keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

reversal rivaroxaban

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29768672/catheter-ablation-for-atrial-fibrillation-on-uninterrupted-direct-oral-anticoagulants-a-safe-approach
#1
V Sawhney, M Shaukat, E Volkova, N Jones, R Providencia, S Honarbakhsh, G Dhillon, A Chow, M Lowe, P Lambiase, M Dhinoja, S Sporton, M J Earley, R J Schilling, R J Hunter
BACKGROUND: Current consensus guidelines suggest DOACs are interrupted peri-procedurally for catheter ablation (CA) of AF. However, this may predispose patients to thromboembolic complications. This study investigates the safety of CA for AF on uninterrupted DOACs compared to uninterrupted warfarin. METHODS: Single centre, retrospective study of consecutive patients undergoing CA for AF. All patients were heparinised prior to trans-septal puncture with a target activated clotting time (ACT) of 300-350 seconds...
May 16, 2018: Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology: PACE
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29710221/what-surgeons-should-know-about-non-vitamin-k-oral-anticoagulants-a-review
#2
Atul Verma, Andrew C T Ha, James T Rutka, Subodh Verma
Importance: Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are increasingly prescribed for patients to treat or prevent arterial or venous thromboembolism. The following 4 NOAC agents are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for clinical use: dabigatran etexilate, apixaban, edoxaban tosylate, and rivaroxaban. A good understanding of these agents' pharmacologic properties is important for surgeons given their marked differences compared with warfarin sodium. This review highlights key practical issues surrounding the use of NOACs in the perioperative setting...
April 18, 2018: JAMA Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29707095/a-case-of-a-reversible-neurologic-adverse-reaction-to-apixaban-confirmed-by-re-challenge
#3
James A Josyln, Furqan H Khattak, Stephen A Geraci
Post-marketing reporting of adverse drug events is essential for new medications, as pre-FDA approval studies lack sufficient subject numbers to detect signals for rare events. Prescriptions for the novel oral anticoagulant factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) have equaled or exceeded those for vitamin K antagonists in many clinical settings requiring chronic anticoagulation, and those of injectable heparins for deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis. We report the case of a 60-year-old woman followed for permanent atrial fibrillation who was prescribed apixaban...
June 2018: Journal of Clinical Medicine Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681563/prothrombin-complex-concentrate-and-fatal-thrombotic-adverse-events-a-complication-to-keep-in-mind
#4
Rabih Tabet, Youssef Shammaa, Boutros Karam, Harout Yacoub, James Lafferty
Thromboembolic events such as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are well-known complications that can occur after prothrombin complex concentrate therapy. However, acute myocardial infarction is a very rare but potentially life-threatening complication that was exclusively described in patients with bleeding disorders who received chronic and recurrent concentrate infusions. We report the case of a 70 year-old male patient with cholangiocarcinoma who was admitted to our hospital with worsening fatigue and weakness...
April 23, 2018: Drug Discoveries & Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29576106/emergency-care-of-patients-receiving-non-vitamin-k-antagonist-oral-anticoagulants
#5
REVIEW
J W Eikelboom, S Kozek-Langenecker, A Exadaktylos, A Batorova, Z Boda, F Christory, I Gornik, G Kėkštas, A Kher, R Komadina, O Koval, G Mitic, T Novikova, E Pazvanska, S Ratobilska, J Sütt, A Winder, D Zateyshchikov
Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which inhibit thrombin (dabigatran) and factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) have been introduced in several clinical indications. Although NOACs have a favourable benefit-risk profile and can be used without routine laboratory monitoring, they are associated-as any anticoagulant-with a risk of bleeding. In addition, treatment may need to be interrupted in patients who need surgery or other procedures. The objective of this article, developed by a multidisciplinary panel of experts in thrombosis and haemostasis, is to provide an update on the management of NOAC-treated patients who experience a bleeding episode or require an urgent procedure...
April 2018: British Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29564837/prothrombin-complex-concentrate-for-major-bleeding-on-factor-xa-inhibitors-a-prospective-cohort-study
#6
Sam Schulman, Peter L Gross, Bruce Ritchie, Susan Nahirniak, Yulia Lin, Lani Lieberman, Marc Carrier, Mark A Crowther, Indy Ghosh, Alejandro Lazo-Langner, Michelle Zondag
Oral factor Xa inhibitors are increasingly used for anticoagulation, but there is no approved reversal agent. Prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) for the management of Xa-inhibitor-associated bleeding has been described in small case series and one cohort study. Patients on apixaban or rivaroxaban, suffering a major bleed, were treated at nine Canadian hospitals as per existing hospital protocol with a fixed dose of PCC 2,000 units and subsequently recruited for a 30-day follow-up. The treating physician evaluated the haemostatic effectiveness as observed during the first day as good, moderate or poor/none, using an assessment guide...
March 21, 2018: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29507024/spontaneous-splenic-rupture-due-to-rivaroxaban
#7
Vinayak Nagaraja, Greg Cranney, Virag Kushwaha
In the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disease, novel oral anticoagulants have emerged as alternatives to warfarin. A major challenge continues to be the reversal of their anticoagulant effect in the case of life-threatening haemorrhagic complications. We report a case of spontaneous splenic rupture treated by splenic artery embolisation in a 77-year-old woman who was anticoagulated with rivaroxaban.
