keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Ryr1

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543167/a-novel-homozygous-splice-site-mutation-in-ryr1-causes-fetal-hydrops-and-affects-skeletal-and-smooth-muscle-development
#1
Nicole Meier, Elisabeth Bruder, Isabel Filges
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 24, 2017: Prenatal Diagnosis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28538150/lanthanides-report-calcium-sensor-in-the-vestibule-of-ryanodine-receptor
#2
Sándor Sárközi, István Komáromi, István Jóna, János Almássy
Ca(2+) regulates ryanodine receptor's (RyR) activity through an activating and an inhibiting Ca(2+)-binding site located on the cytoplasmic side of the RyR channel. Their altered sensitivity plays an important role in the pathology of malignant hyperthermia and heart failure. We used lanthanide ions (Ln(3+)) as probes to investigate the Ca(2+) sensors of RyR, because they specifically bind to Ca(2+)-binding proteins and they are impermeable to the channel. Eu(3+)'s and Sm(3+)'s action was tested on single RyR1 channels reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers...
May 23, 2017: Biophysical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28536302/a-cryo-em-based-model-of-phosphorylation-and-fkbp12-6-mediated-allosterism-of-the-cardiac-ryanodine-receptor
#3
Sonali Dhindwal, Joshua Lobo, Vanessa Cabra, Demetrio J Santiago, Ashok R Nayak, Kelly Dryden, Montserrat Samsó
Type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) are calcium channels that play a vital role in triggering cardiac muscle contraction by releasing calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum into the cytoplasm. Several cardiomyopathies are associated with the abnormal functioning of RyR2. We determined the three-dimensional structure of rabbit RyR2 in complex with the regulatory protein FKBP12.6 in the closed state at 11.8 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy and built an atomic model of RyR2. The heterogeneity in the data set revealed two RyR2 conformations that we proposed to be related to the extent of phosphorylation of the P2 domain...
May 23, 2017: Science Signaling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28527222/functional-characterization-of-c-terminal-ryanodine-receptor-1-variants-associated-with-central-core-disease-or-malignant-hyperthermia
#4
Remai Parker, Anja H Schiemann, Elaine Langton, Terasa Bulger, Neil Pollock, Andrew Bjorksten, Robyn Gillies, David Hutchinson, Richard Roxburgh, Kathryn M Stowell
BACKGROUND: Central core disease and malignant hyperthermia are human disorders of skeletal muscle resulting from aberrant Ca2+ handling. Most malignant hyperthermia and central core disease cases are associated with amino acid changes in the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the skeletal muscle Ca2+-release channel. Malignant hyperthermia exhibits a gain-of-function phenotype, and central core disease results from loss of channel function. For a variant to be classified as pathogenic, functional studies must demonstrate a correlation with the pathophysiology of malignant hyperthermia or central core disease...
May 15, 2017: Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508509/investigating-the-inter-subunit-subdomain-interactions-and-motions-relevant-to-disease-mutations-in-the-n-terminal-domain-of-ryanodine-receptors-by-molecular-dynamics-simulation
#5
Wenjun Zheng, Zheng Liu
The ryanodine receptors (RyR) are essential to calcium signaling in striated muscles, and numerous disease mutations have been identified in two RyR isoforms, RyR1 in skeletal muscle and RyR2 in cardiac muscle. A deep understanding of the activation/regulation mechanisms of RyRs has been hampered by the shortage of high-resolution structures and dynamic information for this giant tetrameric complex in different functional states. Toward elucidating the molecular mechanisms of disease mutations in RyRs, we performed molecular dynamics simulation of the N-terminal domain (NTD) which is not only the best-resolved structural component of RyRs, but also a hotspot of disease mutations...
May 15, 2017: Proteins
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28499500/ca-2-release-channels-join-the-resolution-revolution
#6
REVIEW
Ran Zalk, Andrew R Marks
Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are calcium release channels expressed in the sarcoendoplasmic reticula of many cell types including cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. In recent years Ca(2+) leak through RyRs has been implicated as a major contributor to the development of diseases including heart failure, muscle myopathies, Alzheimer's disease, and diabetes, making it an important therapeutic target. Recent mammalian RyR1 cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of multiple functional states have clarified longstanding questions including the architecture of the transmembrane (TM) pore and cytoplasmic domains, the location and architecture of the channel gate, ligand-binding sites, and the gating mechanism...
