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Case conceptualization

Xiao Yi
Biological functions - studied by molecular, systems and behavioral biology - are referred to as proximate mechanisms. Why and how they have emerged from the course of evolution are referred to as ultimate mechanisms. Despite the conceptual and technical schism between the disciplines that focus on each, studies from one side can benefit the other. Experimental evolution is an emerging field at the crossroads of functional and evolutionary biology. Herein microorganisms and mammalian cell lines evolve in well-controlled laboratory environments over multiple generations...
December 2017: Synthetic and Systems Biotechnology
Timothy W Collins, Sara E Grineski, Jayajit Chakraborty
This article outlines a conceptual model and comparatively applies it to results from environmental justice (EJ) studies of flood risk in the Miami, Florida, and Houston, Texas, metropolitan areas. In contrast to most EJ studies of air pollution, which have found that socially-vulnerable groups experience disproportionate risk, distributive EJ studies of flooding reveal inconsistent findings regarding the relationship between social vulnerability and flood exposure. Counterintuitively (from a conventional EJ perspective), some pre-flood EJ studies have found that socially-advantaged people experience the highest residential exposure to flood risks...
February 2018: Regional Environmental Change
Jack Tomlin, Peter Bartlett, Birgit Völlm
Mentally disordered offenders may be sent to secure psychiatric hospitals. These settings can resemble carceral spaces, employing high levels of security restricting resident autonomy, expression and social interaction. However, research exploring the restrictiveness of forensic settings is sparse. A systematic review was therefore undertaken to conceptualize this restrictiveness. Eight databases were searched for papers that address restrictive elements of secure forensic care in a non-cursory way. Fifty sources (empirical articles and policy documents) were included and subject to thematic analysis to identify 1) antecedent conditions to, 2) characteristic attributes, 3) consequences and 4) 'deviant' cases of the developing concept...
March 2018: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry
Simon Deeming, Penny Reeves, Shanthi Ramanathan, John Attia, Michael Nilsson, Andrew Searles
BACKGROUND: The question of how to measure, assess and optimise the returns from investment in health and medical research (HMR) is a highly policy-relevant issue. Research Impact Assessment Frameworks (RIAFs) provide a conceptual measurement framework to assess the impact from HMR. The aims of this study were (1) to elicit the views of Medical Research Institutes (MRIs) regarding objectives, definitions, methods, barriers, potential scope and attitudes towards RIAFs, and (2) to investigate whether an assessment framework should represent a retrospective reflection of research impact or a prospective approach integrated into the research process...
March 16, 2018: Health Research Policy and Systems
Zhibing Yang, Ruben Juanes
Pore fluid pressure in a fault zone can be altered by natural processes (e.g., mineral dehydration and thermal pressurization) and industrial operations involving subsurface fluid injection and extraction for the development of energy and water resources. However, the effect of pore pressure change on the stability and slip motion of a preexisting geologic fault remains poorly understood; yet, it is critical for the assessment of seismic hazard. Here, we develop a micromechanical model to investigate the effect of pore pressure on fault slip behavior...
February 2018: Physical Review. E
Joran Rolland
This paper presents a numerical and theoretical study of multistability in two stochastic models of transitional wall flows. An algorithm dedicated to the computation of rare events is adapted on these two stochastic models. The main focus is placed on a stochastic partial differential equation model proposed by Barkley. Three types of events are computed in a systematic and reproducible manner: (i) the collapse of isolated puffs and domains initially containing their steady turbulent fraction; (ii) the puff splitting; (iii) the build-up of turbulence from the laminar base flow under a noise perturbation of vanishing variance...
February 2018: Physical Review. E
Kresimir Radic, Marko Curkovic, Dario Bagaric, Maja Vilibic, Andrea Tomic, Maja Zivkovic
Patients with schizophrenia, nowadays chronic, frequently disabling mental disorder, get initial treatment after detection of a psychotic episode, seemingly late, potentially preventable stage of illness. As our knowledge about the nature of schizophrenia and other diseases of the spectrum is growing, so are the early interventions becoming more possible, and it is important to conceptualize the clinical, legal and moral issues emerging with new preventive treatments. Every intervention, especially in pre-clinical population, demands a careful risk-benefit assessment and having basic bioethical principles - primacy of patient's welfare, beneficience/non-maleficience, autonomy and justice - in mind...
March 2018: Psychiatria Danubina
A V Tereshchenko, Yu A Belyy, Yu A Sidorova, I G Trifanenkova, M S Tereshchenkova, Yu A Yudina
AIM: to develop the methodology of early primary vitrectomy for aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 10 preterm infants (20 eyes; gestational term - 26-30 weeks, post-conceptual age - 34-39 weeks) with severe forms of aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (AP-ROP). All patients underwent a complex ophthalmic examination. Their results were compared with retrospective data of earlier treated AP-ROP patients (10 preterm infants, 20 eyes), in whom laser photocoagulation (LC) was done first (gestational period at the time of LC ranged from 26 to 30 weeks, post-conceptual age - from 34 to 39 weeks)...
2018: Vestnik Oftalmologii
Sarah Ackerman
The ethical underpinnings of writing about patients are explored, the question of how best to undertake the writing of case reports being subordinated to a more general question about the ethics of choosing how or whether to write. An unsolvable paradox is encountered here: that we need to write or speak about our clinical work in order to conceptualize and understand the work we are doing, but that in the very gesture of doing so, we are breaking a fundamental bond with the patient. This conundrum is viewed from a number of vantage points...
