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oxygen wheeze

C Gonçalves, G Wandalsen, F Lanza, A L Goulart, D Solé, A Dos Santos
BACKGROUND: Prevalence of allergic diseases and impaired pulmonary function may be high in children born prematurely. This study aimed to assess pulmonary function and prevalence of asthma, atopic diseases and allergic sensitisation in these patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted with children aged 6-14 years who were born prematurely with birth weight <2000g from January 2008 to May 2011. Exclusion criteria were: major malformations, or acute respiratory disorders...
October 15, 2016: Allergologia et Immunopathologia
Masayuki Akashi
Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that is rapid in onset and might cause death. Although wheezes, dyspnea or loss of consciousness are known to occur with severe allergic reactions with IgE-mediated food allergy, reports of apnea attack associated with IgE-mediated food allergy are rare. In this case, 9-year-old boy with IgE-mediated wheat allergy experienced apnea attack with strong desaturation after an immediate allergic reaction including erythema, abdominal pain, vomiting, and anaphylactic shock...
August 2016: Arerugī, [Allergy]
Koichiro Nandate, Bryan B Voelzke
Indigo carmine (also known as 5,5'-indigodisulfonic acid sodium salt or indigotine) is a blue dye that is administered intravenously to examine the urinary tract and usually is biologically safe and inert. Indigo carmine rarely may cause adverse reactions. We treated a 66-year-old man who had general anesthesia and radical retropubic prostatectomy for prostate cancer. He had a previous history of allergy to bee sting with nausea, vomiting, and dizziness. Within 1 minute after injection of indigo carmine for evaluation of the ureters, the patient developed hypotension to 40 mmHg, severe hypoxia (the value of SpO2 (peripheral capillary oxygen saturation) was 75% on 40% inspired oxygen concentration), poor air movement and bilateral diffuse wheezing on auscultation, and marked subcutaneous erythema at the upper extremities...
2016: Case Reports in Urology
KarryAnne K Belanger, Bill T Ameredes, Istvan Boldogh, Leopoldo Aguilera-Aguirre
Asthma is characterized by reversible airway narrowing, shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, and other symptoms driven by chronic inflammatory processes, commonly triggered by allergens. In 90% of asthmatics, most of these symptoms can also be triggered by intense physical activities and severely exacerbated by environmental factors. This condition is known as exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Current theories explaining EIA pathogenesis involve osmotic and/or thermal alterations in the airways caused by changes in respiratory airflow during exercise...
2016: Mediators of Inflammation
Seyed Hesamedin Nabavizadeh, Nazanin Farahbakhsh, Ali Fazel, Fereshteh Mosavat, Amir Anushiravani
Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways related to the obstruction of reversible airflow. Asthma presents as recurrent attacks of cough and dyspnea. Poor control causes recurrent admissions to the ICU, and mortality is related to poor drug compliance and follow-up. Angina pectoris is a syndrome of recurrent chest discomfort related to myocardial ischemia. The presence of these two disorders rarely has been reported. We reported a 12-year-old boy who was referred with exacerbation of asthma and developed angina pectoris during hospitalization...
June 2016: Electronic Physician
Francine M Ducharme, Roger Zemek, Bhupendrasinh F Chauhan, Jocelyn Gravel, Dominic Chalut, Naveen Poonai, Marie-Claude Guertin, Caroline Quach, Lucie Blondeau, Sophie Laberge
BACKGROUND: The management of paediatric asthma exacerbations is based on trials in children of all ages. Recent studies from 2009 raised the possibility that preschoolers (younger than 6 years) with viral-induced wheezing and children exposed to tobacco smoke might be at an increased risk of treatment failure. The study objective was to identify factors associated with management failure in children presenting to the emergency department with moderate or severe asthma exacerbations. METHODS: We undertook a prospective, multicentre cohort study of children aged 1-17 years presenting to five emergency departments with moderate or severe asthma (defined as a Pediatric Respiratory Assessment Measure [PRAM] of 4 to 12)...
July 20, 2016: Lancet Respiratory Medicine
I Abdulhamid, M Tremblay, J Stenger, V Tutag Lehr
AIM: We hypothesised that chloral hydrate is safe and effective for sedation during dental treatments for children with mild asthma. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of chloral hydrate by measuring changes in heart rate (HR), transcutaneous oxygen saturation, (SpO2), asthma score, behaviour, types and frequency of adverse reactions associated with chloral hydrate were assessed throughout treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Children (<10 years old) with mild asthma undergoing dental treatments received a single 65 mg/kg oral dose of chloral hydrate liquid 1 hour prior to treatment in an open label trial...
