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Viktor S Kokhan, Marina I Matveeva, Azat Mukhametov, Andrey S Shtemberg
Space flight factors (SFF) significantly affect the operating activity of astronauts during deep space missions. Gravitational overloads, hypo-magnetic field and ionizing radiation are the main SFF that perturb the normal activity of the central nervous system (CNS). Acute and chronic CNS risks include alterations in cognitive abilities, reduction of motor functions and behavioural changes. Multiple experimental works have been devoted to the SFF effects on integrative functional activity of the brain; however, the model parameters utilized have not always been ideal and consistent...
October 15, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Stephen J Greene, Gregg C Fonarow, Scott D Solomon, Haris P Subacius, Andrew P Ambrosy, Muthiah Vaduganathan, Aldo P Maggioni, Michael Böhm, Eldrin F Lewis, Faiez Zannad, Javed Butler, Mihai Gheorghiade
AIMS: Change in NT-proBNP level is a common surrogate endpoint in early phase heart failure (HF) trials, but whether this endpoint is influenced by atrial fibrillation/flutter (AFF) is unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: This analysis included 1358 patients from the ASTRONAUT trial, which randomized patients hospitalized for HF with EF ≤40% to aliskiren or placebo in addition to standard care. Patients were stratified by presence of AFF on baseline ECG. NT-proBNP was measured longitudinally by a core laboratory at baseline, 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months...
October 17, 2016: European Journal of Heart Failure
Vipan K Parihar, Barrett D Allen, Chongshan Caressi, Stephanie Kwok, Esther Chu, Katherine K Tran, Nicole N Chmielewski, Erich Giedzinski, Munjal M Acharya, Richard A Britten, Janet E Baulch, Charles L Limoli
The Mars mission will result in an inevitable exposure to cosmic radiation that has been shown to cause cognitive impairments in rodent models, and possibly in astronauts engaged in deep space travel. Of particular concern is the potential for cosmic radiation exposure to compromise critical decision making during normal operations or under emergency conditions in deep space. Rodents exposed to cosmic radiation exhibit persistent hippocampal and cortical based performance decrements using six independent behavioral tasks administered between separate cohorts 12 and 24 weeks after irradiation...
October 10, 2016: Scientific Reports
Cara L Benjamin, Raymond P Stowe, Lisa St John, Clarence F Sams, Satish K Mehta, Brian E Crucian, Duane L Pierson, Krishna V Komanduri
Following the advent of molecular assays that measure T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) present in recent thymic emigrants, it has been conclusively shown that thymopoiesis persists in most adults, but that functional output decreases with age, influencing the maintenance of a diverse and functional T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire. Space flight has been shown to result in a variety of phenotypic and functional changes in human T cells and in the reactivation of latent viruses. While space flight has been shown to influence thymic architecture in rodents, thymopoiesis has not previously been assessed in astronauts...
August 4, 2016: JCI Insight
Bryan J Feger, J Will Thompson, Laura G Dubois, Reddy P Kommaddi, Matthew W Foster, Rajashree Mishra, Sudha K Shenoy, Yoichiro Shibata, Yared H Kidane, M Arthur Moseley, Lisa S Carnell, Dawn E Bowles
On Earth, biological systems have evolved in response to environmental stressors, interactions dictated by physical forces that include gravity. The absence of gravity is an extreme stressor and the impact of its absence on biological systems is ill-defined. Astronauts who have spent extended time under conditions of minimal gravity (microgravity) experience an array of biological alterations, including perturbations in cardiovascular function. We hypothesized that physiological perturbations in cardiac function in microgravity may be a consequence of alterations in molecular and organellar dynamics within the cellular milieu of cardiomyocytes...
September 27, 2016: Scientific Reports
Francis A Cucinotta, Nobuyuki Hamada, Mark P Little
Previous analysis has shown that astronauts have a significantly lower standardized mortality ratio for circulatory disease mortality compared to the U.S. population, which is consistent with the rigorous selection process and healthy lifestyles of astronauts, and modest space radiation exposures from past space missions. However, a recent report by Delp et al. estimated the proportional mortality ratio for ages of 55-64 y of Apollo lunar mission astronauts to claim a high risk of cardiovascular disease due to space radiation compared to the U...
August 2016: Life Sciences in Space Research
D Chuard, V Anthonipillai, R Dendale, C Nauraye, E Khan, C Mabit, L De Marzi, L Narici
Particle therapy provides an opportunity to study the human response to space radiation in ground-based facilities. On this basis, a study of light flashes analogous to astronauts' phosphenes reported by patients undergoing ocular proton therapy has been undertaken. The influence of treatment parameters on phosphene generation was investigated for 430 patients treated for a choroidal melanoma at the proton therapy centre of the Institut Curie (ICPO) in Orsay, France, between 2008 and 2011. 60% of them report light flashes, which are predominantly (74%) blue...
August 2016: Life Sciences in Space Research
Richard A Britten, Vania D Miller, Melissa M Hadley, Jessica S Jewell, Evangeline Macadat
NASA is currently conducting ground based experiments to determine whether the radiation environment that astronauts will encounter on deep space missions will have an impact on their long-term health and their ability to complete the various tasks during the mission. Emerging data suggest that exposure of rodents to mission-relevant HZE radiation doses does result in the impairment of various neurocognitive processes. An essential part of mission planning is a probabilistic risk assessment process that takes into account the likely incidence and severity of a problem...
