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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28546470/ocular-changes-over-60-minutes-in-supine-and-prone-postures
#1
Allison P Anderson, Gautam Babu, Jacob G Swan, Scott D Phillips, Darin A Knaus, Christine M Toutain-Kidd, Michael E Zegans, Abigail M Fellows, Jiang Gui, Jay C Buckey
Some astronauts are returning from long duration spaceflight with structural ocular and visual changes. We investigated both the transient and sustained effects of changes in the direction of the gravity vector acting on the eye using changes in body posture. Intraocular pressure (IOP-Perkins tonometer), ocular geometry (axial length, corneal thickness, and aqueous depth-noncontact biometer), and the choroidal (volume and subfoveal thickness optical coherence tomography) was measured in 10 subjects (5M, 5F)...
May 25, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28546443/astronaut-ophthalmic-syndrome
#2
Sara R Zwart, Charles R Gibson, Jesse F Gregory, Thomas H Mader, Patrick J Stover, Steven H Zeisel, Scott M Smith
During and after missions on the International Space Station, some astronauts experience ophthalmic changes, including choroidal folds, optic disc edema, cotton-wool spots, globe flattening, and refraction changes. Astronauts with ophthalmic issues had significantly higher plasma concentrations of metabolites that are associated with the 1-carbon metabolic pathway than those without ophthalmic issues. We hypothesized that genetic differences might explain the metabolite differences. Indeed, genetics and B vitamin status were significant predictors of ophthalmic issues...
May 25, 2017: FASEB Journal: Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28539145/workplace-social-support-and-behavioral-health-prior-to-long-duration-spaceflight
#3
Charlene A Deming, Jennifer J Vasterling
INTRODUCTION: Preparation and training for long-duration spaceflight bring with them psychosocial stressors potentially affecting the well-being and performance of astronauts, before and during spaceflight. Social support from within the workplace may mitigate behavioral health concerns arising during the preflight period and enhance resiliency before and during extended missions. The purpose of this review was to evaluate evidence addressing the viability of workplace social support as a pre-mission countermeasure, specifically addressing: 1) the observed relationships between workplace social support and behavioral health; 2) perceived need, acceptability, and format preference for workplace social support among high-achievers; 3) potential barriers to delivery/receipt of workplace social support; 4) workplace social support interventions; and 5) delivery timeframe and anticipated duration of workplace social support countermeasure benefits...
June 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28539140/hemoglobin-oxygen-saturation-with-mild-hypoxia-and-microgravity
#4
Johnny Conkin, James H Wessel, Jason R Norcross, Omar S Bekdash, Andrew F J Abercromby, Matthew D Koslovsky, Michael L Gernhardt
INTRODUCTION: Microgravity (μG) exposure and even early recovery from μG in combination with mild hypoxia may increase the alveolar-arterial oxygen (O2) partial pressure gradient. METHODS: Four male astronauts on STS-69 (1995) and four on STS-72 (1996) were exposed on Earth to an acute sequential hypoxic challenge by breathing for 4 min 18.0%, 14.9%, 13.5%, 12.9%, and 12.2% oxygen-balance nitrogen. The 18.0% O2 mixture at sea level resulted in an inspired O2 partial pressure (PIo2) of 127 mmHg...
June 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28537495/remotely-guided-breast-sonography-for-long-term-space-missions-a-case-report-and-discussion
#5
Jackelynne P Silva-Martinez, Andreia Sorice Genaro, Hui Annie Wen, Naama Glauber, Thais Russomano
BACKGROUND: Space radiation can cause different types of cancers in crewmembers, especially during long-term space missions. INTRODUCTION: To date, a complete bilateral breast ultrasound has not been performed at the International Space Station (ISS). A breast screening imaging technique could be a useful tool for early identification of breast cancer in astronauts. We hypothesized that breast ultrasound performed by a crewmember while being remotely guided by a specialist from the ground could be an essential tool for medical diagnosis in space...
May 24, 2017: Telemedicine Journal and E-health: the Official Journal of the American Telemedicine Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533143/drugs-in-space-pharmacokinetics-and-pharmacodynamics-in-astronauts
#6
Johannes Kast, Yichao Yu, Christoph N Seubert, Virginia E Wotring, Hartmut Derendorf
Space agencies are working intensely to push the current boundaries of human spaceflight by sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before, including missions to Mars and asteroids. Spaceflight alters human physiology due to fluid shifts, muscle and bone loss, immune system dysregulation, and changes in the gastrointestinal tract and metabolic enzymes. These alterations may change the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of medications used by astronauts and subsequently might impact drug efficacy and safety...
May 19, 2017: European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28528322/very-low-doses-of-heavy-oxygen-ion-radiation-induce-premature-ovarian-failure
#7
Birendra Mishra, Ryan Ripperdan, Laura Ortiz, Ulrike Luderer
Astronauts are exposed to charged particles during space travel, and charged particles are also used for cancer radiotherapy. Premature ovarian failure is a well-known side-effect of conventional, low linear energy transfer (LET) cancer radiotherapy, but little is known about the effects of high LET charged particles on the ovary. We hypothesized that lower LET (16.5 keV/µm) oxygen particles would be less damaging to the ovary than we previously found for iron (LET=179 keV/µm). Adult female mice were irradiated with 0, 5, 30, or 50 cGy oxygen ions or 50 cGy oxygen plus dietary supplementation with the antioxidant alpha lipoic acid (ALA)...
