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Blood flow restriction training

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29775118/blood-flow-restricted-resistance-training-in-patients-with-sporadic-inclusion-body-myositis-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#1
A N Jørgensen, P Aagaard, U Frandsen, E Boyle, L P Diederichsen
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of 12 weeks of low-load blood-flow restricted resistance (BFR) training on self-reported and objective physical function, and maximal muscle strength in patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM). METHOD: Twenty-two patients with sIBM were randomized into a training group (BFR group) or a non-exercising control group, according to CONsolidated Standards Of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) guidelines. The BFR group performed 12 weeks of BFR training twice per week...
May 18, 2018: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29768966/mood-effects-of-blood-flow-restriction-resistance-exercise-among-basketball-players
#2
Júlio C G Silva, Rodrigo R Aniceto, Leandro S Oliota-Ribeiro, Gabriel R Neto, Leonardo S Leandro, Maria S Cirilo-Sousa
This study compared the acute effects of resistance exercise with and without blood flow restriction (BFR) on basketball players' mood states. A total of 11 male basketball players (mean age = 19.9, SD = 2.8 years; mean height = 180.8, SD = 7.8 cm; mean weight = 71.1, SD = 9.1 kg; mean body mass index = 22.1, SD = 1.9 kg/m2 ) were randomly assigned to two experimental conditions: (a) low-load resistance exercise with BFR (LLRE + BFR) and high-load resistance exercise (HLRE) without BFR...
January 1, 2018: Perceptual and Motor Skills
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29745735/time-trial-performance-in-elite-speed-skaters-after-remote-ischemic-preconditioning
#3
Philippe Richard, François Billaut
PURPOSE: Speed skating leads to blood-flow restriction and deoxygenation in the lower limbs (especially the right leg) that may affect performance. Although the acute influence of such deoxygenation is not clearly understood, we tested whether remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) could modify muscular oxygenation and improve time-trial performance in that sport. METHODS: Using a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design, 9 elite speed skaters performed 1000-m on-ice time-trials preceded by either RIPC of the upper limbs (3x5-min compression/5-min reperfusion cycles at 30 mmHg > arterial systolic pressure) or SHAM (10 mmHg)...
May 10, 2018: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29701119/does-blood-flow-restriction-training-increase-the-diameter-of-forearm-vessels-in-chronic-kidney-disease-patients-a-randomized-clinical-trial
#4
Jefferson Bn Barbosa, Tuíra O Maia, Priscila S Alves, Shirley D Bezerra, Elaine Csc Moura, Ana Irene C Medeiros, Helen Kb Fuzari, Lívia G Rocha, Patrícia Em Marinho
INTRODUCTION: Blood flow restriction training can be used as an alternative to conventional exercise in chronic kidney disease patients with indication of arteriovenous fistula. OBJECTIVE: Evaluating the efficacy of blood flow restriction training in the diameter and distensibility change of the cephalic vein and the diameter and flow of the radial artery, muscle strength and forearm circumference in chronic kidney disease patients with arteriovenous fistula pre-creation...
April 1, 2018: Journal of Vascular Access
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29650336/acute-physiological-responses-to-low-intensity-blood-flow-restriction-cycling
#5
H J Thomas, B R Scott, J J Peiffer
OBJECTIVES: Blood flow restriction (BFR) during interval cycling may stimulate aerobic and anaerobic adaptations. However, acute physiological responses to BFR interval cycling have not been extensively investigated. DESIGN: Eighteen males completed low-intensity (LI), low-intensity with BFR (LIBFR ) and high-intensity (HI) interval cycling sessions in randomised and counterbalanced order. These included a standardised warm-up and three two-min intervals interspersed with two-min recovery...
April 9, 2018: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29629970/blood-flow-restriction-training-for-postoperative-lower-extremity-weakness-a-report-of-three-cases
#6
David J Tennent, Travis C Burns, Anthony E Johnson, Johnny G Owens, Christina M Hylden
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2018: Current Sports Medicine Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29604268/mild-aerobic-training-with-blood-flow-restriction-increases-the-hypertrophy-index-and-musk-in-both-slow-and-fast-muscles-of-old-rats-role-of-pgc-1%C3%AE
#7
Mohammad-Ali Bahreini Pour, Siyavash Joukar, Fariborz Hovanloo, Hamid Najafipour, Vida Naderi, Alireza Raji, Saeed Esmaeili-Mahani
AIMS: Existing evidence emphasize the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in sarcopenia which is revealed as loss of skeletal muscle mass and neuromuscular junction remodeling. We assessed the effect of low-intensity aerobic training along with blood flow restriction on muscle hypertrophy index, muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), a pivotal protein of the neuromuscular junction and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) in aged male rats. MAIN METHODS: Animals groups were control (CTL), sham (Sh), leg blood flow restriction (BFR), exercise (Ex), sham + exercise (Sh + Ex), and BFR plus exercise (BFR + Ex) groups...