March 5, 2018: BMJ Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29494368/pharmacologic-reversal-of-direct-oral-anticoagulants
#8
Nicholas Farina, James T Miller
Direct oral anticoagulants are becoming increasingly popular in outpatient use. These medications have lacked specific reversal agents. However, this is changing. The Federal Food and Drug Administration approved idarucizumab for reversal of dabigatran in 2016, and another agent, andexanet alfa, is currently in clinical trials for reversal of rivaroxaban and apixaban. This article examines the efficacy and safety of these emerging reversal agents, as well as other historical agents for reversal of direct oral anticoagulants...
April 2018: Critical Care Nursing Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29493031/review-an-overview-and-analysis-of-novel-oral-anticoagulants-and-their-dental-implications
#9
REVIEW
Kevin Fortier, Deepti Shroff, Uday N Reebye
BACKGROUND: Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban are approved novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) as alternatives to Vitamin K antagonists (VKA). Physicians are prescribing an ever-increasing amount these drugs to their patients due to various advantages over existing medications. AIMS: The objective of this review is to provide the dental professional with current literature surrounding the emergence of NOACs, as well as various case studies on the subject, in an effort to guide clinical decision making regarding these medications...
June 2018: Gerodontology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29455019/ocular-myasthenia-induced-by-rivaroxaban-in-patient-with-deep-vein-thrombosis
#10
Enrique M San Norberto, Irene García-Saiz, Diana Gutiérrez, Liliana Domingos, Carlos Vaquero
The non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban is indicated in prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). A 60-year-old male patient complained of bilateral ptosis after administration of rivaroxaban for deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Myasthenia gravis (MG) was confirmed by positive serum antiacetylcholine receptor antibody test. No mediastinal thymoma was found. The ocular myasthenia reversed after discontinuing rivaroxaban treatment. Nevertheless, ptosis recurred and chronic oral pyridostigmine bromide treatment was necessary...
May 2018: Annals of Vascular Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29437014/drug-induced-epistaxis-an-often-neglected-adverse-effect
#11
Sara Meirinho, Ricardo Relvas, Gilberto Alves
BACKGROUND: Epistaxis is an active nose bleeding with a population occurrence of approximately 60%. Although epistaxis is a common clinical complaint, the majority of the cases are benign and caused by local induced factors (e.g., trauma and local inflammation). Nevertheless, it is also recognised that epistaxis can be induced after some drugs intake. AIMS: Due to the increasing use of drugs or drug combinations that potentially may induce epistaxis, this review aims to alert healthcare professionals for this often neglected adverse drug effect and its possible complications...
February 12, 2018: Current Drug Safety
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29395759/evaluation-of-activated-charcoal-and-lipid-emulsion-treatment-in-model-of-acute-rivaroxaban-toxicity
#12
Sinan Cem Uzunget, Togay Evrin, Sezen Baglan Uzunget, Zamir Kemal Ertürk, Egemen Akıncıoğlu, Saffet Özdemir, Atila Korkmaz
AIM: Reducing or reversing the toxicity effects of new oral anticoagulants is an important question.The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of lipid emulsion (LE) and Activated Charcoal (AC) therapy on the intoxication of rivaroxaban, on mice. METHODS: Adult male Balb/c mice weighing approximately 30g were used in the study. Seven groups were assigned, with six mice in each group. Groups were defined; given only rivaroxaban, given only LE, given only AC, after the administration of rivaroxaban LE applied group in the 1st hour, after the administration of rivaroxaban LE applied group in the 3rd hour, after the administration of rivaroxaban AC applied group in the1st hour, after the administration of rivaroxaban AC applied group in the 1st hour and LE applied group in the 3rd hour...
December 14, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29394504/rivaroxaban-plasma-levels-in-acute-ischemic-stroke-and-intracerebral-hemorrhage
#13
David J Seiffge, Georg Kägi, Patrik Michel, Urs Fischer, Yannick Béjot, Susanne Wegener, Marialuisa Zedde, Guillaume Turc, Charlotte Cordonnier, Peter S Sandor, Gilles Rodier, Andrea Zini, Manuel Cappellari, Sabine Schädelin, Alexandros A Polymeris, David Werring, Sebastian Thilemann, Ilaria Maestrini, Eivind Berge, Christopher Traenka, Jochen Vehoff, Gian Marco De Marchis, Monika Kapauer, Nils Peters, Gaia Sirimarco, Leo H Bonati, Marcel Arnold, Philippe A Lyrer, Emmanuel De Maistre, Andreas Luft, Dimtrios A Tsakiris, Stefan T Engelter
OBJECTIVE: Information about rivaroxaban plasma level (RivLev) may guide treatment decisions in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) taking rivaroxaban. METHODS: In a multicenter registry-based study (Novel Oral Anticoagulants in Stroke Patients collaboration; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02353585) of patients with stroke while taking rivaroxaban, we compared RivLev in patients with AIS and ICH. We determined how many AIS patients had RivLev ≤ 100ng/ml, indicating possible eligibility for thrombolysis, and how many ICH patients had RivLev ≥ 75ng/ml, making them possibly eligible for the use of specific reversal agents...
