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Nina S Nnamani, Judson C Janak, Steven J Hudak, Jessica C Rivera, Eluned A Lewis, Douglas W Soderdahl, Jean A Orman
BACKGROUND: In Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF), genitourinary (GU) wounds have occurred in unprecedented numbers. Severe concomitant injuries, including extremity amputations, are common. The epidemiology of GU injury and extremity amputation in OEF/OIF has not been described. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Department of Defense Trauma Registry was queried from October 2001 through August 2013 to identify all surviving US male service members with GU injuries sustained in OEF/OIF...
November 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Nicholas M Studer, Ahmad H Yassin, Donald E Keen
INTRODUCTION: The current Tactical Combat Casualty Care Guidelines recommend tranexamic acid (TXA) administration for casualties in whom massive blood transfusion is anticipated. However, despite Hextend being the recommended resuscitation fluid, the guidelines recommend against using TXA with Hextend. This appears to be due to a concern about pharmaceutical compatibility, despite the absence of a direct study of compatibility in the literature. METHODS: Two solutions of Hextend and TXA were examined for compatibility...
October 2016: Military Medicine
Jason S Radowsky, Carlos J Rodriguez, Gary G Wind, Eric A Elster
The application of lessons learned on the battlefield for timely surgical control of lower extremity hemorrhage secondary to blast injuries to the civilian practice for similar wounding patterns from industrial accidents or terrorist activities is imperative. Although simple cut-down procedures are commonly sufficient for the control of blood vessels for distal extremity traumatic amputations, high-thigh or disarticulation wounding patterns often require more complex surgical methods. The following details both the decision-making process and operative techniques for controlling hemorrhage from lower extremity blast injuries...
October 2016: Military Medicine
Juan Cheng, Shibin Feng, Songling Han, Xiangjun Zhang, Yidan Chen, Xing Zhou, Ruibing Wang, Xiaohui Li, Houyuan Hu, Jianxiang Zhang
Currently, there is still unmet demand for effective and safe hemostats to control abnormal bleeding in different conditions. With the aim to develop affordable, safe, effective, easily stored, and low cost hemostats, we developed a series of positively charged nanoparticles by a facile one-pot assembly approach. In this strategy, nanoparticles were formed by cholic acid-mediated self-assembly of polyethyleneimine (PEI). Regardless of different structures of cholic acids and PEIs, well-defined nanoparticles could be successfully formed...
October 13, 2016: ACS Nano
Myles R McKenzie, Ernest W Parrish, Ethan A Miles, James C Spradling, Lanny F Littlejohn, Mark D Quinlan, George A Barbee, David R King
During an assault on an extremely remote target, a US Special Operations Soldier sustained multiple gunshot and fragmentation wounds to the thorax, resulting in a traumatic arrest and subsequent survival. His care, including care under fire, tactical field care, tactical evacuation care, and Role III, IV, and V care, is presented. The case is used to illustrate the complex dynamics of Special Operations care on the modern battlefield and the exceptional outcomes possible when evidence-based medicine is taken to the warfighter with effective, farforward, expeditionary medical-force projection...
2016: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
Jean-Guillaume Meusnier, Charles Dewar, Erti Mavrovi, Frederic Caremil, Pierre-Francois Wey, Jean-Yves Martinez
BACKGROUND: Junctional hemorrhage (i.e., between the trunk and limbs) are too proximal for a tourniquet and difficult to compress. These hemorrhages are responsible for 20% of preventable deaths by bleeding on the battlefield. The majority of these involve the groin area. Devices allowing a proximal compression for arterial axes have been recently developed. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the use of two junctional- tourniquet models, the Combat Ready Clamp (CRoC®) and the SAM® Junctional Tourniquet (SJT), in simulated out-of-hospital trauma care when tourniquets were ineffective to stop the arterial flow...
