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neuro inflammation

Yue Xu, Boyu Yang, Yaguang Hu, Lin Lu, Xi Lu, Jiawei Wang, Fan Xu, Shanshan Yu, Jingjing Huang, Xiaoling Liang
Chronic neuro-inflammation is involved in the death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in glaucoma. The aim of this study is to determine whether wogonin can suppress inflammatory responses and rescue RGCs death after optic nerve crush (ONC), an ideal animal model of glaucoma. Wogonin was administered intraperitoneally 10 min after establishment of ONC model. In this study, wogonin treatment reduced RGCs loss and inhibited RGCs apoptosis demonstrated by the increased Brn3a labeling RGCs at day 14 and the decreased cleaved caspase-3 expression at day 7 after ONC, respectively...
October 16, 2016: Oncotarget
Brandon Coder, Weikan Wang, Liefeng Wang, Zhongdao Wu, Qichuan Zhuge, Dong-Ming Su
The interaction between T cells and the central nervous system (CNS) in homeostasis and injury has been recognized being both pathogenic (CD4+ T-helper 1 - Th1, Th17 and γδT) and ameliorative (Th2 and regulatory T cells - Tregs). However, in-depth studies aimed to elucidate the precise in the aged microenvironment and the dichotomous role of Tregs have just begun and many aspects remain unclear. This is due, not only to a mutual dependency and reciprocal causation of alterations and diseases between the nervous and T cell immune systems, but also to an inconsistent aging of the two systems, which dynamically changes with CNS injury/recovery and/or aging process...
October 11, 2016: Oncotarget
Christian Wächter, Lee E Eiden, Nedye Naumann, Candan Depboylu, Eberhard Weihe
BACKGROUND: The majority of investigations on HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) neglect the cerebellum in spite of emerging evidence for its role in higher cognitive functions and dysfunctions in common neurodegenerative diseases. METHODS: We systematically investigated the molecular and cellular responses of the cerebellum as contributors to lentiviral infection-induced neurodegeneration, in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaque model for HIV infection and HAND...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Neuroinflammation
Sally A Abuelezz, Nevien Hendawy, Yosra Magdy
Depression is a major health problem in which oxidative stress and inflammation are inextricably connected in its pathophysiology. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an important anti-oxidant compound with anti-inflammatory and neuro-protective properties. This study was designed to investigate the hypothesis that CoQ10 by its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials can alleviate depressive- like behavior by restoring the balance of the tryptophan catabolites kynurenine/serotonin toward the serotonin pathway by down-regulation of hippocampal indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO-1)...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology: the Official Journal of the Society on NeuroImmune Pharmacology
Anthony W DeMartino, David F Zigler, Jon M Fukuto, Peter C Ford
The overview presented here has the goal of examining whether carbon disulfide (CS2) may play a role as an endogenously generated bioregulator and/or has therapeutic value. The neuro- and reproductive system toxicity of CS2 has been documented from its long-term use in the viscose rayon industry. CS2 is also used in the production of dithiocarbamates (DTCs), which are potent fungicides and pesticides, thus raising concern that CS2 may be an environmental toxin. However, DTCs also have recognized medicinal use in the treatment of heavy metal poisonings as well as having potency for reducing inflammation...
September 27, 2016: Chemical Society Reviews
Muneer Ahamed, Daisy van Veghel, Christoph Ullmer, Koen Van Laere, Alfons Verbruggen, Guy M Bormans
The type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2) is a member of the endocannabinoid system and is known for its important role in (neuro)inflammation. A PET-imaging agent that allows in vivo visualization of CB2 expression may thus allow quantification of neuroinflammation. In this paper, we report the synthesis, radiosynthesis, biodistribution and in vitro evaluation of a carbon-11 ([(11)C]MA2) and a fluorine-18 ([(18)F]MA3) labeled analog of a highly potent N-arylamide oxadiazole CB2 agonist (EC50 = 0.015 nM). MA2 and MA3 behaved as potent CB2 agonist (EC50: 3 nM and 0...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Biswanath Dinda, Anthony M Kyriakopoulos, Subhajit Dinda, Vassilis Zoumpourlis, Nikolaos S Thomaidis, Aristea Velegraki, Charlambos Markopoulos, Manikarna Dinda
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Cornus mas L. (cornelian cherry) fruits have been used for centuries as traditional cuisine and folk medicine in various countries of Europe and Asia. In folk medicines, the fruits and other parts of the plant have been used for prevention and treatment of a wide range of diseases such as diabetes, diarrhea, gastrointestinal disorders, fevers, rheumatic pain, skin and urinary tract infections, kidney and liver diseases, sunstroke, among others. This review provides a systematic and constructive overview of ethnomedicinal uses, chemical constituents and pharmacological activities of this plant as well as future research need for its commercial utilization as nutraceutical food supplement and medicine...
