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Community mobility

Caroline Charette, Krista L Best, Emma M Smith, William C Miller, François Routhier
Background: Mobility limitations represent the third most prevalent cause of disability, affecting more than 1.9 million community-dwelling Canadians. Walking aids are often prescribed to reduce the impacts of mobility impairments. There are limited data on walking aids since 2004. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of walking aid use in Canada and to explore demographic characteristics among users of walking aids. Design: The design used was a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional national survey...
March 14, 2018: Physical Therapy
Weihua Peng, Xiaomin Li, Tong Liu, Yingying Liu, Jinqian Ren, Dawei Liang, Wenhong Fan
Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) was used to stabilize cadmium (Cd) in sediments spiked with Cd. The study found that the Cd in sediments (≤600 mg kg-1 ) was successfully stabilized after 166 d SRB bio-treatment. This was verified by directly and indirectly examining Cd speciation in sediments, mobilization index, and Cd content in interstitial water. After 166 d bio-treatment, compared with control groups, Cd concentrations in interstitial water of Cd-spiked sediments were reduced by 77.6-96.4%. The bioavailable fractions of Cd (e...
March 1, 2018: Chemosphere
J South, A M Connolly, J A Stansfield, P Johnstone, G Henderson, K A Fenton
There is a strong evidence-based rationale for community capacity building and community empowerment as part of a strategic response to reduce health inequalities. Within the current UK policy context, there are calls for increased public engagement in prevention and local decision-making in order to give people greater control over the conditions that determine health. With reference to the challenges and opportunities within the English public health system, this essay seeks to open debate about what is required to mainstream community-centred approaches and ensure that the public is central to public health...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Public Health
Alberto Pilotto, Raffaella Boi, Jean Petermans
Recently, the interest of industry, government agencies and healthcare professionals in technology for aging people has increased. The challenge is whether technology may play a role in enhancing independence and quality of life and in reducing individual and societal costs of caring. Information and communication technologies, i.e. tools aimed at communicating and informing, assistive technologies designed to maintain older peoples' independence and increasing safety, and human-computer interaction technologies for supporting older people with motility and cognitive impairments as humanoid robots, exoskeletons, rehabilitation robots, service robots and companion-type are interdisciplinary topics both in research and in clinical practice...
March 13, 2018: Age and Ageing
Daina L Sturnieks, Sin Lin Yak, Mayna Ratanapongleka, Stephen R Lord, Jasmine C Menant
Fatigue is a common complaint in older people. Laboratory-induced muscle fatigue has been found to affect physical functions in older populations but these protocols are rigorous and are unlikely to accurately reflect daily activities. This study used an ecological approach to determine the effects of a busy day on self-reported fatigue and fall-related measures of physical and cognitive function in older people. Fifty community-dwelling adult volunteers, aged 60-88 (mean 73) years participated in this randomised crossover trial...
March 12, 2018: Experimental Gerontology
Xiangyu Chang, Jingzhou Shen, Xiaoling Lu, Shuai Huang
The emerging Bicycle Sharing System (BSS) provides a new social microscope that allows us to "photograph" the main aspects of the society and to create a comprehensive picture of human mobility behavior in this new medium. BSS has been deployed in many major cities around the world as a short-distance trip supplement for public transportations and private vehicles. A unique value of the bike flow data generated by these BSSs is to understand the human mobility in a short-distance trip. This understanding of the population on short-distance trip is lacking, limiting our capacity in management and operation of BSSs...
2018: PloS One
Michael W Deem, Melia Elizabeth Bonomo
Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) constitute a multi-functional, constantly evolving immune system in bacteria and archaea cells. A heritable, molecular memory is generated of phage, plasmids, or other mobile genetic elements that attempt to attack the cell. This memory is used to recognize and interfere with subsequent invasions from the same genetic elements. This versatile prokaryotic tool has also been used to advance applications in biotechnology...