May 9, 2017: Trends in Biochemical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28496993/successful-application-of-whole-genome-sequencing-in-a-medical-genetics-clinic
#7
David Bick, Pamela C Fraser, Michael F Gutzeit, Jeremy M Harris, Tina M Hambuch, Daniel C Helbling, Howard J Jacob, Juliet N Kersten, Steven R Leuthner, Thomas May, Paula E North, Sasha Z Prisco, Bryce A Schuler, Mary Shimoyama, Kimberly A Strong, Scott K Van Why, Regan Veith, James Verbsky, Arthur M Weborg, Brandon M Wilk, Rodney E Willoughby, Elizabeth A Worthey, David P Dimmock
A pilot program was initiated using whole genome sequencing (WGS) to diagnose suspected genetic disorders in the Genetics Clinic at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. Twenty-two patients underwent WGS between 2010 and 2013. Initially, we obtained a 14% (3/22) diagnosis rate over 2 years; with subsequent reanalysis, this increased to 36% (8/22). Disease causing variants were identified in SKIV2L, CECR1, DGKE, PYCR2, RYR1, PDGFRB, EFTUD2, and BCS1L. In 75% (6/8) of diagnosed cases, the diagnosis affected treatment and/or medical surveillance...
June 2017: Journal of Pediatric Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28465322/strenuous-exercise-triggers-a-life-threatening-response-in-mice-susceptible-to-malignant-hyperthermia
#8
Antonio Michelucci, Cecilia Paolini, Simona Boncompagni, Marta Canato, Carlo Reggiani, Feliciano Protasi
In humans, hyperthermic episodes can be triggered by halogenated anesthetics [malignant hyperthermia (MH) susceptibility] and by high temperature [environmental heat stroke (HS)]. Correlation between MH susceptibility and HS is supported by extensive work in mouse models that carry a mutation in ryanodine receptor type-1 (RYR1(Y522S/WT)) and knockout of calsequestrin-1 (CASQ1-null), 2 proteins that control Ca(2+) release in skeletal muscle. As overheating episodes in humans have also been described during exertion, here we subjected RYR1(Y522S/WT) and CASQ1-null mice to an exertional-stress protocol (incremental running on a treadmill at 34°C and 40% humidity)...
May 2, 2017: FASEB Journal: Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28445755/mapping-ryanodine-binding-sites-in-the-pore-cavity-of-ryanodine-receptors
#9
Van A Ngo, Laura L Perissinotti, Williams Miranda, S R Wayne Chen, Sergei Y Noskov
Ryanodine (Ryd) irreversibly targets ryanodine receptors (RyRs), a family of intracellular calcium release channels essential for many cellular processes ranging from muscle contraction to learning and memory. Little is known of the atomistic details about how Ryd binds to RyRs. In this study, we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with both enhanced and bidirectional sampling to gain direct insights into how Ryd interacts with major residues in RyRs that were experimentally determined to be critical for its binding...
April 25, 2017: Biophysical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28403410/assessing-the-pathogenicity-of-ryr1-variants-in-malignant-hyperthermia
#10
A Merritt, P Booms, M-A Shaw, D M Miller, C Daly, J G Bilmen, K M Stowell, P D Allen, D S Steele, P M Hopkins
Background: . Missense variants in the ryanodine receptor 1 gene ( RYR1 ) are associated with malignant hyperthermia but only a minority of these have met the criteria for use in predictive DNA diagnosis. We examined the utility of a simplified method of segregation analysis and a functional assay for determining the pathogenicity of recurrent RYR1 variants associated with malignant hyperthermia. Methods: . We identified previously uncharacterised RYR1 variants found in four or more malignant hyperthermia families and conducted simplified segregation analyses...