2016: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
Sharon Edwards, Jason Smith
Trauma is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, in civilian environments and on the battlefield. Trauma-induced haemorrhage is the principal cause of potentially preventable death, which is generally attributable to a combination of vascular injury and coagulopathy. Survival rates following severe traumatic injury have increased due to advanced trauma management initiatives and treatment protocols, influenced by lessons learned from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The use of tourniquets and intraosseous needles, early blood and blood product transfusion, administration of tranexamic acid in pre-hospital settings, and consultant-led damage control resuscitation incorporating damage control surgery have all played their part...
October 6, 2016: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
Huaiyuan Wang, Xu Ding, Cheng Huang, Xiaobei Wu
Recently, there is a growing interest in the applications of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). A set of sensor nodes is deployed in order to collectively survey an area of interest and/or perform specific surveillance tasks in some of the applications, such as battlefield reconnaissance. Due to the harsh deployment environments and limited energy supply, nodes may fail, which impacts the connectivity of the whole network. Since a single node failure (cut-vertex) will destroy the connectivity and divide the network into disjoint blocks, most of the existing studies focus on the problem of single node failure...
2016: Sensors
Lionel F Poulin, Mathias Chamaillard
The recent adoption of a unified nomenclature for the mononuclear phagocyte system has already led to the generation of novel strategies for specifically depleting a single subset of phagocytes in the presence of intact lymphoid structures. Herein, we provide a detailed description of how the various types of tissue phagocyte orchestrate the host's defense against enteric bacterial infections. From a bench-to-bedside perspective, we expect that this paradigm will accelerate the development of novel adjuvants and vaccines in human and veterinary microbiology...
September 20, 2016: Veterinary Microbiology
Michael J Beltran, Tyson E Becker, Richard K Hurley, Jennifer M Gurney, Roman A Hayda
Hemorrhage continues to be the most common cause of death among service members wounded in combat. Injuries that were previously nonsurvivable in previous wars are now routinely seen by combat surgeons in forward surgical units, the result of improvements in body armor, the universal use of field tourniquets to control extremity hemorrhage at the point of injury, and rapid air evacuation strategies. Combat orthopaedic surgeons remain a vital aspect of the forward surgical unit, tasked with assisting general surgical colleagues in the resuscitation of patients in hemorrhagic shock while also addressing traumatic amputations, open and closed long bone fractures, and mechanically unstable pelvic trauma...
October 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma
Jayne R Stevens, Joseph Brennan
High velocity skull base injuries on the battlefield are unique in comparison to most civilian sector trauma. With more than 43,000 United States military personnel injuries during Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF), the most recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have significantly expanded the understanding of the physiology of modern battlefield trauma and how to appropriately address these injuries. The acute care principles of effective triage, airway management, and hemorrhage control in these injuries can be life saving and are reviewed here...
October 2016: Journal of Neurological Surgery. Part B, Skull Base
Nasya M Sturdivant, Sean G Smith, Syed F Ali, Jeffrey C Wolchok, Kartik Balachandran
Non-penetrating or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is commonly experienced in accidents, the battlefield and in full-contact sports. Astrocyte cellular edema is one of the major factors that leads to high morbidity post-mTBI. Various studies have reported an upregulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, following brain injury. AZA is an antiepileptic drug that has been shown to inhibit AQP4 expression and in this study we investigate the drug as a therapeutic to mitigate the extent of mTBI induced cellular edema...
2016: Scientific Reports
Bronwen J A Jugg, Heidi Hoard-Fruchey, Cristin Rothwell, James F Dillman, Jonathan David, John Jenner, Alfred M Sciuto
Sulfur mustard (HD) is a vesicating and alkylating agent widely used on the battlefield during World War I and more recently in the Iran-Iraq War. It targets the eyes, skin, and lungs, producing skin burns, conjunctivitis, and compromised respiratory function; early acute effects lead to long-term consequences. However, it is the effects on the lungs that drive morbidity and eventual mortality. The temporal postexposure response to HD within lung tissue raises the question of whether toxicity is driven by the alkylating properties of HD on critical homeostatic pathways...