October 2, 2016: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Patrick Kanju, Wolfgang Liedtke
TRPV4 ion channels are osmo-mechano-TRP channels with pleiotropic function and expression in many different types of tissues and cells. They have also been found involved in pain and inflammation. Studies have focused on the role of TRPV4 in peripheral sensory neurons, but its expression and function in central nervous glial cells and neurons has also been documented. In this overview, based on the senior author's lecture at the recent physiology meeting in Dublin, we concisely review evidence of TRPV4 expression and function in the CNS, and how TRPV4 function can be modulated for therapeutic benefit of neuro-psychiatric disorders...
October 4, 2016: Experimental Physiology
Vincent T Martin, Brinder Vij
BACKGROUND: Comprehensive diets do not require the exclusion of a specific provocative food or ingredient, but regulate the quantities of core components of foods such as vitamins, ions, proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence supporting the use of comprehensive diets in the prevention of migraine and other headache disorders and to discuss the mechanisms through which food, and ingredients within foods and beverages might trigger attacks of headache METHODS: This represents Part 2 of a narrative review of the role of diet in the prevention of migraine and other headache disorders...
October 2016: Headache
Eliseo F Castillo, Handong Zheng, Christian Van Cabanlong, Fei Dong, Yan Luo, Yi Yang, Meilian Liu, Winston W-Y Kao, Xuexian O Yang
TH17 cells play an essential role in the development of both human multiple sclerosis and animal experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Nevertheless, it is not well understood how the pathogenicity of TH17 cells is controlled in the autoimmune neuro-inflammation. In vitro, we found Lumican (Lum), an extracellular matrix protein, is selectively expressed by TH17 cells among tested murine TH subsets. Lum-deficiency leads to earlier onset and enhanced severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis...
September 29, 2016: European Journal of Immunology
Phan Van Kiem, Le Canh Viet Cuong, Bui Huu Tai, Nguyen Xuan Nhiem, Hoang Le Tuan Anh, Tran Hong Quang, Nguyen Thi Thanh Ngan, Hyuncheol Oh, Youn Chul Kim
Two new lignans (7S,7'R,8S,8'R)-3,3'-dimethoxy-7,7'-epoxylignan-4,4',9-triol 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1) and 9-O-formylaviculin (2) together with other thirteen known secondary metabolites were isolated from the leaves of Antidesma hainanensis. Their chemical structures were determined using NMR, ESI-MS, CD spectroscopic methods, and as well as by comparison with those reported in the literature. Neuro-inflammatory activity of isolated compounds was evaluated by their inhibition on NO production in activated BV2 microglial cells...
September 29, 2016: Chemical & Pharmaceutical Bulletin
Anindya Bhattacharya, Wayne C Drevets
Mood disorders are associated with persistently high rates of morbidity and mortality, despite the widespread availability of antidepressant treatments. One limitation to extant therapeutic options has been that nearly all approved antidepressant pharmacotherapies exert a similar primary action of blocking monoamine transporters, and few options exist for transitioning treatment resistant patients to alternatives with distinct mechanisms. An emerging area of science that promises novel pathways to antidepressant and mood-stabilizing therapies has followed from evidence that immunological factors play major roles in the pathophysiology of at least some mood disorder subtypes...
September 28, 2016: Current Topics in Behavioral Neurosciences
Susan Cohen, Xingrao Ke, Qiuli Liu, Qi Fu, Amber Majnik, Robert Lane
BACKGROUND: Adverse maternal lifestyle resulting in adverse early life environment (AELE) increases risks for neuropsychiatric disorders in offspring. Neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with impaired neurogenesis and neuro-inflammation in the hippocampus (HP). Microglia are neuro-inflammatory cells in the brain that regulate neurogenesis via toll-like receptors (TLR). TLR-9 is implicated in neurogenesis inhibition and is responsible for stress-related inflammatory responses. We hypothesized that AELE would increase microglia cell count and increase TLR-9 expression in juvenile mouse HP...