March 15, 2018: Physical Biology
Nash Ak Witten, Joseph Humphry
The Lana'i Community Health Center (LCHC) like other health care organizations, is striving to implement technology-enabled care (TEC) in the clinical setting. TEC includes such technological innovations as patient portals, mobile phone applications, wearable health sensors, and telehealth. This study examines the utilization of communication technology by members of the Lana'i community and LCHC staff and board members in the home and in their daily lives and evaluates the community's electronic health literacy...
March 2018: Hawai'i Journal of Medicine & Public Health: a Journal of Asia Pacific Medicine & Public Health
Reshma Malick
Prevention in the community and at the workplace is a vital component in substance use disorder treatment and management. Mobilizing the community, creating awareness that addiction to substances is a disease, that it is treatable and that treatment is available are all essential. A cost-effective prevention and treatment approach plays a major role in creating drug free communities. Workplace prevention policies to prevent and manage substance use disorders leads to safer work environments, better motivated teams of workers and a productive workforce...
February 2018: Indian Journal of Psychiatry
Rajeev Seth, Ibukunoluwa Akinboyo, Ankur Chhabra, Yawar Qaiyum, Anita Shet, Nikhil Gupte, Ajay K Jain, Sanjay K Jain
OBJECTIVES: Young children in resource-poor settings remain inadequately immunized. We evaluated the role of compliance-linked incentives versus mobile phone messaging to improve childhood immunizations. METHODS: Children aged ≤24 months from a rural community in India were randomly assigned to either a control group or 1 of 2 study groups. A cloud-based, biometric-linked software platform was used for positive identification, record keeping for all groups, and delivery of automated mobile phone reminders with or without compliance-linked incentives (Indian rupee Rs30 or US dollar $0...
March 14, 2018: Pediatrics
Robert J Miller, Kevin D Lafferty, Thomas Lamy, Li Kui, Andrew Rassweiler, Daniel C Reed
Foundation species define the ecosystems they live in, but ecologists have often characterized dominant plants as foundational without supporting evidence. Giant kelp has long been considered a marine foundation species due to its complex structure and high productivity; however, there is little quantitative evidence to evaluate this. Here, we apply structural equation modelling to a 15-year time series of reef community data to evaluate how giant kelp affects the reef community. Although species richness was positively associated with giant kelp biomass, most direct paths did not involve giant kelp...
March 14, 2018: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Adélaïde Compaoré, Sabine Gies, Bernard Brabin, Halidou Tinto, Loretta Brabin
BACKGROUND: Iron deficiency remains a prevalent adolescent health problem in low income countries. Iron supplementation is recommended but improvement of iron status requires good adherence. OBJECTIVES: We explored factors affecting adolescent adherence to weekly iron and/or folic acid supplements in a setting of low secondary school attendance. METHODS: Taped in-depth interviews were conducted with participants in a randomised, controlled, periconceptional iron supplementation trial for young nulliparous women living in a rural, malaria endemic region of Burkina Faso...
March 14, 2018: Reproductive Health
Liliana Angelica Ponguta, Muneera Abdul Rasheed, Chin Regina Reyes, Aisha Khizar Yousafzai
The international community has set forth global targets that include calls for universal access to high-quality early childhood care and education (ECCE), as indicated in the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals. One major impediment to achieving this target is the lack of a skilled workforce. In this paper, we argue the case for leveraging youth as an untapped resource for supplying the workforce the ECCE system needs. Youth comprise a large proportion of the global population, and historically, although youth experience higher unemployment rates than their adult counterparts, youth are important agents of social awareness, social transformation, and community mobilization in multiple global contexts...
March 2018: New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development
Xiaoyun Wang, Wanqiang Wang, Qiao Gao, Xiaoping Wang, Chaoliang Lei, Fen Zhu
Chrysomya megacephala is a saprophagous fly whose larvae can compost manure and yield biomass and bio-fertilizer simultaneously. However, there are concerns for the safety of the composting system, that is risk of diseases spread by way of manure pathogens, residue of harmful metals and emission of greenhouse gases. Microbiota analysis and heavy metal speciation by European Communities Bureau of Reference were evaluated in raw, C. megacephala-composted and natural stacked swine manure to survey pathogenic bacterial changes and mobility of lead and cadmium in manure after C...
