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Blood flow restriction training

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259850/blood-flow-restriction-training-in-clinical-musculoskeletal-rehabilitation-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#1
REVIEW
Luke Hughes, Bruce Paton, Ben Rosenblatt, Conor Gissane, Stephen David Patterson
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Low-load exercise training with blood flow restriction (BFR) can increase muscle strength and may offer an effective clinical musculoskeletal (MSK) rehabilitation tool. The aim of this review was to systematically analyse the evidence regarding the effectiveness of this novel training modality in clinical MSK rehabilitation. DESIGN: This is a systematic review and meta-analysis of peer-reviewed literature examining BFR training in clinical MSK rehabilitation (Research Registry; researchregistry91)...
March 4, 2017: British Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28224640/low-load-resistance-training-with-low-relative-pressure-produces-muscular-changes-similar-to-high-load-resistance-training
#2
Daeyeol Kim, Jeremy P Loenneke, Xin Ye, Debra A Bemben, Travis W Beck, Rebecca D Larson, Michael G Bemben
INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to compare the acute and chronic response of high-load (HL) resistance training to low-load resistance training with a low blood flow restriction (LL-BFR) pressure. METHODS: Participants completed elbow flexion with either HL or LL-BFR, or non-exercise (CON). In the chronic study, participants in the HL and LL-BFR were trained for 8 weeks to determine differences in muscle size and strength. The acute study examined the changes in Pre/Post torque, muscle swelling, and blood lactate...
February 22, 2017: Muscle & Nerve
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28174436/cardiovascular-response-to-bouts-of-exercise-with-blood-flow-restriction
#3
Kestutis Bunevicius, Arturas Sujeta, Kristina Poderiene, Birute Zachariene, Viktoras Silinskas, Rimantas Minkevicius, Jonas Poderys
[Purpose] Occlusion training with low-intensity resistance exercises and blood flow restriction increases muscle cross-sectional area and strength. This form of training is used in rehabilitation; therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of one occlusion training session on the cardiovascular response to bouts of exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Two groups took part: a control group without blood flow restriction and an experimental group with blood flow restriction. A single training session was used with the exercise intensity set at 40% of the one repetition maximum...
December 2016: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28143367/does-a-resistance-exercise-session-with-continuous-or-intermittent-blood-flow-restriction-promote-muscle-damage-and-increase-oxidative-stress
#4
Gabriel R Neto, Jefferson S Novaes, Verônica P Salerno, Michel M Gonçalves, Gilmário R Batista, Maria S Cirilo-Sousa
The aim of this study was to compare the effect of low-load resistance exercise (LLRE) with continuous and intermittent blood flow restriction (BFR) on the creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), protein carbonyl (PC), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) and uric acid (UA) levels in military men. The study included 10 recreationally trained men aged 19 ± 0.82 years who underwent the following experimental protocols in random order on separate days (72-96 h): 4 LLRE sessions at a 20% 1RM (one-repetition maximum [1RM]) with continuous BFR (LLRE + CBFR); 4 LLRE sessions at 20% 1RM with intermittent BFR (LLRE + IBFR) and 4 high-intensity resistance exercise (HIRE) sessions at 80% 1RM...
January 31, 2017: Journal of Sports Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28143359/the-role-of-blood-flow-restriction-training-for-applied-practitioners-a-questionnaire-based-survey
#5
Stephen D Patterson, Christopher R Brandner
The purpose of the study was to investigate the current use of blood flow restriction (BFR) by practitioners during exercise/training. A questionnaire was developed and data were obtained from 250 participants, with 115 stating that they had prescribed BFR as an intervention. The most common exercise intervention used in combination with BFR was resistance exercise (99/115), followed by during passive (30/115) conditions, and during aerobic exercise (22/115). The main outcome measure for using the technique was to increase muscle mass (32...
February 1, 2017: Journal of Sports Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28127587/corticospinal-excitability-changes-following-blood-flow-restriction-training-of-the-tibialis-anterior-a-preliminary-study
#6
Erhard Trillingsgaard Næss-Schmidt, Morten Morthorst, Asger Roer Pedersen, Jørgen Feldbæk Nielsen, Peter William Stubbs
AIM: To examine the neural excitability of projections to the tibialis anterior (TA) following blood flow restriction training (BFRT). This is the first study to examine the TA following BFRT. METHODS: Ten subjects performed each experiment. Experiment one consisted of BFRT at 130 mmHg (BFRT-low). Experiment two consisted of BFRT at 200 mmHg (BFRT-high), training (TR-only) and blood flow restriction at 200 mmHg (BFR-only) performed on separate days. Blood flow restriction was applied to the thigh and training consisted of rapid dorsiflexion contractions against gravity every 10 s for 15-min...