May 20, 2017: Reproduction: the Official Journal of the Society for the Study of Fertility
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28500304/microgravity-induces-inhibition-of-osteoblastic-differentiation-and-mineralization-through-abrogating-primary-cilia
#8
Wengui Shi, Yanfang Xie, Jinpeng He, Jian Zhou, Yuhai Gao, Wenjun Wei, Nan Ding, Huiping Ma, Cory J Xian, Keming Chen, Jufang Wang
It is well documented that microgravity in space environment leads to bone loss in astronauts. These physiological changes have also been validated by human and animal studies and modeled in cell-based analogs. However, the underlying mechanisms are elusive. In the current study, we identified a novel phenomenon that primary cilia (key sensors and functioning organelles) of rat calvarial osteoblasts (ROBs) gradually shrank and disappeared almost completely after exposure to simulated microgravity generated by a random positioning machine (RPM)...
May 12, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28495842/the-impact-of-ocular-hemodynamics-and-intracranial-pressure-on-intraocular-pressure-during-acute-gravitational-changes
#9
Emily S Nelson, Lealem Mulugeta, Andrew Feola, Julia Raykin, Jerry G Myers, Brian C Samuels, C Ross Ethier
Exposure to microgravity causes a bulk fluid shift toward the head, with concomitant changes in blood volume/pressure, intraocular pressure (IOP), and intracranial pressure (ICP). These and other factors are thought to contribute to Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure syndrome, a significant health concern for astronauts, characterized by degradation of visual function and ocular anatomical changes. Here we describe a lumped-parameter numerical model to simulate volume/pressure alterations in the eye during gravitational changes...
May 11, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28495841/lower-body-negative-pressure-decreases-non-invasively-measured-intracranial-pressure-and-internal-jugular-vein-cross-sectional-area-during-head-down-tilt
#10
William Watkins, Alan R Hargens, Shannon Baird, Erika Marie Clary, Brandon R Macias
INTRODUCTION: Long-term space flight induces a near visual acuity change in approximately 50% of astronauts. In some crew members, postflight cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressures by lumbar puncture are as high as 20.9 mmHg who demonstrated optic disc edema. CSF communicates through the cochlear aqueduct to affect perilymphatic pressure and tympanic membrane motion. We hypothesized that 50 mmHg of lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) during 15° head-down tilt (HDT) would mitigate elevations in internal jugular vein cross-sectional area (IJV CSA) and intracranial pressure (ICP)...
May 11, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28495755/intestinal-microbiota-contributes-to-colonic-epithelial-changes-in-simulated-microgravity-mouse-model
#11
Junxiu Shi, Yifan Wang, Jian He, Pingping Li, Rong Jin, Ke Wang, Xi Xu, Jie Hao, Yan Zhang, Hongju Liu, Xiaoping Chen, Hounan Wu, Qing Ge
Exposure to microgravity leads to alterations in multiple systems, but microgravity-related changes in the gastrointestinal tract and its clinical significance have not been well studied. We used the hindlimb unloading (HU) mouse model to simulate a microgravity condition and investigated the changes in intestinal microbiota and colonic epithelial cells. Compared with ground controls (Ctrls), HU affected fecal microbiota composition with a profile that was characterized by the expansion of Firmicutes and decrease of Bacteroidetes The colon epithelium of HU mice showed decreased goblet cell numbers, reduced epithelial cell turnover, and decreased expression of genes that are involved in defense and inflammatory responses...
May 11, 2017: FASEB Journal: Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28492348/culture-of-human-cells-in-experimental-units-for-spaceflight-impacts-on-their-behavior
#12
Alessandra Cazzaniga, Claudia Moscheni, Jeanette Am Maier, Sara Castiglioni
Because space missions produce pathophysiological alterations such as cardiovascular disorders and bone demineralization which are very common on Earth, biomedical research in space is a frontier that holds important promises not only to counterbalance space-associated disorders in astronauts but also to ameliorate the health of Earth-bound population. Experiments in space are complex to design. Cells must be cultured in closed cell culture systems (from now defined experimental units (EUs)), which are biocompatible, functional, safe to minimize any potential hazard to the crew, and with a high degree of automation...
May 2017: Experimental Biology and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28490676/excretion-of-zinc-and-copper-increases-in-men-during-3-weeks-of-bed-rest-with-or-without-artificial-gravity
#13
Hayley N Heacox, Patricia L Gillman, Sara R Zwart, Scott M Smith
Background: Zinc and copper have many physiologic functions and little or no functional storage capability, so persistent losses of either element present health concerns, especially during extended-duration space missions.Objectives: We evaluated the effects of short-term bed rest (BR), a spaceflight analog, on copper and zinc metabolism to better understand the role of these nutrients in human adaptation to (simulated) spaceflight. We also investigated the effect of artificial gravity on copper and zinc homeostasis...
