keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Viccellio

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25921206/is-boarding-appropriate-to-help-reduce-crowding-in-emergency-departments
#1
REVIEW
Adrian Boyle, Peter Viccellio, Chris Whale
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2015: BMJ: British Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24063879/patients-overwhelmingly-prefer-inpatient-boarding-to-emergency-department-boarding
#2
Peter Viccellio, Joseph A Zito, Valerie Sayage, Jasmine Chohan, Gregory Garra, Carolyn Santora, Adam J Singer
BACKGROUND: Boarding of admitted patients in the emergency department (ED) is a major cause of crowding. One alternative to boarding in the ED, a full-capacity protocol where boarded patients are redeployed to inpatient units, can reduce crowding and improve overall flow. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to compare patient satisfaction with boarding in the ED vs. inpatient hallways. METHODS: We performed a structured telephone survey regarding patient experiences and preferences for boarding among admitted ED patients who experienced boarding in the ED hallway and then were subsequently transferred to inpatient hallways...
December 2013: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24029909/the-five-ws-for-information-visualization-with-application-to-healthcare-informatics
#3
Zhiyuan Zhang, Bing Wang, Faisal Ahmed, I V Ramakrishnan, Rong Zhao, Asa Viccellio, Klaus Mueller
The Five Ws is a popular concept for information gathering in journalistic reporting. It captures all aspects of a story or incidence: who, when, what, where, and why. We propose a framework composed of a suite of cooperating visual information displays to represent the Five Ws and demonstrate its use within a healthcare informatics application. Here, the who is the patient, the where is the patient's body, and the when, what, why is a reasoning chain which can be interactively sorted and brushed. The patient is represented as a radial sunburst visualization integrated with a stylized body map...
November 2013: IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23751321/the-five-w-s-for-information-visualization-with-application-to-healthcare-informatics
#4
Zhiyuan Zhang, Bing Wang, Faisal Ahmed, Iv Ramakrishnan, Rong Zhao, Asa Viccellio, Klaus Mueller
The Five W's is a popular concept for information gathering in journalistic reporting. It captures all aspects of a story or incidence: who, when, what, where, and why. We propose a framework composed of a suite of cooperating visual information displays to represent the Five W's and demonstrate its use within a healthcare informatics application. Here, the who is the patient, the where is the patient's body, and the when, what, why is a reasoning chain which can be interactively sorted and brushed. The patient is represented as a radial sunburst visualization integrated with a stylized body map...
June 3, 2013: IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23684682/associations-between-routine-coronary-computed-tomographic-angiography-and-reduced-unnecessary-hospital-admissions-length-of-stay-recidivism-rates-and-invasive-coronary-angiography-in-the-emergency-department-triage-of-chest-pain
#5
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Michael Poon, Michael Cortegiano, Alexander J Abramowicz, Margaret Hines, Adam J Singer, Mark C Henry, Peter Viccellio, Jeffrey C Hellinger, Summer Ferraro, Annie Poon, Gilbert L Raff, Szilard Voros, Michael E Farkouh, Pamela Noack
OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to assess the effects on resource utilization of routine coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) in triaging chest pain patients in the emergency department (ED). BACKGROUND: The routine use of CCTA for ED evaluation of chest pain is feasible and safe. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective multivariate analysis of data from two risk-matched cohorts of 894 ED patients presenting with chest pain to assess the impact of CCTA versus standard evaluation on admissions rate, length of stay, major adverse cardiovascular event rates, recidivism rates, and downstream resource utilization...
August 6, 2013: Journal of the American College of Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22168198/the-association-between-length-of-emergency-department-boarding-and-mortality
#6
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Adam J Singer, Henry C Thode, Peter Viccellio, Jesse M Pines
OBJECTIVES: Emergency department (ED) boarding has been associated with several negative patient-oriented outcomes, from worse satisfaction to higher inpatient mortality rates. The current study evaluates the association between length of ED boarding and outcomes. The authors expected that prolonged ED boarding of admitted patients would be associated with higher mortality rates and longer hospital lengths of stay (LOS). METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study set at a suburban academic ED with an annual ED census of 90,000 visits...
