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brain stem

Shauna Katz, Delphine Cussigh, Noelia Urbán, Isabelle Blomfield, François Guillemot, Laure Bally-Cuif, Marion Coolen
Throughout life, adult neural stem cells (NSCs) produce new neurons and glia that contribute to crucial brain functions. Quiescence is an essential protective feature of adult NSCs; however, the establishment and maintenance of this state remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that in the adult zebrafish pallium, the brain-enriched miR-9 is expressed exclusively in a subset of quiescent NSCs, highlighting a heterogeneity within these cells, and is necessary to maintain NSC quiescence. Strikingly, miR-9, along with Argonaute proteins (Agos), is localized to the nucleus of quiescent NSCs, and manipulating their nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio impacts quiescence...
October 25, 2016: Cell Reports
Giorgia Quadrato, Juliana Brown, Paola Arlotta
Neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD) are of great societal and medical importance, but the complexity of these diseases and the challenges of modeling the development and function of the human brain have made these disorders difficult to study experimentally. The recent development of 3D brain organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells offers a promising approach for investigating the phenotypic underpinnings of these highly polygenic disorders and for understanding the contribution of individual risk variants and complex genetic background to human pathology...
October 26, 2016: Nature Medicine
Mohammad A Kaisar, Ravi K Sajja, Shikha Prasad, Vinay V Abhyankar, Taylor Liles, Luca Cucullo
The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic biological interface which actively controls the passage of substances between the blood and the central nervous system (CNS). From a biological and functional standpoint, the BBB plays a crucial role in maintaining brain homeostasis inasmuch that deterioration of BBB functions are prodromal to many CNS disorders. Conversely, the BBB hinders the delivery of drugs targeting the brain to treat a variety of neurological diseases. Area covered: This article reviews recent technological improvements and innovation in the field of BBB modeling including static and dynamic cell-based platforms, microfluidic systems and the use of stem cells and 3D printing technologies...
October 26, 2016: Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery
Beomsue Kim, Suihan Feng, Seong-Wook Yun, Cheryl Leong, Rudrakanta Satapathy, Si Yan Diana Wan, Young-Tae Chang
Selection of a specific neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has attracted broad attention in regenerative medicine for neurological disorders. Here, we report a fluorescent probe, CDg13, and its application for isolating strong neurogenic NSPCs. In comparison to the NSPCs isolated by other biomarkers, CDg13-stained NSPCs showed higher capability to differentiate into neurons. Target identification revealed that the fluorescence intensity of the probe within cells is inversely proportional to the expression levels of mouse and human Abcg2 transporters...
October 26, 2016: Chembiochem: a European Journal of Chemical Biology
Xiaoxia Hou, Yudong Zhang, Hong Chen
BACKGROUND: Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) results from NOTCH3 gene mutations, which lead to the degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The clinical presentation of CADASIL patients is dependent on the impact of other vascular risk factors and the type of NOTCH3 mutation present. METHODS: Here, we report a rare pathogenic mutation on exon 14 of the NOTCH3 gene in a Chinese family affected by CADASIL with phenotypic peculiarities...
October 24, 2016: CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets
Ghady Haidar, Christa S Zerbe, Michelle Cheng, Adrian M Zelazny, Steven M Holland, Kathleen R Sheridan
Aspergillus spp. are a leading cause of mortality in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), but other fungi have emerged in the era of mould prophylaxis. Of these, Phellinus spp. are an under-recognised cause of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in CGD, and data on their presentation and management are scarce. We present a patient with CGD who developed disseminated IFI involving the lungs and brain. Surgical specimens grew a basidiomycete which was disregarded as a contaminant. After three months of progressive disease despite antifungals, he was diagnosed with Phellinus tropicalis by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing...
October 26, 2016: Mycoses
Cindy T van Velthoven, Mark Dzietko, Michael F Wendland, Nikita Derugin, Joel Faustino, Cobi J Heijnen, Donna M Ferriero, Zinaida S Vexler
Cell therapy has emerged as a potential treatment for many neurodegenerative diseases including stroke and neonatal ischemic brain injury. Delayed intranasal administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after experimental hypoxia-ischemia and after a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in neonatal rats has shown improvement in long-term functional outcomes, but the effects of MSCs on white matter injury (WMI) are insufficiently understood. In this study we used longitudinal T2-weighted (T2W) and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize chronic injury after tMCAO induced in postnatal day 10 (P10) rats and examined the effects of delayed MSC administration on WMI, axonal coverage, and long-term somatosensory function...