June 2016: European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry: Official Journal of European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry
H J Zar, S A Madhi, D A White, R Masekela, S Risenga, H Lewis, C Feldman, B Morrow, P Jeena
Management of acute viral bronchiolitis is largely supportive. There is currently no proven effective therapy other than oxygen for hypoxic children. The evidence indicates that there is no routine benefit from inhaled, rapid short-acting bronchodilators, adrenaline or ipratropium bromide for children with acute viral bronchiolitis. Likewise, there is no demonstrated benefit from routine use of inhaled or oral corticosteroids, inhaled hypertonic saline nebulisation, montelukast or antibiotics. The last should be reserved for children with severe disease, when bacterial co-infection is suspected...
April 2016: South African Medical Journal, Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif Vir Geneeskunde
D A White, H J Zar, S A Madhi, P Jeena, B Morrow, R Masekela, S Risenga, R Green
Bronchiolitis may be diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms. In a young child, the diagnosis can be made on the clinical pattern of wheezing and hyperinflation. Clinical symptoms and signs typically start with an upper respiratory prodrome, including rhinorrhoea, low-grade fever, cough and poor feeding, followed 1 - 2 days later by tachypnoea, hyperinflation and wheeze as a consequence of airway inflammation and air trapping.The illness is generally self limiting, but may become more severe and include signs such as grunting, nasal flaring, subcostal chest wall retractions and hypoxaemia...
April 2016: South African Medical Journal, Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif Vir Geneeskunde
Suzanne Schuh, Judy Sweeney, Stephen B Freedman, Allan L Coates, David W Johnson, Graham Thompson, Jocelyn Gravel, Francine M Ducharme, Roger Zemek, Amy C Plint, Darcy Beer, Terry Klassen, Sarah Curtis, Karen Black, Darcy Nicksy, Andrew R Willan
BACKGROUND: Up to 30 % of children with acute asthma are refractory to initial therapy, and 84 % of this subpopulation needs hospitalization. Finding safe, noninvasive, and effective strategies to treat this high-risk group would substantially decrease hospitalizations, healthcare costs, and the psycho-social burden of the disease. Whereas intravenous magnesium (Mg) is effective in severe refractory asthma, its use is sporadic due to safety concerns, with the main treatment goal being to prevent intensive care unit admission...
May 24, 2016: Trials
Luca Moresco, Maria Grazia Calevo, Federica Baldi, Amnon Cohen, Matteo Bruschettini
BACKGROUND: Transient tachypnea of the newborn is characterized by tachypnea and signs of respiratory distress. Transient tachypnea typically appears within the first two hours of life in term and late preterm newborns. Although transient tachypnea of the newborn is usually a self limited condition, it is associated with wheezing syndromes in late childhood. The rationale for the use of epinephrine (adrenaline) for transient tachypnea of the newborn is based on studies showing that β-agonists can accelerate the rate of alveolar fluid clearance...
2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Luca Moresco, Matteo Bruschettini, Amnon Cohen, Alberto Gaiero, Maria Grazia Calevo
BACKGROUND: Transient tachypnea of the newborn is characterized by tachypnea and signs of respiratory distress. Transient tachypnea typically appears within the first two hours of life in term and late preterm newborns. Although transient tachypnea of the newborn is usually a self limited condition, it is associated with wheezing syndromes in late childhood. The rationale for the use of salbutamol (albuterol) for transient tachypnea of the newborn is based on studies showing that β-agonists can accelerate the rate of alveolar fluid clearance...
2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Niki Mitselou, Gunilla Hedlin, Carl-Axel Hederos
OBJECTIVE: To compare administration of bronchodilators by nebulizers with delivery by metered dose inhalers (MDIs) with spacers and to evaluate the clinical effect of the treatment of acute asthma in preschool children. METHODS: A prospective randomized clinical trial in a pediatric emergency department (PED). Preschool children who were admitted for virus induced wheezing or acute asthma exacerbation were randomly allocated to receive bronchodilator treatment by nebulizer or by metered dose inhaler...