April 1, 2017: British Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28387457/dampened-activity-of-ryanodine-receptor-channels-in-mutant-skeletal-muscle-lacking-tric-a
#11
Sam El-Ajouz, Elisa Venturi, Katja Witschas, Matthew Beech, Abigail D Wilson, Chris Lindsay, David Eberhardt, Fiona O'Brien, Tsunaki Iida, Miyuki Nishi, Hiroshi Takeshima, Rebecca Sitsapesan
KEY POINTS: The role of trimeric intracellular cation (TRIC) channels is not known, although evidence suggests they may regulate ryanodine receptors (RyR) via multiple mechanisms. We therefore investigated whether Tric-a gene knockout (KO) alters the single-channel function of skeletal RyR (RyR1). We find that RyR1 from Tric-a KO mice are more sensitive to inhibition by divalent cations, although they respond normally to cytosolic Ca(2+) , ATP, caffeine and luminal Ca(2+) . In the presence of Mg(2+) , ATP cannot effectively activate RyR1 from Tric-a KO mice...
April 7, 2017: Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28357410/phenotypes-genotypes-and-prevalence-of-congenital-myopathies-older-than-5-years-in-denmark
#12
Nanna Witting, Ulla Werlauff, Morten Duno, John Vissing
OBJECTIVE: Congenital myopathy as a nosologic entity has long been recognized, but knowledge of overall and subtype prevalence and phenotype-genotype relationship is scarce, especially in the adult population. METHODS: A national cohort of 107 patients ≥5 years diagnosed with congenital myopathy were prospectively assessed clinically, histologically, and genetically. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients were excluded because of atypical features or alternative etiologies...
April 2017: Neurology. Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28351836/structural-and-biophysical-analyses-of-the-skeletal-dihydropyridine-receptor-%C3%AE-subunit-%C3%AE-1a-reveal-critical-roles-of-domain-interactions-for-stability
#13
Nicole C Norris, Soumya Joseph, Shouvik Aditya, Yamuna Karunasekara, Philip G Board, Angela F Dulhunty, Aaron J Oakley, Marco G Casarotto
Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in skeletal muscle requires a physical interaction between the voltage-gated calcium channel dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) and the ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release channel. Although the exact molecular mechanism that initiates skeletal EC coupling is unresolved, it is clear that both the α1 and β subunits of DHPR are essential for this process. Here, we employed a series of techniques, including size-exclusion chromatography-multi-angle light scattering, differential scanning fluorimetry, and isothermal calorimetry, to characterize various biophysical properties of the skeletal DHPR β subunit β1a Removal of the intrinsically disordered N and C termini and the hook region of β1a prevented oligomerization, allowing for its structural determination by X-ray crystallography...
May 19, 2017: Journal of Biological Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28337975/a-chemical-chaperone-improves-muscle-function-in-mice-with-a-ryr1-mutation
#14
Chang Seok Lee, Amy D Hanna, Hui Wang, Adan Dagnino-Acosta, Aditya D Joshi, Mark Knoblauch, Yan Xia, Dimitra K Georgiou, Jianjun Xu, Cheng Long, Hisayuki Amano, Corey Reynolds, Keke Dong, John C Martin, William R Lagor, George G Rodney, Ergun Sahin, Caroline Sewry, Susan L Hamilton
Mutations in the RYR1 gene cause severe myopathies. Mice with an I4895T mutation in the type 1 ryanodine receptor/Ca(2+) release channel (RyR1) display muscle weakness and atrophy, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that the I4895T mutation in RyR1 decreases the amplitude of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) transient, resting cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, muscle triadin content and calsequestrin (CSQ) localization to the junctional SR, and increases endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress/unfolded protein response (UPR) and mitochondrial ROS production...
March 24, 2017: Nature Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326467/malignant-hyperthermia-susceptibility-in-patients-with-exertional-rhabdomyolysis-a-retrospective-cohort-study-and-updated-systematic-review
#15
Natalia Kraeva, Alexander Sapa, James J Dowling, Sheila Riazi
INTRODUCTION: Two potentially fatal syndromes, malignant hyperthermia (MH), an adverse reaction to general anesthesia, and exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) share some clinical features, including hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, tachycardia, and elevated serum creatine kinase. Some patients with ER have experienced an MH event and/or have been diagnosed as MH susceptible (MHS). In order to assess the relationship between ER and MH further, we conducted a retrospective cohort study summarizing clinical and genetic information on Canadian patients with ER who were diagnosed as MHS...