May 10, 2017: Journal of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28460775/tele-echocardiography-made-for-astronauts-now-in-hospitals
#14
REVIEW
M Balasingam, J Ebrahim, I A Ariffin
Telemedicine, ie 'the delivery of healthcare and sharing of medical knowledge using telecommunication systems' has penetrated every field of medicine. As a result, tele-echocardiography, the study of the heart via telemedicine started expanding. Ironically, space became the next frontier for mankind's new innovations and technology pursuit. However, the microgravity environment of space is known to be challenging to astronauts hearts. As such, new tele-echocardiography techniques have evolved. The main aim was to research a system that can be operated by a layperson but still be able to provide high yield diagnostic information in real time to specialists on earth...
March 2017: Indian Heart Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28430554/role-of-cerebrospinal-fluid-in-spaceflight-induced-ocular-changes-and-visual-impairment-in-astronauts
#15
Noam Alperin, Ahmet M Bagci, Carlos J Oliu, Sang H Lee, Byron L Lam
Purpose To determine the respective roles of vascular and cerebrospinal fluids in spaceflight-induced vision impairment in astronauts, known as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration institutional review board and is HIPAA compliant. All subjects provided written informed consent. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data from nine astronauts (mean age, 46.9 years) who flew on the space shuttle (14...
April 21, 2017: Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28427408/time-averaged-simulated-microgravity-tasmg-inhibits-proliferation-of-lymphoma-cells-l-540-and-hdlm-2-using-a-3d-clinostat
#16
Yoon Jae Kim, Ae Jin Jeong, Myungjoon Kim, Chiwon Lee, Sang-Kyu Ye, Sungwan Kim
BACKGROUND: Gravity is omnipresent on Earth; however, humans in space, such as astronauts at the International Space Station, experience microgravity. Long-term exposure to microgravity is considered to elicit physiological changes, such as muscle atrophy, in the human body. In addition, certain types of cancer cells demonstrate inhibited proliferation under condition of time-averaged simulated microgravity (taSMG). However, the response of human Hodgkin's lymphoma cancer cells to reduced gravity, and the associated physiological changes in these cells, have not been elucidated...
April 20, 2017: Biomedical Engineering Online
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421821/modeling-and-dynamic-simulation-of-astronaut-s-upper-limb-motions-considering-counter-torques-generated-by-the-space-suit
#17
Jingwen Li, Qing Ye, Li Ding, Qianfang Liao
Extravehicular activity (EVA) is an inevitable task for astronauts to maintain proper functions of both the spacecraft and the space station. Both experimental research in a microgravity simulator (e.g. neutral buoyancy tank, zero-g aircraft or a drop tower/tube) and mathematical modeling were used to study EVA to provide guidance for the training on Earth and task design in space. Modeling has become more and more promising because of its efficiency. Based on the task analysis, almost 90% of EVA activity is accomplished through upper limb motions...
April 19, 2017: Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28417839/mortality-due-to-cardiovascular-disease-among-apollo-lunar-astronauts
#18
Robert J Reynolds, Steven M Day
INTRODUCTION: Recent research has postulated increased cardiovascular mortality for astronauts who participated in the Apollo lunar missions. The conclusions, however, are based on small numbers of astronauts, are derived from methods with known weaknesses, and are not consistent with prior research. METHODS: Records for NASA astronauts and U.S. Air Force astronauts were analyzed to produce standardized mortality ratios. Lunar astronauts were compared to astronauts who have never flown in space (nonflight astronauts), those who have only flown missions in low Earth orbit (LEO astronauts), and the U...
May 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28372057/a-study-of-voice-production-characteristics-of-astronuat-speech-during-apollo-11-for-speaker-modeling-in-space
#19
Chengzhu Yu, John H L Hansen
Human physiology has evolved to accommodate environmental conditions, including temperature, pressure, and air chemistry unique to Earth. However, the environment in space varies significantly compared to that on Earth and, therefore, variability is expected in astronauts' speech production mechanism. In this study, the variations of astronaut voice characteristics during the NASA Apollo 11 mission are analyzed. Specifically, acoustical features such as fundamental frequency and phoneme formant structure that are closely related to the speech production system are studied...
March 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28360122/increased-cerebral-blood-volume-pulsatility-during-head-down-tilt-with-elevated-carbon-dioxide-the-spacecot-study
#20
Gary E Strangman, Quan Zhang, Karina Marshall-Goebel, Edwin Mulder, Brian Stevens, Jonathan B Clark, Eric M Bershad
Astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) have exhibited hyperopic shifts, posterior eye globe flattening, dilated optic nerve sheaths, and even optic disc swelling from spaceflight. Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) consequent to cephalad fluid shifts is commonly hypothesized as contributing to these ocular changes. Head-down tilt (HDT) is frequently utilized as an Earth-based analog to study similar fluid shifts. Sealed environments like the ISS also exhibit elevated carbon dioxide (CO2), a potent arteriolar vasodilator that could further affect cerebral blood volume and flow, intracranial compliance, and ICP...
March 30, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
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