September 22, 2016: International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience
Ingrid H Philippens, Paul R Ormel, Guus Baarends, Maja Johansson, Ed J Remarque, Magnus Doverskog
BACKGROUND: The immune system is increasingly mentioned as a potential target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment. OBJECTIVE: In the present pilot study, the effect of (neuro)inflammation on amyloidopathy was investigated in the marmoset monkey, which has potential as an AD animal model due to its natural cerebral amyloidosis similar to humans. METHODS: Six adult/aged marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were intracranial injected with amyloid-beta (Aβ) fibrils at three cortical locations in the right hemisphere...
September 20, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Donald R Senger, Mien V Hoang, Ki Hyun Kim, Chunshun Li, Shugeng Cao
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Hot aqueous extracts of the plant Barleria lupulina (BL) are used for treating inflammatory conditions and diabetic vascular complications. AIM OF THE STUDY: The goal was to identify active compounds in hot aqueous extracts of BL (HAE-BL) that are consistent with a role in reducing inflammation and reducing the vascular pathology associated with diabetes. In particular, we examined activation of the Nrf2 cell defense pathway because our initial findings indicated that HAE-BL activates Nrf2, and because Nrf2 is known to suppress inflammation...
September 19, 2016: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Francesco Drago, Giulia Ciccarese, Arianna Fay Agnoletti, Francesca Sarocchi, Aurora Parodi
Sweet's syndrome (SS) is an inflammatory disease characterized by fever, leucocytosis and distinctive skin lesions that histologically consist of a dermal infiltrate of neutrophils with nuclear fragmentation. Aseptic neutrophilic inflammation may occur also in other organs. Central nervous system involvement in SS, Neuro-Sweet's syndrome (NSS), is rare and reported especially among Asian patients. A systematic review of the literature has been performed to find articles reporting cases of SS with neurological involvement...
September 22, 2016: Acta Neurologica Belgica
Jens Heyn, Benjamin Luchting, Ludwig C Hinske, Max Hübner, Shahnaz C Azad, Simone Kreth
BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence indicates that neuropathic pain is a neuro-immune disorder with enhanced activation of the immune system. Recent data provided proof that neuropathic pain patients exhibit increased numbers of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs), which may represent an endogenous attempt to limit inflammation and to reduce pain levels. We here investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these alterations. METHODS: Our experimental approach includes functional analyses of primary human T cells, 3'-UTR reporter assays, and expression analyses of neuropathic pain patients' samples...
2016: Journal of Neuroinflammation
Christina Brock, Birgitte Brock, Anne Grave Pedersen, Asbjørn Mohr Drewes, Niels Jessen, Adam D Farmer
The global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing; arguably as a consequence of changes in diet, lifestyle and the trend towards urbanization. Unsurprisingly, the incidence of both micro and macrovascular complications of diabetes mirrors this increasing prevalence. Amongst the complications with the highest symptom burden, yet frequently under-diagnosed and sub-optimally treated, is diabetic autonomic neuropathy, itself potentially resulting in cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and gastrointestinal (GI) tract dysmotility...
August 25, 2016: World Journal of Diabetes
Mathilde Chevin, Clémence Guiraut, Caroline Maurice-Gelinas, Jessica Deslauriers, Sylvain Grignon, Guillaume Sébire
BACKGROUND: Despite the recent introduction of hypothermia as a mandatory standard of care, the incidence of neonatal encephalopathy in full-term newborns and its devastating neuro-behavioral outcomes continues to be a major individual, familial and social issue. Neonatal encephalopathy is mainly due to the compounding and interacting effects of hypoxia-ischemia and inflammation resulting from placental and other perinatal infections. It is unclear why hypothermia is effective in alleviating neonatal encephalopathy in some, but not all, full-term newborns...
September 9, 2016: International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience
C Pellegrini, R Colucci, L Antonioli, E Barocelli, V Ballabeni, N Bernardini, C Blandizzi, W J de Jonge, M Fornai
BACKGROUND: Symptoms of digestive dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) occur at all stages of the disease, often preceding the onset of central motor symptoms. On the basis of these PD-preceding symptoms it has been proposed that PD could initiate in the gut, and that the presence of alpha-synuclein aggregates, or Lewy bodies in the enteric nervous system might represent one of the earliest signs of the disease. Following this hypothesis, much research has been focused on the digestive tract to unravel the mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of PD, with particular attention to the role of alterations in enteric neurotransmission in the pathophysiology of intestinal motility disturbances...
September 9, 2016: Neurogastroenterology and Motility: the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society
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