March 21, 2017: Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia, Journal Canadien D'anesthésie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303574/functional-impact-of-an-oculopharyngeal-muscular-dystrophy-mutation-in-pabpn1
#16
Maricela García-Castañeda, Ana Victoria Vega, Rocío Rodríguez, Maria Guadalupe Montiel-Jaen, Bulmaro Cisneros, Angel Zarain-Herzberg, Guillermo Avila
Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is linked to mutations in the gene encoding poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD mutations consist in an expansion of a tract that contains 10 alanines (to 12-17). The disease courses with muscle weakness that begins in adulthood, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we investigated functional effects of PABPN1 and an OPMD mutation (PABPN1-17A), using myotubes transfected with cDNAs encoding these proteins (GFP-tagged). PABPN1 stimulated myoblast fusion (100%), but PABPN1-17A failed to mimic this effect...
March 16, 2017: Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28290972/malignant-hyperthermia-susceptibility-and-fitness-for-duty
#17
Michael A Lee, Erin B McGlinch, Maria C McGlinch, John F Capacchione
INTRODUCTION: Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is an inherited hypermetabolic condition characterized by uncontrolled calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle, usually from exposure to inhaled general anesthetics and/or the depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent succinylcholine. Multiple case reports now reveal that crises may be precipitated by environmental factors such as exercise or high ambient temperatures. Common signs of an MH crisis include life-threatening hyperthermia, metabolic acidosis, muscle rigidity, and tachycardia...
March 2017: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28289592/associations-of-biochemical-changes-and-maternal-traits-with-mutation-1843-c-t-in-the-ryr1-gene-as-a-common-cause-for-porcine-stress-syndrome
#18
Z T Popovski, B Tanaskovska, E Miskoska-Milevska, S Andonov, S Domazetovska
Stress syndrome is usually caused by a mutation in the ryanodine receptor gene (ryr1) and it is widely studied in humans and swine populations. The protein product of this gene plays a crucial role in the regulation of calcium transport in muscle cells. A G>T mutation in the human ryr1 gene, which results in the replacement of a conserved arginine at position 614 where a leucine occurs at the same position as the previously identified Arg→Cys mutation reported in all cases of porcine stress syndrome (PSS)...
December 1, 2016: Balkan Journal of Medical Genetics: BJMG
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28269792/ryr1-related-myopathies-clinical-histopathologic-and-genetic-heterogeneity-among-17-patients-from-a-portuguese-tertiary-centre
#19
Raquel Samões, Jorge Oliveira, Ricardo Taipa, Teresa Coelho, Márcio Cardoso, Ana Gonçalves, Rosário Santos, Manuel Melo Pires, Manuela Santos
BACKGROUND: Pathogenic variants in ryanodine receptor type 1 (RYR1) gene are an important cause of congenital myopathy. The clinical, histopathologic and genetic spectrum is wide. OBJECTIVE: Review a group of the patients diagnosed with ryanodinopathy in a tertiary centre from North Portugal, as an attempt to define some phenotypical patterns that may help guiding future diagnosis. METHODS: Patients were identified from the database of the reference centre for Neuromuscular Disorders in North Portugal...
2017: Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28260211/respiratory-muscle-contractile-inactivity-induced-by-mechanical-ventilation-in-piglets-leads-to-leaky-ryanodine-receptors-and-diaphragm-weakness
#20
Stefan Matecki, Boris Jung, Nathalie Saint, Valerie Scheuermann, Samir Jaber, Alain Lacampagne
Respiratory muscle contractile inactivity during mechanical ventilation (MV) induces diaphragm muscle weakness, a condition referred to as ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction (VIDD). Although VIDD pathophysiological mechanisms are still not fully understood, it has been recently suggested that remodeling of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channel/ryanodine receptors (RyR1) in the diaphragm is a proximal mechanism of VIDD. Here, we used piglets, a large animal model of VIDD that is more relevant to human pathophysiology, to determine whether RyR1 alterations are observed in the presence of diaphragm weakness...
March 4, 2017: Journal of Muscle Research and Cell Motility
keyword
keyword
46183
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"