March 28, 2018: Life Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29575714/blood-flow-restricted-exercise-providing-more-bang-for-buck-in-trained-athletes
#8
EDITORIAL
Richard A Ferguson
Blood flow restriction (BFR) has been utilised in physiology for centuries; from William Harvey's (1578-1657) initial use of a tourniquet to describe in detail the systemic circulation of blood, to the use in the last 40 years in the investigation of cardiovascular reflex responses, angiogenesis, skeletal muscle metabolism and fatigue. Recent investigation has largely focussed on the adaptive potential of BFR exercise training, with particular reference to skeletal muscle strength and hypertrophy and its use in the rehabilitation process...
March 25, 2018: Acta Physiologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29570594/acute-neuromuscular-adaptations-in-response-to-low-intensity-blood-flow-restricted-exercise-and-high-intensity-resistance-exercise-are-there-any-differences
#9
Pedro Fatela, Joana F Reis, Goncalo V Mendonca, Tomás Freitas, Maria J Valamatos, Janne Avela, Pedro Mil-Homens
Fatela, P, Reis, JF, Mendonca, GV, Freitas, T, Valamatos, MJ, Avela, J, and Mil-Homens, P. Acute neuromuscular adaptations in response to low-intensity blood flow restricted exercise and high-intensity resistance exercise: are there any differences? J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 902-910, 2018-Numerous studies have reported similar neuromuscular adaptations between low-intensity (LI) blood-flow restricted exercise (BFRE) and high-intensity (HI) resistance training. Unfortunately, none of these experimental designs individualized blood flow restriction (BFR) levels to each participant...
April 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29570573/sexual-dimorphism-in-the-estimation-of-upper-limb-blood-flow-restriction-in-the-seated-position
#10
Afonso Borges, Carolina Teodósio, Pedro Matos, Pedro Mil-Homens, Pedro Pezarat-Correia, Christopher Fahs, Goncalo V Mendonca
Arterial occlusion pressure (AOP) is typically used to normalize blood flow restriction (BFR) during low intensity BFR exercise. Despite strong evidence for sexual dimorphism in muscle blood flow, sex-related differences in AOP estimation remain a controversial topic. We aimed at determining whether the relationship of upper-limb AOP with arm circumference and systolic blood pressure (BP) differs between men and women resting in the seated position. Sixty-two healthy young participants (31 men: 21.7 ± 2.3; 31 women: 22...
March 22, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29565774/muscle-hypertrophy-following-blood-flow-restricted-low-force-isometric-electrical-stimulation-in-rat-tibialis-anterior-role-for-muscle-hypoxia
#11
Toshiaki Nakajima, Seiichiro Koide, Tomohiro Yasuda, Takaaki Hasegawa, Tatsuya Yamasoba, Syotaro Obi, Shigeru Toyoda, Fumitaka Nakamura, Teruo Inoue, David C Poole, Yutaka Kano
Low force exercise training with blood flow restriction (BFR) elicits muscle hypertrophy. We investigated the effects of microvascular hypoxia (i.e., low microvascular O2 partial pressures, PmvO2 ) during contractions on hypertrophic signaling, growth response and key muscle adaptations for increasing exercise capacity. Wistar rats were fitted with a cuff placed around the upper thigh and inflated to restrict limb blood flow. Low force isometric contractions (30 Hz) were evoked via electrical stimulation of the tibialis anterior (TA) nerve...
March 22, 2018: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29535579/neuromuscular-adaptations-to-low-load-blood-flow-restricted-resistance-training
#12
Summer B Cook, Brendan R Scott, Katherine L Hayes, Bethany G Murphy
Low-load blood flow restricted (BFR) resistance exercise has been suggested to be as effective as moderate and high-load resistance training for increasing muscle size and strength. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of 6 weeks of HL or low-load BFR resistance training on neuromuscular function, strength, and hypertrophy of the knee extensors. Eighteen participants aged 18-22 years old were randomized to one of three training groups: moderate load (ML: 70% of 1 repetition maximum [1-RM]); BFR (20% 1-RM with a vascular restriction set to ~180 mmHg); and a control group (CON) that did not exercise...
March 2018: Journal of Sports Science & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29498472/effects-of-blood-flow-restriction-exercises-on-bone-metabolism-a-systematic-review
#13
REVIEW
S T Bittar, P S Pfeiffer, H H Santos, M S Cirilo-Sousa
This study analysed the effect of low-intensity (LI) exercises with blood flow restriction (BFR) on bone metabolism compared with high-intensity (HI) exercises without BFR. The following databases were searched using the keywords therapeutic occlusion training OR BFR training OR vascular occlusion training OR KAATSU training OR ischaemia training AND osteogenesis OR bone biomarkers OR bone metabolic marker OR bone mass OR bone turnover OR osteoporosis OR osteopenia: PubMed, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, Science Direct, Cochrane and Google Scholar...