January 2017: Heliyon
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28121802/delayed-effect-of-blood-flow-restricted-resistance-training-on-rapid-force-capacity
#7
Jakob Lindberg Nielsen, Ulrik Frandsen, Tatyana Prokhorova, Rune Dueholm Bech, Tobias Nygaard, Charlotte Suetta, Per Aagaard
PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect and time course of high-frequent low-load resistance training with blood-flow restriction (BFR) on rapid force capacity (i.e. rate of torque development (RTD)). METHODS: Ten male subjects (22.8±2.3 years) performed four sets of knee extensor exercise (20%1RM) to concentric failure during concurrent BFR of the thigh (100mmHg), while eight work-matched controls (21.9±3.0 years) trained without BFR (CON)...
January 23, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28118308/delayed-onset-muscle-soreness-and-perceived-exertion-following-blood-flow-restriction-exercise
#8
Christopher R Brandner, Stuart A Warmington
The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptual responses to resistance exercise with either heavy-loads (80% 1 repetition maximum [1-RM]), light-loads (20% 1-RM), or light-loads in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR). Despite the use of light-loads, it has been suggested that the adoption of BFR resistance exercise may be limited due to increases in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and perceived exertion. Seventeen healthy untrained males participated in this balanced, randomized cross-over study...
January 11, 2017: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28093857/can-blood-flow-restriction-augment-muscle-activation-during-high-load-training
#9
Scott J Dankel, Samuel L Buckner, Matthew B Jessee, Kevin T Mattocks, J Grant Mouser, Brittany R Counts, Gilberto C Laurentino, Jeremy P Loenneke
INTRODUCTION: Blood flow restriction has been shown to augment muscle activation and increase muscle size when combined with low-load training; however, much less is known on whether blood flow restriction can augment muscle activation during high-load exercise. PURPOSE: To determine whether applying blood flow restriction can augment muscle activation with traditional high-load resistance exercise. METHOD: Ten individuals completed two sets of elbow flexion exercise to volitional fatigue...
January 16, 2017: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088558/the-effects-of-upper-body-exercise-across-different-levels-of-blood-flow-restriction-on-arterial-occlusion-pressure-and-perceptual-responses
#10
Kevin T Mattocks, Matthew B Jessee, Brittany R Counts, Samuel L Buckner, J Grant Mouser, Scott J Dankel, Gilberto C Laurentino, Jeremy P Loenneke
Recent studies have investigated relative pressures that are applied during blood flow restriction exercise ranging from 40%-90% of resting arterial occlusion pressure; however, no studies have investigated relative pressures below 40% arterial occlusion pressure. The purpose of this study was to characterize the cardiovascular and perceptual responses to different levels of pressures. Twenty-six resistance trained participants performed four sets of unilateral elbow flexion exercise using 30% of their 1RM in combination with blood flow restriction inflated to one of six relative applied pressures (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 50%, 90% arterial occlusion pressure)...
January 11, 2017: Physiology & Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27941491/low-intensity-sprint-training-with-blood-flow-restriction-improves-100-m-dash
#11
M Behringer, D Behlau, J Montag, M McCourt, J Mester
PURPOSE: We investigated the effects of practical blood flow restriction (pBFR) of leg muscles during sprint training on the 100 m dash time in well-trained sport students. METHODS: Participants performed 6x100 m sprints at 60-70% of their maximal 100 m sprinting speed twice a week for 6 weeks, either with (IG; n=12) or without pBFR (CG; n=12). RESULTS: The 100 m dash time significantly decreased more in the IG (-0.38±0.24 s) than in the CG (-0...
November 25, 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837041/acute-effects-of-resistance-exercise-with-continuous-and-intermittent-blood-flow-restriction-on-hemodynamic-measurements-and-perceived-exertion
#12
Gabriel R Neto, Jefferson S Novaes, Verônica P Salerno, Michel M Gonçalves, Bruna K L Piazera, Thais Rodrigues-Rodrigues, Maria S Cirilo-Sousa
This study compared the acute effects of low-intensity resistance exercise (RE) sessions for the upper limb with continuous and intermittent blood flow restriction (BFR) and high-intensity RE with no BFR on lactate, heart rate, double product (DP; heart rate times systolic blood pressure), and perceived exertion (RPE). Ten recreationally trained men (1-5 years strength training; age mean = 19 ± 0.82 years) performed three experimental protocols in random order: (a) low-intensity RE at 20% one-repetition maximum (1RM) with intermittent BFR (LI + IBFR), (b) low-intensity RE at 20% 1RM with continuous BFR (LI + CBFR), and (c) high-intensity RE at 80% 1RM...
November 11, 2016: Perceptual and Motor Skills
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27826654/physiological-responses-to-interval-endurance-exercise-at-different-levels-of-blood-flow-restriction
#13
Rogério B Corvino, Harry B Rossiter, Thiago Loch, Jéssica C Martins, Fabrizio Caputo
PURPOSE: We aimed to identify a blood flow restriction (BFR) endurance exercise protocol that would both maximize cardiopulmonary and metabolic strain, and minimize the perception of effort. METHODS: Twelve healthy males (23 ± 2 years, 75 ± 7 kg) performed five different exercise protocols in randomized order: HI, high-intensity exercise starting at 105% of the incremental peak power (P peak); I-BFR30, intermittent BFR at 30% P peak; C-BFR30, continuous BFR at 30% P peak; CON30, control exercise without BFR at 30% P peak; I-BFR0, intermittent BFR during unloaded exercise...