October 26, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Research
Isabell Prager, Ina Patties, Katrin Himmelbach, Eva Kendzia, Felicitas Merz, Klaus Müller, Rolf-Dieter Kortmann, Annegret Glasow
INTRODUCTION: Radiation therapy plays an essential role in the treatment of brain tumors, but neurocognitive deficits remain a significant risk, especially in pediatric patients. In recent trials, hippocampal sparing techniques are applied to reduce these adverse effects. Here, we investigate dose-dependent effects of ionizing radiation (IR) on juvenile hippocampal neurogenesis. Additionally, we evaluate the radioprotective potential of resveratrol, a plant polyphenol recognized for its bifunctional tumor-preventive and anticancer effects...
October 2016: Brain and Behavior
Yogi Chang-Yo Hsuan, Cheng-Hsien Lin, Ching-Ping Chang, Mao-Tsun Lin
BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has been reported to improve neurological function following neural injury. Many physiological and molecular mechanisms involving MSC therapy-related neuroprotection have been identified. METHODS: A review is presented of articles that pertain to MSC therapy and diverse brain injuries including stroke, neural trauma, and heat stroke, which were identified using an electronic search (e.g., PubMed), emphasize mechanisms of MSC therapy-related neuroprotection...
October 2016: Brain and Behavior
Sebastian Jessberger
Acute or chronic injury of the adult mammalian brain is often associated with persistent functional deficits as its potential for regeneration and capacity to rebuild lost neural structures is limited. However, the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) persist throughout life in discrete regions of the brain, novel approaches to induce the formation of neuronal and glial cells, and recently developed strategies to generate tissue for exogenous cell replacement strategies opened novel perspectives how to regenerate the adult brain...
September 2016: Transfusion Medicine and Hemotherapy
Jiho Jang, Sangjun Park, Hye Jin Hur, Hyun-Ju Cho, Inhwa Hwang, Yun Pyo Kang, Isak Im, Hyunji Lee, Eunju Lee, Wonsuk Yang, Hoon-Chul Kang, Sung Won Kwon, Je-Wook Yu, Dong-Wook Kim
X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), caused by an ABCD1 mutation, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). Cerebral inflammatory demyelination is the major feature of childhood cerebral ALD (CCALD), the most severe form of ALD, but its underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we identify the aberrant production of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) and 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) in the cellular context of CCALD based on the analysis of ALD patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and ex vivo fibroblasts...
October 25, 2016: Nature Communications
Paula Honório de Melo Martimiano, André de Sa Braga Oliveira, Véronique Ferchaud-Roucher, Mikaël Croyal, Audrey Aguesse, Isabelle Grit, Khadija Ouguerram, Sandra Lopes de Souza, Bertrand Kaeffer, Francisco Bolaños-Jiménez
Early malnutrition is a risk factor for depression and schizophrenia. Since the offspring of malnourished dams exhibit increased brain levels of serotonin (5-HT), a tryptophan-derived neurotransmitter involved in the pathophysiology of these mental disorders, it is believed that the deleterious effects of early malnutrition on brain function are due in large part to altered serotoninergic neurotransmission resulting from impaired tryptophan (Trp) metabolism. However, tryptophan is also metabolized through the kynurenine (KYN) pathway yielding several neuroactive compounds including kynurenic (KA), Qinolinic (QA) and Xanthurenic (XA) acids...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Neurochemistry
David R Raleigh, Bryan Tomlin, Benedict Del Buono, Erika Roddy, Katherine Sear, Lennox Byer, Erin Felton, Anu Banerjee, Joseph Torkildson, David Samuel, Biljana Horn, Steve E Braunstein, Daphne A Haas-Kogan, Sabine Mueller
Pediatric embryonal brain tumor patients treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) are at risk for adverse effects, with greater severity in younger patients. Here we compare outcomes of CSI vs. high-dose chemotherapy (HD), stem cell transplant (SCT) and delayed CSI in newly diagnosed patients. Two hundred one consecutive patients treated for medulloblastoma (72 %), supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (sPNET; 18 %) or pineoblastoma (10 %) at two institutions between 1988 and 2014 were retrospectively identified...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Neuro-oncology
Koji Shimozaki
Adult neurogenesis originates from neural stem cells (NSCs) in specific regions of the adult brain. The molecular mechanisms that control the self-renewal and multipotency of NSCs have not been fully elucidated. In recent years, emerging evidence has revealed that ten-eleven translocation (TET) family DNA dioxygenases TET1 and TET2 play important roles in the central nervous system. Here, I present evidence that Tet1 and Tet2 are expressed in cultured NSCs derived from adult mouse brain and play an important role in the proliferative self-renewal of NSCs in an undifferentiated state...