December 2011: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22168191/practical-implications-of-implementing-emergency-department-crowding-interventions-summary-of-a-moderated-panel
#7
REVIEW
Jesse M Pines, Randy L Pilgrim, Sandra M Schneider, Bruce Siegel, Peter Viccellio
Emergency department (ED) crowding continues to be a major public health problem in the United States and around the world. In June 2011, the Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference focused on exploring interventions to alleviate ED crowding and to generate a series of research agendas on the topic. As part of the conference, a panel of leaders in the emergency care community shared their perspectives on emergency care, crowding, and some of the fundamental issues facing emergency care today. The panel participants included Drs...
December 2011: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/19345442/the-association-between-transfer-of-emergency-department-boarders-to-inpatient-hallways-and-mortality-a-4-year-experience
#8
Asa Viccellio, Carolyn Santora, Adam J Singer, Henry C Thode, Mark C Henry
STUDY OBJECTIVE: We developed and implemented an institutional protocol aimed at reducing crowding by admitting boarded patients to hospital inpatient hallways. We hypothesized that transfer of admitted patients from the emergency department (ED) to inpatient hallways would be feasible and not create patient harm. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study in a suburban, academic ED with an annual census of 70,000. We studied consecutive patients admitted from our ED between January 2004 and January 2008...
October 2009: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/19133856/there-may-be-no-room-in-the-inn-but-the-innkeepers-sure-are-happy
#9
EDITORIAL
Peter Viccellio
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2009: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/18370985/introduction-of-a-stat-laboratory-reduces-emergency-department-length-of-stay
#10
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Adam J Singer, Peter Viccellio, Henry C Thode, Jay L Bock, Mark C Henry
OBJECTIVES: Emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS) impacts patient satisfaction and overcrowding. Laboratory turnaround time (TAT) is a major determinant of ED LOS. The authors determined the impact of a Stat laboratory (Stat lab) on ED LOS. The authors hypothesized that a Stat lab would reduce ED LOS for admitted patients by 1 hour. METHODS: This was a before-and-after study conducted at an academic suburban ED with 75,000 annual patient visits. All patients presenting to the ED during the months of August and October 2006 were considered...
April 2008: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/17963981/emergency-department-activation-of-an-interventional-cardiology-team-reduces-door-to-balloon-times-in-st-segment-elevation-myocardial-infarction
#11
Adam J Singer, Amit Shembekar, Farid Visram, Joshua Schiller, Valerie Russo, William Lawson, Carol A Gomes, Carolyn Santora, Mary Maliszewski, Lisa Wilbert, Eileen Dowdy, Peter Viccellio, Mark C Henry
STUDY OBJECTIVE: American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines recommend door-to-balloon times of fewer than 90 minutes in patients with acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. We hypothesized that immediate activation of an interventional cardiology team (code H) would reduce the time to percutaneous coronary intervention by 1 hour and increase the proportion of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes of arrival. METHODS: Study design was a before-and-after trial in an academic suburban emergency department (ED) with a certified cardiac catheterization laboratory...
November 2007: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/17937971/customer-satisfaction-versus-patient-safety-have-we-lost-our-way
#12
EDITORIAL
Peter Viccellio
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2008: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/17719694/turnaround-time-and-transaction-costs
#13
EDITORIAL
Peter Viccellio
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2008: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/16418311/performance-of-a-decision-rule-to-predict-need-for-computed-tomography-among-children-with-blunt-head-trauma
#14
MULTICENTER STUDY
Jennifer A Oman, Richelle J Cooper, James F Holmes, Peter Viccellio, Andrew Nyce, Steven E Ross, Jerome R Hoffman, William R Mower et al.