March 2018: Annals of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29348918/safety-and-timing-of-resuming-dabigatran-after-major-gastrointestinal-bleeding-reversed-by-idarucizumab
#14
Gian Galeazzo Riario Sforza, Francesco Gentile, Fabio Stock, Francesco Caggiano, Enrica Chiocca, Cristoforo Incorvaia
The recent introduction of direct oral anticoagulants, including rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban, and edoxaban, for the acute treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism and in atrial fibrillation has been shown to provide greater clinical benefit than oral vitamin K antagonists. However, direct oral anticoagulants are associated with adverse events, the most common being major bleeding; such events require the reversal of the anticoagulant effects by specific agents. In this case report, we describe an 87-year-old female with atrial fibrillation treated with dabigatran who had massive rectal bleeding...
2018: SAGE Open Medical Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29345686/reversal-agents-for-non-vitamin-k-antagonist-oral-anticoagulants
#15
REVIEW
Jerrold H Levy, James Douketis, Jeffrey I Weitz
The non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) include dabigatran, which inhibits thrombin, and apixaban, betrixaban, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, which inhibit coagulation factor Xa. Although clinical studies of NOACs were conducted without antidotes, patient outcomes with major bleeding when receiving NOACs were no worse than those in patients treated with a vitamin K antagonist. Nonetheless, in patients with life-threatening bleeding or requiring urgent surgery, the capacity for rapid NOAC reversal is likely to increase patient safety...
January 18, 2018: Nature Reviews. Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29344007/four-factor-prothrombin-complex-concentrate-improves-thrombin-generation-and-prothrombin-time-in-patients-with-bleeding-complications-related-to-rivaroxaban-a-single-center-pilot-trial
#16
Bettina Schenk, Stephanie Goerke, Ronny Beer, Raimund Helbok, Dietmar Fries, Mirjam Bachler
Background: Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) pose a great challenge for physicians in life-threatening bleeding events. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of reversing the DOAC rivaroxaban using four-factor PCC (prothrombin complex concentrate), a non-specific reversing agent. Methods: Patients with life-threatening bleeding events during rivaroxaban treatment were included and administered 25 U kg-1 of PCC. Blood samples were collected immediately prior to as well as after PCC treatment at predefined time intervals...
2018: Thrombosis Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297661/the-role-of-direct-oral-anticoagulants-in-the-management-of-venous-thromboembolism
#17
Taylor Steuber
Appropriate treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is critical to minimizing long-term morbidity and mortality. The emergence of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) has provided clinicians with expanded therapeutic options for patients with VTE, and as a result, updated practice guidelines released by the American College of Chest Physicians favor DOACs over traditional anticoagulants, such as warfarin. The newest DOAC, betrixaban, received FDA approval in 2017, with an indication for VTE prophylaxis in hospitalized adults...
December 2017: American Journal of Managed Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29250278/the-nonvitamin-k-antagonist-oral-anticoagulants-and-atrial-fibrillation-challenges-and-considerations
#18
REVIEW
Anna Plitt, Sameer Bansilal
The nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban are used for the reduction of the risk of stroke or systemic embolism (SEE) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). The purpose of this review is to highlight the safety and efficacy results of the pivotal NOAC clinical trials for use in NVAF, discuss some of the unique management challenges in the use of NOACs in special populations, summarize data on emerging and novel indications, and address potential future directions...
February 2017: Journal of Atrial Fibrillation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29181265/off-label-use-of-direct-oral-anticoagulants-for-left-ventricular-thrombus-is-it-appropriate
#19
George Degheim, Abeer Berry, Marcel Zughaib
A 57 year old gentleman with a history of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation presented with worsening lower extremity edema and dyspnea on exertion. He had been compliant with his medications including rivaroxaban (Xarelto) for atrial fibrillation that he takes with the evening meal daily. His echocardiogram showed an ejection fraction of 10-15% and a new left ventricle (LV) apical thrombus. During his hospital stay, he developed right sided weakness. Magnetic Resonance Imaging showed a subacute infarct involving the left parietal lobe...
2017: American Journal of Cardiovascular Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29106076/rivaroxaban-reversal-with-prothrombin-complex-concentrate-or-tranexamic-acid-in-healthy-volunteers
#20
J H Levy, K T Moore, M D Neal, D Schneider, V S Marcsisin, J Ariyawansa, J I Weitz
Essentials Specific reversal agents for managing severe factor Xa inhibitor-associated bleeding are lacking. We assessed 4-factor-prothrombin complex concentrate (4F-PCC) and tranexamic acid (TXA). 4F-PCC, but not TXA, reduced the prothrombin time and increased endogenous thrombin potential. These agents may be viable options for reversal of therapeutic doses of rivaroxaban. SUMMARY: Background Oral activated factor X inhibitors such as rivaroxaban are widely used, but specific reversal agents are lacking...
January 2018: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis: JTH
keyword
keyword
46196
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"