks-of-exertional-rhabdomyolysis-with-blood-flow-restricted-training-beyond-the-case-report
#5
Kyle M A Thompson, Joshua T Slysz, Jamie F Burr
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 26, 2017: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29058111/the-effects-of-muscle-blood-flow-restriction-during-running-training-on-measures-of-aerobic-capacity-and-run-time-to-exhaustion
#6
Carl D Paton, Shalako M Addis, Lee-Anne Taylor
PURPOSE: Training with blood flow restriction (BFR) is known to enhance muscle mass and strength during resistance training activities. However, little is known about the BFR effects during aerobic training. This investigation examines the effects of running training performed with or without BFR on physiology and performance. METHOD: Sixteen subjects (age 24.9 ± 6.9 years, height 172.9 ± 7.8 cm, weight 75.1 ± 13.8 kg) were assigned to a BFR or control (CON) group for eight sessions of training...
October 20, 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29049889/early-metabolic-response-after-resistance-exercise-with-blood-flow-restriction-in-well-trained-men-a-metabolomics-approach
#7
Denis F Valério, Ricardo Berton, Miguel S Conceição, Rafael R Canevarolo, Mara Patrícia T Chacon-Mikahil, Cláudia R Cavaglieri, Gabriela V Meirelles, Ana C Zeri, Cleiton A Libardi
The present study aimed to compare the early metabolic response between high-load resistance exercise (HL-RE) and low-load resistance exercise with blood flow restriction (LL-BFR). Nine young well-trained men participated in a randomized crossover design in which each subject completed LL-BFR, HL-RE or condition control (no exercise) with a one-week interval between them. Blood samples were taken immediately before and five minutes after the exercise sessions. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy identified and quantified 48 metabolites, six of which presented significant changes among the exercise protocols...
October 19, 2017: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29043659/magnitude-of-muscle-strength-and-mass-adaptations-between-high-load-resistance-training-versus-low-load-resistance-training-associated-with-blood-flow-restriction-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#8
REVIEW
Manoel E Lixandrão, Carlos Ugrinowitsch, Ricardo Berton, Felipe C Vechin, Miguel S Conceição, Felipe Damas, Cleiton A Libardi, Hamilton Roschel
BACKGROUND: Low-load resistance training (< 50% of one-repetition maximum [1RM]) associated with blood-flow restriction (BFR-RT) has been thought to promote increases in muscle strength and mass. However, it remains unclear if the magnitude of these adaptations is similar to conventional high-load resistance training (> 65% 1RM; HL-RT). OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of HL- versus BFR-RT on muscle adaptations using a systematic review and meta-analysis procedure...
October 17, 2017: Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29023279/syncope-episodes-and-blood-flow-restriction-training
#9
Juan Martín-Hernández, Alejandro Santos-Lozano, Carl Foster, Alejandro Lucia
The combination of low-load resistance training [or more recently, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)] with a moderate local blood flow restriction (BFR) is becoming a widespread training and rehabilitation method. Scientific data indicate the overall safety of BFR, at least in healthy young people. However, it has been associated with side effects, usually minor, and further research is warranted regarding the safety and efficacy of this technique, especially in clinical populations. We found 3 syncope/presyncopal episodes among 21 healthy people (9 men), all occurring in men and during familiarization sessions (in which BFR was applied alone) but not thereafter (BFR sessions combined with NMES): 1 subject experienced a brief syncope and 2 other subjects exhibited presyncopal symptoms (sweating, lightheadedness, and pallor)...
October 6, 2017: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987643/blood-flow-restricted-resistance-training-in-older-adults-at-risk-of-mobility-limitations
#10
Summer B Cook, Dain P LaRoche, Michelle R Villa, Hannah Barile, Todd M Manini
High-load resistance training (HL) may be contraindicated in older adults due to pre-existing health conditions (e.g. osteoarthritis). Low-load blood flow restricted (BFR) resistance training offers an alternative to HL with potentially similar strength improvement. PURPOSE: To compare muscle strength, cross-sectional area (CSA), physical function, and quality of life (QOL) following 12-weeks of HL or BFR training in older adults at risk of mobility limitations. METHODS: Thirty-six males and females (mean: 75...
December 1, 2017: Experimental Gerontology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28986234/effects-of-blood-flow-restricted-exercise-training-on-muscular-strength-and-blood-flow-in-older-adults
#11
Jahyun Kim, James A Lang, Neha Pilania, Warren D Franke
BACKGROUND: In young adults, blood flow restricted exercise (BFRE) at relatively low intensities can increase muscle strength as effectively as conventional high intensity training. Ischemic exercise can also increase collateral blood flow in skeletal muscle. However, the effects of chronic BFRE on muscle strength and blood flow in older adults remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 4weeks of BFRE training on skeletal muscle strength and blood flow between young and older subjects and between older adults performing BFRE and conventional high intensity resistance exercise...
December 1, 2017: Experimental Gerontology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28966705/blood-flow-restriction-training-implementation-into-clinical-practice
#12
EDITORIAL
William R Vanwye, Alyssa M Weatherholt, Alan E Mikesky
To improve muscular strength and hypertrophy the American College of Sports Medicine recommends moderate to high load resistance training. However, use of moderate to high loads are often not feasible in clinical populations. Therefore, the emergence of low load (LL) blood flow restriction (BFR) training as a rehabilitation tool for clinical populations is becoming popular. Although the majority of research on LL-BFR training has examined healthy populations, clinical applications are emerging. Overall, it appears BFR training is a safe and effective tool for rehabilitation...