November 8, 2016: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27767984/the-optimum-hematocrit
#14
Walter H Reinhart
The hematocrit (Hct) determines the oxygen carrying capacity of blood, but also increases blood viscosity and thus flow resistance. From this dual role the concept of an optimum Hct for tissue oxygenation has been derived. Viscometric studies using the ratio Hct/blood viscosity at high shear rate showed an optimum Hct of 50-60% for red blood cell (RBC) suspensions in plasma. For the perfusion of an artificial microvascular network with 5-70μm channels the optimum Hct was 60-70% for high driving pressures. With lower shear rates or driving pressures the optimum Hct shifted towards lower values...
2016: Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27749358/blood-flow-restriction-training-after-knee-arthroscopy-a-randomized-controlled-pilot-study
#15
David J Tennent, Christina M Hylden, Anthony E Johnson, Travis C Burns, Jason M Wilken, Johnny G Owens
INTRODUCTION: Quadriceps strength after arthroscopic knee procedures is frequently diminished several years postoperation. Blood flow restriction (BFR) training uses partial venous occlusion while performing submaximal exercise to induce muscle hypertrophy and strength improvements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate BFR as a postoperative therapeutic intervention after knee arthroscopy. METHODS: A randomized controlled pilot study comparing physical therapy with and without BFR after knee arthroscopy was conducted...
October 5, 2016: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27730736/let-s-talk-about-sex-where-are-the-young-females-in-blood-flow-restriction-research
#16
REVIEW
Brittany R Counts, Lindy M Rossow, Kevin T Mattocks, J Grant Mouser, Matthew B Jessee, Samuel L Buckner, Scott J Dankel, Jeremy P Loenneke
Low-load resistance exercise with the blood flow restriction (BFR) has been shown to increase muscle size similar to that of traditional high-load resistance training. Throughout the BFR literature, there is a vast difference between the quantity of young females included in the literature compared to young males, older males and older females. Therefore, the purpose of this minireview is to discuss the underrepresentation of young females in the BFR literature and review the potential physiologic reasons as to why they may have been excluded...
October 11, 2016: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27726197/acute-and-long-term-effects-of-blood-flow-restricted-training-on-heat-shock-proteins-and-endogenous-antioxidant-systems
#17
K T Cumming, S Ellefsen, B R Rønnestad, I Ugelstad, T Raastad
Blood flow restricted exercise (BFRE) with low loads has been demonstrated to induce considerable stress to exercising muscles. Muscle cells have developed a series of defensive systems against exercise-induced stress. However, little is known about acute and long-term effects of BFRE training on these systems. Nine previously untrained females trained low-load BFRE and heavy load strength training (HLS) on separate legs and on separate days to investigate acute and long-term effects on heat shock proteins (HSP) and endogenous antioxidant systems in skeletal muscles...
October 10, 2016: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27634603/blood-flow-restricted-exercise-compared-to-high-load-resistance-exercise-during-unloading
#18
Kyle J Hackney, Meghan E Downs, Lori Ploutz-Snyder
BACKGROUND: Bed rest studies have shown that high load (HL) resistance training can mitigate the loss of muscle size and strength during musculoskeletal unloading; however, not all individuals are able to perform HL resistance exercise. Blood flow restricted (BFR) resistance exercise may be a novel way to prevent maladaptation to unloading without requiring HL exercise equipment. This study evaluated the muscular training adaptations to HL and BFR resistance training during unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS), a human limb unloading model...
August 2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27613141/transcriptional-profiling-of-rat-skeletal-muscle-hypertrophy-under-restriction-of-blood-flow
#19
Shouyu Xu, Xueyun Liu, Zhenhuang Chen, Gaoquan Li, Qin Chen, Guoqing Zhou, Ruijie Ma, Xinmiao Yao, Xiao Huang
Blood flow restriction (BFR) under low-intensity resistance training (LIRT) can produce similar effects upon muscles to that of high-intensity resistance training (HIRT) while overcoming many of the restrictions to HIRT that occurs in a clinical setting. However, the potential molecular mechanisms of BFR induced muscle hypertrophy remain largely unknown. Here, using a BFR rat model, we aim to better elucidate the mechanisms regulating muscle hypertrophy as induced by BFR and reveal possible clinical therapeutic targets for atrophy cases...
December 15, 2016: Gene
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27584237/blood-flow-restriction-increases-metabolic-stress-but-decreases-muscle-activation-during-high-intensity-resistance-training-623-board-4-june-1-1-00-pm-3-00-pm
#20
Renato Barroso, Emerson Teixeira, Carla Silva-Batista, Gilberto Laurentino, Hamilton Roschel, Carlos Ugrinowitsch, Valmor Tricoli
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
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