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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087430/ryanodine-receptor-1-polymorphism-is-not-associated-with-aneurysmal-subarachnoid-hemorrhage-or-its-clinical-sequelae
#1
Philipp Hendrix, Paul M Foreman, Mark R Harrigan, Winfield S Fisher, Nilesh A Vyas, Robert H Lipsky, Minkuan Lin, Beverly C Walters, R Shane Tubbs, Mohammadali M Shoja, Jean-Francois Pittet, Mali Mathru, Christoph J Griessenauer
OBJECTIVE: The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) remain poorly understand. Ryanodine receptors (RYR) are intracellular calcium channels involved in the regulation of vascular smooth muscle cells and cerebrovascular tone and diameter. Previous work reported an association between a RYR polymorphism and cerebral vasospasm. Here, we sought to assess the impact of that RYR polymorphism on aSAH and its clinical sequelae...
January 10, 2017: World Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077437/sensitized-signalling-between-l-type-ca2-channels-and-ryanodine-receptors-in-the-absence-or-inhibition-of-fkbp12-6-in-cardiomyocytes
#2
Yan-Ting Zhao, Yun-Bo Guo, Lei Gu, Xue-Xin Fan, Hua-Qian Yang, Zheng Chen, Peng Zhou, Qi Yuan, Guang-Ju Ji, Shi-Qiang Wang
AIMS: The heart contraction is controlled by the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+ )release (CICR) between L-type Ca(2+ )channels and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). The FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6 binds to RyR subunits, but its role in stabilizing RyR function has been debated for long. Recent reports of high-resolution RyR structure show that the HD2 domain that binds to the SPRY2 domain of neighbouring subunit in FKBP-bound RyR1 is detached and invisible in FKBP-null RyR2. The present study was to test the consequence of FKBP12...
January 10, 2017: Cardiovascular Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063098/muscular-body-build-and-male-sex-are-independently-associated-with-malignant-hyperthermia-susceptibility
#3
Brian Butala, Barbara Brandom
PURPOSE: Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a disorder of the regulation of calcium in skeletal muscle. Muscular individuals have been shown to have a 13.6-fold increased risk of death during malignant hyperthermia (MH) episodes and are more likely to experience a recurrence after initial treatment. Twenty-five percent of severe MH episodes have occurred in elite athletes. This study investigated the association between MHS and muscular body build. METHODS: Data were obtained from existing reports in the North American Malignant Hyperthermia Registry, including the Report of Muscle Biopsy and Contracture Testing (caffeine-halothane contracture test [CHCT]) as well as Adverse Metabolic or Muscular Reaction to Anesthesia (AMRA) reports...
January 6, 2017: Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia, Journal Canadien D'anesthésie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28044347/decreased-intracellular-ca-2-coincides-with-reduced-expression-of-dhpr%C3%AE-1s-ryr1-and-diaphragmatic-dysfunction-in-a-rat-model-of-sepsis
#4
Meng-Meng Wang, Li-Ying Hao, Feng Guo, Bin Zhong, Xiao-Mei Zhong, Jing Yuan, Yi-Fei Hao, Shuang Zhao, Xue-Fei Sun, Ming Lei, Guang-Yu Jiao
INTRODUCTION: Sepsis can cause decreased diaphragmatic contractility. Intracellular calcium as a second messenger is central to diaphragmatic contractility. However, changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+) ]) and the distribution and co-localization of relevant calcium channels (dihydropyridine receptors, DHPRα1s; ryanodine receptors, RyR1) remain unclear during sepsis. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the effect of changed intracellular [Ca(2+) ] and expression and distribution of DHPRα1s and RyR1 on diaphragm function during sepsis...