2017: International Journal of Exercise Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28956640/are-higher-blood-flow-restriction-pressures-more-beneficial-when-lower-loads-are-used
#13
S J Dankel, M B Jessee, S L Buckner, J G Mouser, K T Mattocks, J P Loenneke
The application of blood flow restriction during low-load resistance exercise has been shown to induce muscle growth with high or low restriction pressures, however, loads lower than 20% one-repetition maximum (1RM) remain unexplored. Fourteen trained individuals completed six elbow flexion protocols involving three different loads (10%, 15%, and 20% 1RM) each of which was performed with either a low (40% arterial occlusion) or high (80% arterial occlusion) pressure. Pre- and post-measurements of surface electromyography (sEMG), isometric torque, and muscle thickness were analyzed...
September 1, 2017: Physiology International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28949007/can-low-load-blood-flow-restriction-training-elicit-muscle-hypertrophy-with-modest-inflammation-and-cellular-stress-but-minimal-muscle-damage
#14
Giselle L Allsopp, Anthony K May
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 15, 2017: Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28883228/paget-schroetter-syndrome-resulting-from-thoracic-outlet-syndrome-and-kaatsu-training
#15
Tatsunori Noto, Go Hashimoto, Takahito Takagi, Toru Awaya, Tadashi Araki, Masanori Shiba, Raisuke Iijima, Hidehiko Hara, Masao Moroi, Masato Nakamura, Kaoru Sugi
A 29-year-old woman who worked as a KAATSU (a type of body exercise that involves blood flow restriction) instructor visited our emergency room with a chief complaint of swelling and left upper limb pain. Chest computed tomography (CT) showed non-uniform contrast images corresponding to the site from the left axillary vein to the left subclavian vein; vascular ultrasonography of the upper limb revealed a thrombotic obstruction at the same site, leading to a diagnosis of Paget-Schroetter syndrome (PSS). We herein report our experience with a case of PSS derived from thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS), in a patient who was a KAATSU instructor...
October 1, 2017: Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28853118/occlusion-training-pilot-study-for-postoperative-lower-extremity-rehabilitation-following-primary-total-knee-arthroplasty
#16
Christopher L Gaunder, Michael P Hawkinson, David J Tennent, Creighton C Tubb
With continued emphasis on the value of healthcare, factors such as quality of life and patient reported outcomes are critical in evaluating high-demand procedures such as knee replacement surgery. Equally important to the surgery itself is maximizing the effectiveness and efficiency of the treatment, both preoperatively and postoperatively, which can have a significant effect the final outcome. Technical outcomes of total knee replacement are generally considered excellent; however, many patients continue to have postoperative pain, functional limitations, and low treatment satisfaction...
July 2017: U.S. Army Medical Department Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28828264/exercise-training-with-dietary-restriction-enhances-circulating-irisin-level-associated-with-increasing-endothelial-progenitor-cell-number-in-obese-adults-an-intervention-study
#17
Junhao Huang, Shen Wang, Fengpeng Xu, Dan Wang, Honggang Yin, Qinhao Lai, Jingwen Liao, Xiaohui Hou, Min Hu
OBJECTIVE: Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) correlate negatively with obesity. Previous studies have shown that exercise significantly restores circulating EPC levels in obese people; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. Recently, irisin has been reported to have a critical role in the regulation of EPCs. This exercise-induced myokine has been demonstrated to play a therapeutic role in obesity. In this study, we hypothesized that the increase in circulating irisin may form a link with increasing EPC levels in obese people after exercise...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28737609/the-effects-of-supplementary-low-load-blood-flow-restriction-training-on-morphological-and-performance-based-adaptations-in-team-sport-athletes
#18
Brendan R Scott, Jeremiah J Peiffer, Paul S R Goods
Scott, BR, Peiffer, JJ, and Goods, PSR. The effects of supplementary low-load blood flow restriction training on morphological and performance-based adaptations in team sport athletes. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2147-2154, 2017-Low-load resistance training with blood flow restriction (BFR) may be a method to enhance muscular development even in trained athletes. This study aimed to assess whether supplemental low-load BFR training can improve muscle size, strength, and physical performance characteristics in team sport athletes...
August 2017: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28706859/role-of-metabolic-stress-for-enhancing-muscle-adaptations-practical-applications
#19
REVIEW
Marcelo Conrado de Freitas, Jose Gerosa-Neto, Nelo Eidy Zanchi, Fabio Santos Lira, Fabrício Eduardo Rossi
Metabolic stress is a physiological process that occurs during exercise in response to low energy that leads to metabolite accumulation [lactate, phosphate inorganic (Pi) and ions of hydrogen (H(+))] in muscle cells. Traditional exercise protocol (i.e., Resistance training) has an important impact on the increase of metabolite accumulation, which influences hormonal release, hypoxia, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell swelling. Changes in acute exercise routines, such as intensity, volume and rest between sets, are determinants for the magnitude of metabolic stress, furthermore, different types of training, such as low-intensity resistance training plus blood flow restriction and high intensity interval training, could be used to maximize metabolic stress during exercise...
June 26, 2017: World Journal of Methodology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28643221/post-exercise-blood-flow-restriction-attenuates-hyperemia-similarly-in-males-and-females
#20
Scott J Dankel, J Grant Mouser, Matthew B Jessee, Kevin T Mattocks, Samuel L Buckner, Jeremy P Loenneke
PURPOSE: Our laboratory recently demonstrated that post-exercise blood flow restriction attenuated muscle hypertrophy only in females, which we hypothesized may be due to alterations in post-exercise blood flow. The aim of this study is to test our previous hypothesis that sex differences in blood flow would exist when employing the same protocol. METHODS: Twenty-two untrained individuals (12 females; 10 males) performed two exercise sessions, each involving one set of elbow flexion exercise to volitional failure on the right arm...
August 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
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