October 17, 2016: Chemical Research in Toxicology
Vincent J Mase, Janet L Roe, Robert J Christy, Michael A Dubick, Thomas J Walters
BACKGROUND: The widespread application of tourniquets has reduced battlefield mortality related to extremity exsanguinations. Tourniquet-induced ischemia-reperfusion injury (I/R) can contribute to muscle loss. Postischemic conditioning (PostC) confers protection against I/R in cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle flaps. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of PostC on extremity muscle viability in an established rat hindlimb tourniquet model. METHODS: Rats were randomly assigned to PostC-1, PostC-2, or no conditioning ischemic groups (n = 10 per group)...
April 16, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Gwyneth R Milbrath
OBJECTIVE: Much has been written about the military events of December 7, 1941; however, little has been documented about the nurses' work and experience at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The aerial assault on Pearl Harbor was the first time in US history that Army nurses had been on the front line of battle. Nurses quickly triaged and stabilized those who could be saved, and provided compassion and comfort to those who were dying, in an environment where the nurses were unsure of their own survival...
October 2016: U.S. Army Medical Department Journal
Minyu Wang, Rita A Busuttil, Sharon Pattison, Paul J Neeson, Alex Boussioutas
Like the wars predating the First World War where human foot soldiers were deemed tools in the battlefield against an enemy, so too are the host immune cells of a patient battling a malignant gastric cancer. Indeed, the tumour microenvironment resembles a battlefield, where the patient's immune cells are the defence against invading tumour cells. However, the relationship between different immune components of the host response to cancer is more complex than an "us against them" model. Components of the immune system inadvertently work against the interests of the host and become pro-tumourigenic while other components soldier on against the common enemy - the tumour cell...
July 28, 2016: World Journal of Gastroenterology: WJG
Ben Antebi, Avi Benov, Elizabeth A Mann-Salinas, Tuan D Le, Leopoldo C Cancio, Joseph C Wenke, Haim Paran, Avraham Yitzhak, Bader Tarif, Kirby R Gross, David Dagan, Elon Glassberg
BACKGROUND: As new conflicts emerge and enemies evolve, military medical organizations worldwide must adopt the "lessons learned." In this study, we describe roles of care (ROCs) deployed and injuries sustained by both US and Israeli militaries during recent conflicts. The purpose of this collaborative work is facilitate exchange of medical data among allied forces in order to advance military medicine and facilitate strategic readiness for future military engagements that may involve less predictable situations of evacuation and care, such as prolonged field care...
November 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Patricia Hinton Walker, Arnyce Pock, Catherine G Ling, Kyung Nancy Kwon, Megan Vaughan
Battlefield acupuncture is a unique auricular acupuncture procedure which is being used in a number of military medical facilities throughout the Department of Defense (DoD). It has been used with anecdotal published positive impact with warriors experiencing polytrauma, post-traumatic stress disorder, and traumatic brain injury. It has also been effectively used to treat warriors with muscle and back pain from carrying heavy combat equipment in austere environments. This article highlights the history within the DoD related to the need for nonpharmacologic/opioid pain management across the continuum of care from combat situations, during evacuation, and throughout recovery and rehabilitation...
September 2016: Nursing Outlook
Neal Baumgartner, Ryan W Logan, Matthew F Gruse, Erin M Flerlage, Kimberly N Hale, Katherine A Batterton
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Christian Jung, Friedrich Jung, Malte Kelm
In the past years the microcirculation has gained increasing attention not only by basic scientists, but also by clinicians and translational researchers. In the clinical scenario, it has been convincingly described that the microcirculation is a key predictor of outcome and of central pathophysiological relevance. A vast body of evidence demonstrates the central role of the smallest vessels in inflammation, hyperviscosity, cell-cell-interaction, endothelial function, tissue edema, hemodynamic and blood flow regulation and its important role in the interaction with soluble factors...
September 12, 2016: Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation
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