January 3, 2017: Muscle & Nerve
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012042/dihydropyridine-receptor-dhpr-cacna1s-congenital-myopathy
#5
Vanessa Schartner, Norma B Romero, Sandra Donkervoort, Susan Treves, Pinki Munot, Tyler Mark Pierson, Ivana Dabaj, Edoardo Malfatti, Irina T Zaharieva, Francesco Zorzato, Osorio Abath Neto, Guy Brochier, Xavière Lornage, Bruno Eymard, Ana Lía Taratuto, Johann Böhm, Hernan Gonorazky, Leigh Ramos-Platt, Lucy Feng, Rahul Phadke, Diana X Bharucha-Goebel, Charlotte Jane Sumner, Mai Thao Bui, Emmanuelle Lacene, Maud Beuvin, Clémence Labasse, Nicolas Dondaine, Raphael Schneider, Julie Thompson, Anne Boland, Jean-François Deleuze, Emma Matthews, Aleksandra Nadaj Pakleza, Caroline A Sewry, Valérie Biancalana, Susana Quijano-Roy, Francesco Muntoni, Michel Fardeau, Carsten G Bönnemann, Jocelyn Laporte
Muscle contraction upon nerve stimulation relies on excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) to promote the rapid and generalized release of calcium within myofibers. In skeletal muscle, ECC is performed by the direct coupling of a voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channel (dihydropyridine receptor; DHPR) located on the T-tubule with a Ca(2+) release channel (ryanodine receptor; RYR1) on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) component of the triad. Here, we characterize a novel class of congenital myopathy at the morphological, molecular, and functional levels...
December 23, 2016: Acta Neuropathologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28011884/pharmacogenetics-and-pathophysiology-of-cacna1s-mutations-in-malignant-hyperthermia
#6
Teresa Ann Beam, Emily F Loudermilk, David F Kisor
A review of the pharmacogenetics (PGt) and pathophysiology of calcium voltage-gated channel subunit alpha1 S (CACNA1S) mutations in malignant hyperthermia susceptibility type 5 (MHS5; MIM #60188) is presented. Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a life-threatening hypermetabolic state of skeletal muscle usually induced by volatile, halogenated anesthetics and/or the depolarizing neuromuscular blocker succinylcholine. In addition to ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) mutations, several CACNA1S mutations are known to be risk factors for increased susceptibility to MH (MHS)...
December 23, 2016: Physiological Genomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28007904/cellular-biochemical-and-molecular-changes-in-muscles-from-patients-with-x-linked-myotubular-myopathy-due-to-mtm1-mutations
#7
Christoph Bachmann, Heinz Jungbluth, Francesco Muntoni, Adnan Y Manzur, Francesco Zorzato, Susan Treves
Centronuclear myopathies are early-onset muscle diseases caused by mutations in several genes including MTM1, DNM2, BIN1, RYR1 and TTN The most severe and often fatal X-linked form of myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the ubiquitous lipid phosphatase myotubularin, an enzyme specifically dephosphorylating phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate. Because XLMTM patients have a predominantly muscle-specific phenotype a number of pathogenic mechanisms have been proposed, including a direct effect of the accumulated lipid on the skeletal muscle calcium channel ryanodine receptor 1, a negative effect on the structure of intracellular organelles and defective autophagy...
December 22, 2016: Human Molecular Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28003463/congenital-myopathy-results-from-misregulation-of-a-muscle-ca2-channel-by-mutant-stac3
#8
Jeremy W Linsley, I-Uen Hsu, Linda Groom, Viktor Yarotskyy, Manuela Lavorato, Eric J Horstick, Drew Linsley, Wenjia Wang, Clara Franzini-Armstrong, Robert T Dirksen, John Y Kuwada
Skeletal muscle contractions are initiated by an increase in Ca(2+) released during excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, and defects in EC coupling are associated with human myopathies. EC coupling requires communication between voltage-sensing dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) in transverse tubule membrane and Ca(2+) release channel ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Stac3 protein (SH3 and cysteine-rich domain 3) is an essential component of the EC coupling apparatus and a mutation in human STAC3 causes the debilitating Native American myopathy (NAM), but the nature of how Stac3 acts on the DHPR and/or RyR1 is unknown...
December 21, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27998200/spinal-cord-injury-leads-to-hyperoxidation-and-nitrosylation-of-skeletal-muscle-ryanodine-receptor-1-associated-with-upregulation-of-nadh-oxidase-4
#9
Xin-Hua Liu, Lauren Harlow, Zachary A Graham, William A Bauman, Chris Cardozo
Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in marked atrophy and dysfunction of skeletal muscle. There are currently no effective treatments for SCI-induced muscle atrophy or the dysfunction of the remaining muscle tissue. NADPH oxidase-4 (Nox4) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and has been identified as an important O2 sensor in skeletal muscle. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are calcium (Ca2+) channels that are responsible for Ca2+ release from SR. In skeletal muscle, type1 RyR (RyR1) is predominantly functional...