February 2018: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association
Tristan J Coulter, Clifford J Mallett, Jefferson A Singer
The current study adopted McAdams' multilayer framework as the basis to develop a psychological portrait of an elite athlete who was identified as being particularly 'mentally tough'. The aim was to use this single case as an exemplar to demonstrate the utility of McAdams' framework for understanding the complexity of sport performers across three domains of personality: dispositional traits, characteristic adaptations, and narrative identity. We operationalised these domains through the development of specific research questions and, subsequently, the collection and integration of the participant's Big Five traits, personal strivings, coping strategies, and response to a life story interview...
January 2018: European Journal of Personality
Liliana Angelica Ponguta, Muneera Abdul Rasheed, Chin Regina Reyes, Aisha Khizar Yousafzai
The international community has set forth global targets that include calls for universal access to high-quality early childhood care and education (ECCE), as indicated in the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals. One major impediment to achieving this target is the lack of a skilled workforce. In this paper, we argue the case for leveraging youth as an untapped resource for supplying the workforce the ECCE system needs. Youth comprise a large proportion of the global population, and historically, although youth experience higher unemployment rates than their adult counterparts, youth are important agents of social awareness, social transformation, and community mobilization in multiple global contexts...
March 2018: New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development
Ahmad Khobrani, Nirali H Patel, Richard L George, Neil L McNinch, Rami A Ahmed
Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and children worldwide. Trauma education is one of the most commonly reported deficiencies in pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) training. In this study, we describe the creation of a pediatric trauma boot camp in which trainees' basic knowledge, level of confidence, teamwork, and communication skills are assessed. The primary goal of this pilot study was to create a simulation-based pediatric trauma curriculum for PEM fellows and emergency medicine residents utilizing Kern's curricular conceptual framework...
2018: Emergency Medicine International
Stephanie Stiel, Mareike Nurnus, Christoph Ostgathe, Carsten Klein
BACKGROUND: Clinical practice of Palliative Sedation (PS) varies between institutions worldwide and sometimes includes problematic practices. Little available research points at different definitions and frameworks which may contribute to uncertainty of healthcare professionals in the application of PS. This analysis investigates what demographic factors and characteristics of treatment practices differ between institutions with high versus low sedation rates estimates in Palliative and Hospice Care in Germany...
March 13, 2018: BMC Palliative Care
Sangeeta Chattoo
This paper engages critically with the global assemblage framing sickle cell and thalassaemia disorders as a 'global health crisis'; and the promise of genomics, largely DNA-based carrier/pre-conceptual screening, prenatal diagnosis with a view to terminations, deployed in framing a solution to these historically racialised spectrum of diseases as essentially preventable. Sickle cell and thalassaemia are recessively inherited, potentially life-threatening haemoglobin disorders with significant variation of severity, often needing life-long treatment...
April 2018: Anthropology & Medicine
Anna Chiumento, Laura Machin, Atif Rahman, Lucy Frith
PURPOSE: Recognising that one way to address the logistical and safety considerations of research conducted in humanitarian emergencies is to use internet communication technologies to facilitate interviews online, this article explores some practical and methodological considerations inherent to qualitative online interviewing. METHOD: Reflections from a case study of a multi-site research project conducted in post-conflict countries are presented.  Synchronous online cross-language qualitative interviews were conducted in one country...
December 2018: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being
Lisa Haushofer
In the nineteenth century, food and diet became central to a public health increasingly focused on individual behavior and on the cost of sickness. Because of its potential to impact the economic uptake of food inside individual bodies, digestion became a crucial site of physiological investigation in this context. Out of physiological research on digestion emerged a group of medicinal food products based on digestive enzymes (then referred to as digestive ferments), so-called artificially digested foods. The paper examines the creation and significance of these products, focusing on the case of Benger's Food...
February 24, 2018: Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
O Somasundaram, Ponnudurai Ratnaraj
Period of Custodial Care Only: The magnificent "Institute of Mental Health" has its history almost from 1795 when the East India company appointed Surgeon Valentine Conolly to be in charge of a "House for accommodating persons of unsound mind." After a few transitions, backed by a government order for the construction of a lunatic asylum in a 66 1/2 acre site, the asylum started functioning from 1871. The period of about six decades from its inception could be referred to as "the period of custodial care...
February 2018: Indian Journal of Psychiatry
Ariel Amir, Nathalie Q Balaban
For many decades, the wedding of quantitative data with mathematical modeling has been fruitful, leading to important biological insights. Here, we review some of the ongoing efforts to gain insights into problems in microbiology - and, in particular, cell-cycle progression and its regulation - through observation and quantitative analysis of the natural fluctuations in the system. We first illustrate this idea by reviewing a classic example in microbiology - the Luria-Delbrück experiment - and discussing how, in that case, useful information was obtained by looking beyond the mean outcome of the experiment, but instead paying attention to the variability between replicates of the experiment...
March 8, 2018: Trends in Microbiology
S D Sara Diani
Chronic diseases are defined diseases whose symptoms last for at least six months and tend to worsen over time. In Europe, they cause at least 86% of deaths. In this speculative unifying model I set a new hypothesis for the etiology of the majority of chronic diseases. The main aim is to put order and observe our organism in a systemic way, connecting pathologies we now see as disconnected phenomena, with the conceptual frameworks of complex systems and network medicine. Chronic diseases could be caused by a first unsolved acute infection...
April 2018: Medical Hypotheses
Magdalena Chechlacz
In 1909 Rezsö Bálint published an extraordinary case study of a man with complex visuospatial deficits resulting from bilateral parietal lesions. Despite some controversies over the nature of reported symptoms, in 1954 Hecaen and Ajuriaguerra conceived the term "Bálint syndrome," not only to honor Bálint's influential work but to firmly conceptualize this striking neurologic disorder. Nowadays it is largely agreed that, while Bálint syndrome may result from multiple etiologies, it is principally diagnosed based on the presence of three symptoms: simultanagnosia, optic ataxia, and ocular apraxia...
2018: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
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