March 14, 2018: Microbial Biotechnology
Piyush Agrawal, Sherry Bhalla, Kumardeep Chaudhary, Rajesh Kumar, Meenu Sharma, Gajendra P S Raghava
This paper describes in silico models developed using a wide range of peptide features for predicting antifungal peptides (AFPs). Our analyses indicate that certain types of residue (e.g., C, G, H, K, R, Y) are more abundant in AFPs. The positional residue preference analysis reveals the prominence of the particular type of residues (e.g., R, V, K) at N-terminus and a certain type of residues (e.g., C, H) at C-terminus. In this study, models have been developed for predicting AFPs using a wide range of peptide features (like residue composition, binary profile, terminal residues)...
2018: Frontiers in Microbiology
Evgeny Krissinel, Ville Uski, Andrey Lebedev, Martyn Winn, Charles Ballard
Modern crystallographic computing is characterized by the growing role of automated structure-solution pipelines, which represent complex expert systems utilizing a number of program components, decision makers and databases. They also require considerable computational resources and regular database maintenance, which is increasingly more difficult to provide at the level of individual desktop-based CCP4 setups. On the other hand, there is a significant growth in data processed in the field, which brings up the issue of centralized facilities for keeping both the data collected and structure-solution projects...
February 1, 2018: Acta Crystallographica. Section D, Structural Biology
Jacqueline C Outermans, Ingrid van de Port, Gert Kwakkel, Johanna M Visser-Meily, Harriet Wittink
BACKGROUND: Reports on the association between aerobic capacity and walking capacity in people after stroke show disparate results. AIM: To determine (1) if the predictive validity of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) for walking capacity post stroke is different from that of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and (2) if postural control, hemiplegic lower extremity muscle strength, age and gender distort the association between aerobic capacity and walking capacity. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study...
March 12, 2018: European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
David P Miller, Nancy Denizard-Thompson, Kathryn E Weaver, L Doug Case, Jennifer L Troyer, John G Spangler, Donna Lawler, Michael P Pignone
Background: Screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) reduces mortality, yet more than one third of age-eligible Americans are unscreened. Objective: To examine the effect of a digital health intervention, Mobile Patient Technology for Health-CRC (mPATH-CRC), on rates of CRC screening. Design: Randomized clinical trial. ( NCT02088333). Setting: 6 community-based primary care practices. Participants: 450 patients (223 in the mPATH-CRC group and 227 in usual care) scheduled for a primary care visit and due for routine CRC screening...
March 13, 2018: Annals of Internal Medicine
Charles E Sepers, Stephen B Fawcett, Ithar Hassaballa, Florence DiGennaro Reed, Jerry Schultz, Davison Munodawafa, Peter Malekele Phori, Ephraim Chiriseri
Implementation of the Ebola response was credited with reducing incidence of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa; however little is known about the amount and kind of Ebola response activities that were ultimately successful in addressing the 2014 outbreak. We collaboratively monitored Ebola response activities and associated effects in Margibi County, Liberia, a rural county in Liberia deeply affected by the outbreak. We used a participatory monitoring and evaluation system, including key informant interviews and document review, to systematically document activities, code them, characterize their contextual features, and discover and communicate patterns in Ebola response activities to essential stakeholders...
February 24, 2018: Health Promotion International
Michael A Moncrieff, Pierre Lienard
Our research brings to light features of the social world that impact moral judgments and how they do so. The moral vignette data presented were collected in rural and urban Croatian communities that were involved to varying degrees in the Croatian Homeland War. We argue that rapid shifts in moral accommodations during periods of violent social strife can be explained by considering the role that coordination and social agents' ability to reconfigure their social network (i.e., relational mobility) play in moral reasoning...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
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