August 2016: Life Sciences in Space Research
Richard L Hughson, Nicholas J Yee, Danielle K Greaves
BACKGROUND: Elevated ambient Pco2 in the International Space Station (ISS) has been cited as a potential contributor to the vision impairment intracranial pressure syndrome (VIIP), a significant health risk for astronauts during long-duration space missions. The elevation in ambient Pco2 is rather modest and normal respiratory compensation could minimize the impact on arterial Pco2. METHODS: In nine male astronauts, breaths measured prior to a rebreathing maneuver were examined to assess inspired and end-tidal Pco2 during upright seated preflight and in-flight conditions...
2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Michael A Williams, Jan Malm, Anders Eklund, Nicholas J Horton, Susan E Voss
BACKGROUND: A noninvasive method to monitor changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) is required for astronauts on long-duration spaceflight who are at risk of developing the Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure syndrome that has some, but not all of the features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. We assessed the validity of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to detect changes in ICP. METHODS: Subjects were eight patients undergoing medically necessary diagnostic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infusion testing for hydrocephalus...
2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Otmar Bock, Nils Bury
INTRODUCTION: To flip a switch "down," our motor system can normally rely on concordant visual, gravitational, and egocentric cues about the vertical. However, divers must sometimes perform this task while visual cues are limited and gravitational cues are misaligned with egocentric cues. Astronauts must also flip switches "down" in absence of gravitational cues. Our study evaluates this ability using a laboratory simulation. METHODS: The subjects were 24 healthy volunteers who were blindfolded, tilted into different angles of roll, and asked to silence an alarm by flipping a switch "down...
2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Julielynn Y Wong, Andreas C Pfahnl
INTRODUCTION: The first space-based fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printer became operational in 2014. This study evaluated whether Mars simulation crewmembers of the Hawai'i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) II mission with no prior surgical experience could utilize acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic surgical instruments FDM 3D printed on Earth to complete simulated surgical tasks. METHODS: This study sought to examine the feasibility of using 3D printed surgical tools when the primary crew medical officer is incapacitated and the back-up crew medical officer must conduct a surgical procedure during a simulated extended space mission...
September 2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Dan Pan, Yijing Zhang, Zhizhong Li, Zhiqiang Tian
BACKGROUND: A number of space activities (e.g., extravehicular astronaut rescue, cooperation in satellite services, space station supplies, and assembly) are implemented directly or assisted by remote robotic arms. Our study aimed to reveal those individual characteristics which could positively influence or even predict teleoperation performance of such a space robotic arm. METHODS: There were 64 male volunteers without robot operation experience recruited for the study...
September 2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
Jayter Silva Paula, Sanjay Girdhari Asrani, Eduardo Melani Rocha
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2016: Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia
Raktim Roy, P Phani Shilpa, Sangram Bagh
UNLABELLED: Bacteria are important organisms for space missions due to their increased pathogenesis in microgravity that poses risks to the health of astronauts and for projected synthetic biology applications at the space station. We understand little about the effect, at the molecular systems level, of microgravity on bacteria, despite their significant incidence. In this study, we proposed a systems biology pipeline and performed an analysis on published gene expression data sets from multiple seminal studies on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under spaceflight and simulated microgravity conditions...
September 2016: Astrobiology
Yunqi Wang, Weiqi Liu, Xiangxiang Meng, Hanyi Fu, Daliang Zhang, Yusi Kang, Rui Feng, Zhonglun Wei, Xiuqing Zhu, Guohua Jiang
To resolve the contradiction between large field of view and high resolution in immersive virtual reality (VR) head-mounted displays (HMDs), an HMD monocular optical system with a large field of view and high resolution was designed. The system was fabricated by adopting aspheric technology with CNC grinding and a high-resolution LCD as the image source. With this monocular optical system, an HMD binocular optical system with a wide-range continuously adjustable interpupillary distance was achieved in the form of partially overlapping fields of view (FOV) combined with a screw adjustment mechanism...
September 1, 2016: Applied Optics
George C Brainard, Laura K Barger, Robert R Soler, John P Hanifin
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review addresses the development of a new solid-state lighting system for the International Space Station (ISS) that is intended to enhance the illumination of the working and living environment of astronauts and to improve sleep, circadian entrainment, and daytime alertness. RECENT FINDINGS: Spaceflight missions often expose astronauts and mission support ground crews to atypical sleep-wake cycles and work schedules. A recent, extensive study describes the sleep characteristics and use of sleep-promoting pharmaceuticals in astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight...
November 2016: Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine
J S Willey, A T Kwok, J E Moore, V Payne, C A Lindburg, S A Balk, J Olson, P J Black, M C Walb, R R Yammani, M T Munley
There is little known about the effect of both reduced weight bearing and exposure to radiation during spaceflight on the mechanically-sensitive cartilage lining the knee joint. In this study, we characterized cartilage damage in rat knees after periods of reduced weight bearing with/without exposure to solar-flare-relevant radiation, then cartilage recovery after return to weight bearing. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 120) were either hindlimb unloaded (HLU) via tail suspension or remained weight bearing in cages (GROUND)...
September 7, 2016: Radiation Research
Koh Mizuno, Akiko Matsumoto, Tatsuya Aiba, Takashi Abe, Hiroshi Ohshima, Masaya Takahashi, Yuichi Inoue
BACKGROUND: Flight controllers of the International Space Station (ISS) are engaged in shift work to provide 24-h coverage to support ISS systems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of shift work sleep disorder (SWSD) among Japanese ISS flight controllers. METHODS: A questionnaire study was conducted using the Standard Shiftwork Index to evaluate sleep-related problems and possible associated variables. Among 52 respondents out of 73 flight controllers, 30 subjects were identified as night shift workers who worked 3 or more night shifts per month...
2016: Journal of Physiological Anthropology
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