October 24, 2016: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology
Qian Jiao, Xi-Xun DU, Jun-Xia Xie, Hong Jiang
Neural stem cells (NSCs) offer great promise for the treatment of multiple neurodegenerative diseases. However, the survival and differentiation rates of grafted cells in the host brain need to be enhanced. In this regard, understanding of the underlying mechanism of NSCs survival and death is of great importance for the implications of stem cell-based therapeutic application in the treatments of neurological disorders. Autophagy is a conserved proteolytic mechanism required for maintaining cellular homeostasis, which can affect NSCs fate through regulating their biological behaviors, such as survival and proliferation...
October 25, 2016: Sheng Li Xue Bao: [Acta Physiologica Sinica]
Vellingiri Balachandar, Venkatesan Dhivya, Mohan Gomathi, Subramaniam Mohanadevi, Balasubramanian Venkatesh, Bharathi Geetha
Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are pluripotent stem cells generated from somatic cells by the introduction of a combination of pluripotency-associated genes such as OCT4, SOX2, along with either KLF4 and c-MYC or NANOG and LIN28 via retroviral or lentiviral vectors. Most importantly, hiPSCs are similar to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) functionally as they are pluripotent and can potentially differentiate into any desired cell type when provided with the appropriate cues, but do not have the ethical issues surrounding hESCs...
2016: Stem Cell Investigation
W Li, L Huang, J Zeng, W Lin, K Li, J Sun, W Huang, J Chen, G Wang, Q Ke, J Duan, X Lai, R Chen, M Liu, Y Liu, T Wang, X Yang, Y Chen, H Xia, A P Xiang
The enteric nervous system (ENS) is recognized as a second brain because of its complexity and its largely autonomic control of bowel function. Recent progress in studying the interactions between the ENS and the central nervous system (CNS) has implicated alterations of the gut/brain axis as a possible mechanism in the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), Parkinson's disease (PD) and other human CNS disorders, whereas the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown because of the lack of good model systems...
October 25, 2016: Molecular Psychiatry
Gabriel P Joseph, Ryan McDermott, Maria A Baryshnikova, Charles S Cobbs, Ilya V Ulasov
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive neoplastic brain tumor in humans with a median survival of less than 2 years. It is therefore critical to understand the mechanism of glioma progression and to identify future targets for intervention. We investigate the mechanisms of cytomegalovirus as an oncomodulatory agent implicated in glioma progression, as well as immunosuppression. This review provides a comprehensive evaluation of recent investigative developments concerning the role of CMV in cellular processes during glioma growth...
October 21, 2016: Cancer Letters
Larisa Ryskalin, Fiona Limanaqi, Francesca Biagioni, Alessandro Frati, Vincenzo Esposito, Maria Teresa Calierno, Paola Lenzi, Francesco Fornai
The present manuscript is an overview of various effects of mTOR up-regulation in astrocytoma with an emphasis on its deleterious effects on the proliferation of Glioblastoma Multiforme. The manuscript reports consistent evidence indicating the occurrence of mTOR up-regulation both in experimental and human astrocytoma. The grading of human astrocytoma is discussed in relationship with mTOR up-regulation. In the second part of the manuscript, the biochemical pathways under the influence of mTOR are translated to cell phenotypes which are generated by mTOR up-regulation and reverted by its inhibition...
October 24, 2016: Histology and Histopathology
N S Bayin, J D Frenster, J R Kane, J Rubenstein, A S Modrek, R Baitalmal, I Dolgalev, K Rudzenski, L Scarabottolo, D Crespi, L Redaelli, M Snuderl, J G Golfinos, W Doyle, D Pacione, E C Parker, A S Chi, A Heguy, D J MacNeil, N Shohdy, D Zagzag, D G Placantonakis
Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly primary brain malignancy with extensive intratumoral hypoxia. Hypoxic regions of GBM contain stem-like cells and are associated with tumor growth and angiogenesis. The molecular mechanisms that regulate tumor growth in hypoxic conditions are incompletely understood. Here, we use primary human tumor biospecimens and cultures to identify GPR133 (ADGRD1), an orphan member of the adhesion family of G-protein-coupled receptors, as a critical regulator of the response to hypoxia and tumor growth in GBM...
October 24, 2016: Oncogenesis
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