December 21, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27926840/calcium-dependent-structural-dynamics-of-a-spin-labeled-ryr-peptide-bound-to-calmodulin
#10
Cheng Her, Jesse E McCaffrey, David D Thomas, Christine B Karim
We have used chemical synthesis, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and circular dichroism to detect and analyze the structural dynamics of a ryanodine receptor (RyR) peptide bound to calmodulin (CaM). The skeletal muscle calcium release channel RyR1 is activated by Ca(2+)-free CaM and inhibited by Ca(2+)-bound CaM. To probe the structural mechanism for this regulation, wild-type RyRp and four spin-labeled derivatives were synthesized, each containing the nitroxide probe 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid substituted for a single amino acid...
December 6, 2016: Biophysical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27918309/intraoperative-presentation-of-malignant-hyperthermia-confirmed-by-ryr1-gene-mutation-c-7522c-t-p-r2508c-leads-to-diagnosis-of-king-denborough-syndrome-in-a-child-with-hypotonia-and-dysmorphic-features
#11
Mark R Joseph, Mary C Theroux, James J Mooney, Shawn Falitz, Barbara W Brandom, Debra L Byler
We present the novel case report of a child with hypotonia and dysmorphic features who developed malignant hyperthermia (MH) intraoperatively. Neurology workup revealed the presence of a known causative ryanodine receptor (RYR1) mutation for MH, c.7522C>T; p.R2508C. Furthermore, the neurology workup diagnosed the child with King-Denborough syndrome (KDS). This particular mutation has never been documented in a patient with KDS. Atypical presentation of MH is more likely in patients with RYR1-related myopathy...
December 1, 2016: A & A Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27906053/attenuated-ca-2-release-in-a-mouse-model-of-limb-girdle-muscular-dystrophy-2a
#12
Marino DiFranco, Irina Kramerova, Julio L Vergara, Melissa Jan Spencer
BACKGROUND: Mutations in CAPN3 cause limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A), a progressive muscle wasting disease. CAPN3 is a non-lysosomal, Ca-dependent, muscle-specific proteinase. Ablation of CAPN3 (calpain-3 knockout (C3KO) mice) leads to reduced ryanodine receptor (RyR1) expression and abnormal Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Ca-CaMKII)-mediated signaling. We previously reported that Ca(2+) release measured by fura2-FF imaging in response to single action potential stimulation was reduced in old C3KO mice; however, the use of field stimulation prevented investigation of the mechanisms underlying this impairment...
February 24, 2016: Skeletal Muscle
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27866274/ryanodine-receptor-type-3-does-not-contribute-to-contractions-in-the-mouse-myometrium-regardless-of-pregnancy
#13
Katsuhito Matsuki, Masashi Takemoto, Yoshiaki Suzuki, Hisao Yamamura, Susumu Ohya, Hiroshi Takeshima, Yuji Imaizumi
Ryanodine receptor type 3 (RyR3) is expressed in myometrial smooth muscle cells (MSMCs). The short isoform of RyR3 is a dominant negative variant (DN-RyR3) and negatively regulates the functions of RyR2 and full-length (FL)-RyR3. DN-RyR3 has been suggested to function as a major RyR3 isoform in non-pregnant (NP) mouse MSMCs, and FL-RyR3 may also be upregulated during pregnancy (P). This increase in the FL-RyR3/DN-RyR3 ratio may contribute to the strong contractions by MSMCs for parturition. In the present study, spontaneous contractions by the myometrium in NP and P mice were highly susceptible to nifedipine but were not affected by ryanodine...
November 20, 2016: Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857962/functional-analysis-of-ryr1-variants-linked-to-malignant-hyperthermia
#14
Jeremy Stephens, Anja H Schiemann, Cornelia Roesl, Dorota Miller, Sean Massey, Neil Pollock, Terasa Bulger, Kathryn Stowell
Malignant hyperthermia manifests as a rapid and sustained rise in temperature in response to pharmacological triggering agents, e.g. inhalational anesthetics and the muscle relaxant suxamethonium. Other clinical signs include an increase in end-tidal CO2, increased O2 consumption, as well as tachycardia, and if untreated a malignant hyperthermia episode can result in death. The metabolic changes are caused by dysregulation of skeletal muscle Ca(2+) homeostasis, resulting from a defective ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) channel, which resides in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and controls the flux of Ca(2+) ions from intracellular stores to the cytoplasm...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27855725/review-of-ryr1-pathway-and-associated-pathomechanisms
#15
REVIEW
Jessica W Witherspoon, Katherine G Meilleur
Ryanodine receptor isoform-1 (RyR1) is a major calcium channel in skeletal muscle important for excitation-contraction coupling. Mutations in the RYR1 gene yield RyR1 protein dysfunction that manifests clinically as RYR1-related congenital myopathies (RYR1-RM) and/or malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS). Individuals with RYR1-RM and/or MHS exhibit varying symptoms and severity. The symptoms impair quality of life and put patients at risk for early mortality, yet the cause of varying severity is not well understood...