December 2016: Journal of Asthma: Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma
Gregoire Benoist, Mostafa Mokhtari, Antoine Deschildre, Naziha Khen-Dunlop, Laurent Storme, Alexandra Benachi, Christophe Delacourt
RATIONALE: Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with a high incidence of respiratory problems, even after initial hospital discharge. These problems are likely to lead to re-hospitalization during infancy, although actual frequency of readmissions is unknown. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the rate of hospitalization for wheezing in infants with CDH between the time of initial discharge and 24 months of age, and to identify factors associated with readmission...
2016: PloS One
Simon B Drysdale, Christopher A Green, Charles J Sande
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is ubiquitous with almost all infants having been infected by 2 years of age and lifelong repeated infections common. It is the second largest cause of mortality, after malaria, in infants outside the neonatal period and causes up to 200,000 deaths per year worldwide. RSV results in clinical syndromes that include upper respiratory tract infections, otitis media, bronchiolitis (up to 80% of cases) and lower respiratory tract disease including pneumonia and exacerbations of asthma or viral-induced wheeze...
April 2016: Therapeutic Advances in Infectious Disease
Elif C Cingi, David S Beebe, Chester B Whitley, Kumar G Belani
BACKGROUND: Patients with mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are generally considered high risk for anesthesia care, owing to disease-related factors. Sanfilippo syndrome type A (MPS IIIA) is the most frequently occurring MPS. Anesthesia-specific information for MPS IIIA is not readily available in the literature. OBJECTIVES: To report post hoc analyses on anesthesia care and outcomes from a 2-year study of the natural history of patients with untreated MPS IIIA (NCT01047306)...
May 2016: Paediatric Anaesthesia
Fatimah S Dawood, Alicia M Fry, Doli Goswami, Amina Sharmeen, Kamrun Nahar, Bilkis Ara Anjali, Mustafizur Rahman, W Abdullah Brooks
BACKGROUND: Early childhood wheezing substantially impacts quality of life in high-income countries, but data are sparse on early childhood wheezing in low-income countries. We estimate wheezing incidence, describe wheezing phenotypes, and explore the contribution of respiratory viral illnesses among children aged <5 years in urban Bangladesh. METHODS: During 2004-2010, respiratory illness surveillance was conducted through weekly home visits. Children with fever or respiratory illness were referred for examination by study physicians including lung auscultation...
June 2016: Pediatric Pulmonology
Silvana Schreiber, Luca Ronfani, Sergio Ghirardo, Federico Minen, Andrea Taddio, Mohamad Jaber, Elisa Rizzello, Egidio Barbi
AIM: Published guidelines do not recommend nasal irrigation in bronchiolitis, but it is common practice in Italy, despite a lack of data on its benefits or adverse effects. This single-blind, multicentre, randomised controlled trial compared nasal irrigation using either isotonic 0.9% sodium chloride or hypertonic 3% sodium chloride with simple supportive care in infants with bronchiolitis. METHODS: We randomly assigned 133 infants up one year of age, who were admitted to the emergency department with bronchiolitis and an oxygen saturation (SpO2) of between 88 and 94%, to the isotonic (n = 47), hypertonic (n = 44) or standard care (n = 42) groups...
March 2016: Acta Paediatrica
Melissa M Hawley, Lynelle R Johnson, Eric G Johnson, Peter J Pascoe, Brian G Murphy
CASE DESCRIPTION: A 1.5-year-old spayed female Bernese Mountain Dog was examined for a 6-month history of intermittent vomiting, regurgitation, wheezing, and coughing. Initially, a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease with secondary aspiration pneumonitis was made but clinical signs did not resolve with treatment. CLINICAL FINDINGS: Thoracic and cervical radiography and CT revealed a sessile, irregularly marginated soft tissue opacity at the level of the fourth rib...
December 1, 2015: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Ika Trisnawati, Eko Budiono, Sumardi, Andang Setiadi
Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis is fibrotic lung diseases of the pulmonary parenchyma following chronic inhalation of inorganic dusts containing crystalline silicon dioxide. The acute manifestations observed after heavy ashfalls include attacks of asthma and bronchitis, with an increased reporting of cough, breathlessness, chest tightness, and wheezing due to irritation of the lining of the airways. The chronic health condition of most concern is silicosis, a diffuse nodular fibrosis of the lungs, develops slowly, usually appearing 10 to 30 years after first exposure...
July 2015: Acta Medica Indonesiana
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