OBJECTIVE: To assess the ability of the NEXUS II head trauma decision instrument to identify patients with clinically important intracranial injury (ICI) from among children with blunt head trauma. METHODS: An analysis was conducted of the pediatric cohort involved in the derivation set of National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study II (NEXUS II), a prospective, observational, multicenter study of all patients who had blunt head trauma and underwent cranial computed tomography (CT) imaging at 1 of 21 emergency departments...
February 2006: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/16204140/telemetry-monitoring-during-transport-of-low-risk-chest-pain-patients-from-the-emergency-department-is-it-necessary
#15
Adam J Singer, Farid Visram, Amit Shembekar, Mustafah Khwaja, Asa Viccellio
BACKGROUND: Low-risk emergency department (ED) patients with chest pain (CP) are often transported by nurses to monitored beds on telemetry monitoring, diverting valuable resources from the ED and delaying transport. OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that transporting low-risk CP patients off telemetry monitoring is safe. METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of a prospective, observational cohort of ED patients with low-risk chest pain (no active chest pain, normal or nondiagnostic electrocardiogram, normal initial troponin I) admitted to a non-intensive care unit monitored bed who were transported off telemetry monitor by nonclinical personnel...
October 2005: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/15666265/mandated-pain-scales-improve-frequency-of-ed-analgesic-administration
#16
Bret P Nelson, David Cohen, Owen Lander, Nicole Crawford, Asa W Viccellio, Adam J Singer
A retrospective study design was used to determine the effect of introducing a mandated verbal numeric pain scale on the incidence and timing of analgesic administration in the ED. Consecutive patients presenting with renal colic, extremity trauma, headache, ophthalmologic trauma, and soft tissue injury were included. 521 encounters were reviewed before and 479 encounters after the introduction of the pain scale. Groups were similar in baseline characteristics. Analgesic use increased from 25% to 36% (p < 0...
November 2004: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/11727689/on-line-telemetry-prospective-assessment-of-accuracy-in-an-all-volunteer-emergency-medical-service-system
#17
COMPARATIVE STUDY
J E Hollander, R Delagi, J Sciammarella, P Viccellio, J Ortiz, M C Henry
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the need for on-line telemetry control in an all-volunteer, predominantly advanced emergency medical technician (A-EMT) ambulance system. METHODS: Emergency medical service (EMS) advanced life support (ALS) providers were asked to transmit the ECG rhythms of monitored patients over a six-month period in 1993. The ECG rhythm interpretations of volunteer EMS personnel were compared with those of the on-line medical control physician. All discordant readings were reviewed by a panel of physicians to decide whether the misdiagnosis would have resulted in treatment aberrations had transmission been unavailable...
April 1995: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/11483830/a-prospective-multicenter-study-of-cervical-spine-injury-in-children
#18
MULTICENTER STUDY
P Viccellio, H Simon, B D Pressman, M N Shah, W R Mower, J R Hoffman
OBJECTIVE: Pediatric victims of blunt trauma have developmental and anatomic characteristics that can make it difficult to assess their risk of cervical spine injury (CSI). Previous reports, all retrospective in nature, have not identified any cases of CSI in either children or adults in the absence of neck pain, neurologic symptoms, distracting injury, or altered mental status. The objective of this study was to examine the incidence and spectrum of spine injury in patients who are younger than 18 years and to evaluate the efficacy of the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS) decision instrument for obtaining cervical spine radiography in pediatric trauma victims...
August 2001: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/11157297/emergency-department-overcrowding-an-action-plan
#19
EDITORIAL
P Viccellio
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2001: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/10969225/ceruminolytic-effects-of-docusate-sodium-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#20
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
A J Singer, E Sauris, A W Viccellio
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Assessment of the tympanic membrane is often impeded by the presence of cerumen. We compared the ceruminolytic effects of triethanolamine polypeptide and docusate sodium in patients with cerumen. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind trial on a convenience sample of cooperative adult and pediatric patients presenting to a university-based emergency department who required removal of cerumen to visualize the tympanic membrane...
September 2000: Annals of Emergency Medicine
keyword
keyword
45113
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"