November 17, 2016: Acta Neuropathologica Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27854207/long-term-oral-dantrolene-improved-muscular-symptoms-in-a-malignant-hyperthermia-susceptible-individual
#16
Brian N Butala, Audry Kang, Jasmeen Guron, Barbara W Brandom
This case report describes a female with p.Lys4876Arg amino acid change in the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RYR1) and a sibling who died of malignant hyperthermia (MH) during anesthesia. After her diagnosis as MH susceptible, this patient was administered low-dose dantrolene daily for greater than 25 years for treatment of chronic muscle spasm and pain in her lower extremities and back limiting sleep. Her creatine phosphokinase (CPK) was as high as 2390 IU/L during labor and 900 IU at rest. With 25 mg dantrolene daily, muscle cramps were eliminated, and sleep was improved...
March 3, 2016: Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27854153/genetic-factors-affecting-pork-quality-halothane-and-rendement-napole-genes
#17
Ramon Cesar D Salas, Claro N Mingala
The most common pork quality problems are pale, soft, and exudative (PSE) and acid pork (AP). PSE is associated with the expression of recessive halothane (Hal) allele Hal(n). Recessive Hal pigs (Hal(nn)) have defective Ca(2+) release channels (CRC) or Ryanodine Receptors (RYR1) within the sarcoplasmic reticulum that allow uncontrolled release of Ca(2+) in response to stress. Abnormal lactic acid metabolism caused by stress prior to slaughter leads to the sudden drop in postmortem muscle pH producing the PSE pork...
November 17, 2016: Animal Biotechnology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27851958/alternative-splicing-of-four-trafficking-genes-regulates-myofiber-structure-and-skeletal-muscle-physiology
#18
Jimena Giudice, James A Loehr, George G Rodney, Thomas A Cooper
During development, transcriptional and post-transcriptional networks are coordinately regulated to drive organ maturation. Alternative splicing contributes by producing temporal-specific protein isoforms. We previously found that genes undergoing splicing transitions during mouse postnatal heart development are enriched for vesicular trafficking and membrane dynamics functions. Here, we show that adult trafficking isoforms are also expressed in adult skeletal muscle and hypothesize that striated muscle utilizes alternative splicing to generate specific isoforms required for function of adult tissue...
November 15, 2016: Cell Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27832566/sequencing-of-genes-involved-in-the-movement-of-calcium-across-human-skeletal-muscle-sarcoplasmic-reticulum-continuing-the-search-for-genes-associated-with-malignant-hyperthermia
#19
A R Bjorksten, R L Gillies, B M Hockey, D Du Sart
The genetic basis of malignant hyperthermia (MH) is not fully characterised and likely involves more than just the currently classified mutations in the gene encoding the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (<i>RYR1</i>) and the gene encoding the α1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor (<i>CACNA1S</i>). In this paper we sequence other genes involved in calcium trafficking within skeletal muscle in patients with positive in vitro contracture tests, searching for alternative genes associated with MH...
November 2016: Anaesthesia and Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27812757/counter-flow-suggests-transport-of-dantrolene-and-5-oh-dantrolene-by-the-organic-anion-transporters-2-oat2-and-3-oat3
#20
Birgitta C Burckhardt, Maja Henjakovic, Yohannes Hagos, Gerhard Burckhardt
Dantrolene is the only available drug for the treatment of malignant hyperthermia, a life-threatening inborn sensitivity of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) in skeletal muscles to volatile anesthetics. Dantrolene is metabolized in the liver to 5-OH dantrolene. Both compounds are zwitterions or net negatively charged. Here, we investigated interactions of dantrolene and 5-OH dantrolene with solute carrier (SLC) family members occurring in skeletal muscle cells, hepatocytes, and renal proximal tubule cells. SLC22A8 (organic anion transporter 3, OAT3) was very sensitive to both compounds exhibiting IC50 values of 0...
November 2016: Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology
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