March 2, 2018: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29477554/blood-flow-restriction-training-after-achilles-tendon-rupture
#14
Bobby G Yow, David J Tennent, Thomas C Dowd, Jeremy P Loenneke, Johnny G Owens
Blood flow restriction (BFR) training is a technique shown to be safe and effective at increasing muscular strength and endurance in healthy fitness populations and is under study for its use in postinjury rehabilitation. BFR stimulates muscular strength and hypertrophy gains at much lower loads than traditional methods, allowing patients to begin the rehabilitation process much sooner. We report on 2 patients who incorporated BFR training into their traditional rehabilitation program after Achilles tendon ruptures...
May 2018: Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery: Official Publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29448855/acute-effects-of-blood-flow-restriction-on-exercise-induced-free-radical-production-in-young-and-healthy-subjects
#15
Christoph Centner, Denise Zdzieblik, Patrick Dressler, Bruno Fink, Albert Gollhofer, Daniel König
The main purpose of this study was to investigate the acute local and systemic effects of low-load resistance exercise (30% 1RM) with partial vascular occlusion on exercise-induced free radical production and to compare these effects with other established training methods. Fifteen young and healthy males (25 ± 3 years) performed the following four sessions in a counterbalanced order on separate days: low-load resistance exercise (LI: 30% 1RM), low-load resistance exercise with blood flow restriction (LIBR: 30% 1RM), high-load resistance exercise (HI: 80% 1RM) and an additional session without exercise but blood flow restriction only (BR)...
March 15, 2018: Free Radical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29446524/impact-of-blood-flow-restricted-bodyweight-exercise-on-skeletal-muscle-adaptations
#16
J E Jakobsgaard, M Christiansen, P Sieljacks, J Wang, T Groennebaek, F de Paoli, K Vissing
This study ascertains the ability of bodyweight blood flow-restricted (BFR) exercise training to promote skeletal muscle adaptations of significance for muscle accretion and metabolism. Six healthy young individuals (three males and three females) performed six weeks of bodyweight BFR training. Each session consisted of five sets of sit-to-stand BFR exercise to volitional failure with 30-second inter-set recovery. Prior to, and at least 72 h after training, muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis to assess changes in fibre type-specific cross-sectional area (CSA), satellite cell (SC) and myonuclei content and capillarization, as well as mitochondrial protein expression...
February 15, 2018: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29393688/systematic-review-of-high-level-mobility-training-in-people-with-a-neurological-impairment
#17
Tanja Spencer, Sara Aldous, Gavin Williams, Michael Fahey
AIM: The objective of this paper was to systematically review the efficacy of interventions targeting high-level mobility skills in people with a neurological impairment. METHODS: A comprehensive electronic database search was conducted. Study designs were graded using the American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM) system and methodological quality was described using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. RESULTS: Twelve exploratory studies (AACPDM levels IV/V), of limited methodological quality (PEDro scores of 2-3 out of 10), were included...
2018: Brain Injury: [BI]
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29350278/lower-body-blood-flow-restriction-training-may-induce-remote-muscle-strength-adaptations-in-an-active-unrestricted-arm
#18
Anthony K May, Aaron P Russell, Stuart A Warmington
PURPOSE: We examined the concurrent characteristics of the remote development of strength and cross-sectional area (CSA) of upper body skeletal muscle in response to lower body resistance training performed with an applied blood flow restriction (BFR). METHODS: Males allocated to an experimental BFR group (EXP; n = 12) or a non-BFR control group (CON; n = 12) completed 7-weeks of resistance training comprising three sets of unilateral bicep curls [50% 1-repetition maximum (1-RM)], then four sets of bilateral knee extension and flexion exercises (30% 1-RM)...
March 2018: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29317069/blood-flow-restriction-training-as-a-prehabilitation-concept-in-total-knee-arthroplasty-a-narrative-review-about-current-preoperative-interventions-and-the-potential-impact-of-bfr
#19
Alexander Franz, Fina Pauline Queitsch, Michael Behringer, Constantin Mayer, Rüdiger Krauspe, Christoph Zilkens
Osteoarthritis of the knee is one of the most commonly diagnosed joint ailments and responsible for increased rates of total knee arthroplasty surgeries worldwide. Whereas the surgical approach is able to diminish the perceived knee pain of concerned patients', the postoperative recovery is often accompanied by persistent skeletal muscle dysfunctions and atrophy, which is responsible for functional deficits for up to several years. Recent findings indicate that surgery induced adverse effects on skeletal muscles are largely associated with the use of pneumatic tourniquets, wherefore several studies try to reduce tourniquet use in orthopedic surgery...
January 2018: Medical Hypotheses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29237062/rumpel-leede-phenomenon-associated-with-blood-flow-restriction-training
#20
Takeshi Kondo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 11, 2017: QJM: Monthly Journal of the Association of Physicians
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