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Bacteria brain

Yuko Arita, Michael Kirk, Neha Gupta, Ramkumar Menon, Darios Getahun, Morgan R Peltier
OBJECTIVE: Tributyltin (TBT) is a persistent pollutant but its effects on placental function are poorly understood as are its possible interactions with infection. We hypothesized that TBT alters the production of sex hormones and biomarkers for inflammation and neurodevelopment in an infection-dependent manner. METHODS: Placental explant cultures were treated with 0-5000 nM TBT in the presence and absence of Escherichia coli. A conditioned medium was harvested and concentrations of steroids (progesterone, P4; testosterone, T and estradiol, E2) as well as biomarkers of inflammation [interleukin (IL)-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), IL-10, IL-6, soluble glycoprotein 130 (sgp-130) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)], oxidative stress [8-iso-prostaglandin (8-IsoP)] and neurodevelopment [brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)] were quantified...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Perinatal Medicine
Verity A Jackson, Dimphna H Meijer, Maria Carrasquero, Laura S van Bezouwen, Edward D Lowe, Colin Kleanthous, Bert J C Janssen, Elena Seiradake
Teneurins are ancient cell-cell adhesion receptors that are vital for brain development and synapse organisation. They originated in early metazoan evolution through a horizontal gene transfer event when a bacterial YD-repeat toxin fused to a eukaryotic receptor. We present X-ray crystallography and cryo-EM structures of two Teneurins, revealing a ~200 kDa extracellular super-fold in which eight sub-domains form an intricate structure centred on a spiralling YD-repeat shell. An alternatively spliced loop, which is implicated in homophilic Teneurin interaction and specificity, is exposed and thus poised for interaction...
March 14, 2018: Nature Communications
Maria M Buckley, Dervla O'Malley
Background and Objectives: Bidirectional signaling between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain is vital for maintaining whole-body homeostasis. Moreover, emerging evidence implicates vagal afferent signaling in the modulation of host physiology by microbes, which are most abundant in the colon. This study aims to optimize and advance dissection and recording techniques to facilitate real-time recordings of afferent neural signals originating in the distal colon. New Protocol: This paper describes a dissection technique, which facilitates extracellular electrophysiological recordings from visceral pelvic, spinal and vagal afferent neurons in response to stimulation of the distal colon...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Karl-Heinz Deeg
Prenatal, neonatal meningoencephalitis and infections of the brain in older infants are often associated with serious complications which can be diagnosed by sonography through the open fontanelles. Most frequently postmeningitic hydrocephalus and subdural effusions occur. Rarer complications are brain abscesses and ventriculitis which are caused by gram negative bacteria such as E. coli, Serratia marcescens, Proteus and Enterobacter. A serious complication after ventriculitis is the development of compartment hydrocephalus...
March 13, 2018: Ultraschall in der Medizin
Naoki Sawada, Takenori Kotani, Tasuku Konno, Jajar Setiawan, Yuka Nishigaito, Yasuyuki Saito, Yoji Murata, Ken-Ichi Nibu, Takashi Matozaki
In the mouse olfactory bulb (OB), interneurons such as granule cells and periglomerular cells are continuously replaced by adult-born neurons, which are generated in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the brain. We have now investigated the role of commensal bacteria in regulation of such neuronal cell turnover in the adult mouse brain. Administration of mixture of antibiotics to specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice markedly attenuated the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) into the SVZ cells. The treatment with antibiotics also reduced newly generated BrdU-positive neurons in the mouse OB...
March 9, 2018: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Kan Gao, Yu Pi, Chun-Long Mu, Yu Peng, Zan Huang, Wei-Yun Zhu
The evidence of gut microbiota-mediated modulation of brain function has been widely recognized from studies using germ-free rodents or animals with oral antibiotic-induced microbiota depletion. Since the number of bacteria in the large intestine greatly exceeds that found within the small intestine, large intestinal microbiota may play a crucial role in the modulation of brain function. In the present study, twelve piglets (12.08 ± 0.28 kg) fitted with a T-cannula at the distal ileum were fed a standard diet and randomly assigned to two groups (n=6) for ileal infusion of either saline (control group) or antibiotics (antibiotic group)...
March 10, 2018: Journal of Neurochemistry
Raphaël Enaud, Louise-Eva Vandenborght, Noémie Coron, Thomas Bazin, Renaud Prevel, Thierry Schaeverbeke, Patrick Berger, Michael Fayon, Thierry Lamireau, Laurence Delhaes
In recent years, the gut microbiota has been considered as a full-fledged actor of the gut-brain axis, making it possible to take a new step in understanding the pathophysiology of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. However, most of the studies have been devoted to gut bacterial microbiota, forgetting the non-negligible fungal flora. In this review, we expose how the role of the fungal component in the microbiota-gut-brain axis is legitimate, through its interactions with both the host, especially with the immune system, and the gut bacteria...
March 9, 2018: Microorganisms
Kingsley O Abode-Iyamah, Hsiu-Yin Chiang, Royce W Woodroffe, Brian Park, Francis J Jareczek, Yasunori Nagahama, Nolan Winslow, Loreen A Herwaldt, Jeremy D W Greenlee
OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation is an effective surgical treatment for managing some neurological and psychiatric disorders. Infection related to the deep brain stimulator (DBS) hardware causes significant morbidity: hardware explantation may be required; initial disease symptoms such as tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia may recur; and the medication requirements for adequate disease management may increase. These morbidities are of particular concern given that published DBS-related infection rates have been as high as 23%...
March 9, 2018: Journal of Neurosurgery
Hua Qi, Baosheng Li, Heling Wang, Qing Cai, Xu Quan, Yunxia Cui, Weiyan Meng
BACKGROUND: When presented with a surface or an interface, bacteria often grow as biofilms in which cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Biofilm formation on implants is an initiating factor for their failure. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the primary etiologic bacteria of initiation and progression of periodontal disease. This microorganism is also the risk factor of many systemic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and pulmonary infection. To date, no medication that can remove such biofilm has been accepted for clinical use...
March 2018: Journal of Periodontology
Manju Ohri, Smriti Parashar, Venkatesh S Pai, Sujata Ghosh, Anuradha Chakraborti
Group B streptococcus (GBS) or Streptococcus agalactiae, is an opportunistic pathogen causing a wide range of infections like pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis in newborn, pregnant women and adults. While this bacterium has adapted well to asymptomatic colonization of adult humans, it still remains a potentially devastating pathogen to susceptible infants. Advances in molecular techniques and refinement of in vitro and in vivo model systems have elucidated key elements of the pathogenic process, from initial attachment to the maternal vaginal epithelium to penetration of the newborn blood-brain barrier...
March 8, 2018: World Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology
Xinhua Zhan, Boryana Stamova, Frank R Sharp
This review proposes that lipopolysaccharide (LPS, found in the wall of all Gram-negative bacteria) could play a role in causing sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). This is based in part upon recent studies showing that: Gram-negative E. coli bacteria can form extracellular amyloid; bacterial-encoded 16S rRNA is present in all human brains with over 70% being Gram-negative bacteria; ultrastructural analyses have shown microbes in erythrocytes of AD patients; blood LPS levels in AD patients are 3-fold the levels in control; LPS combined with focal cerebral ischemia and hypoxia produced amyloid-like plaques and myelin injury in adult rat cortex...
2018: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Fatemeh Askarian, John D Lapek, Mitesh Dongre, Chih-Ming Tsai, Monika Kumaraswamy, Armin Kousha, J Andrés Valderrama, Judith A Ludviksen, Jorunn P Cavanagh, Satoshi Uchiyama, Tom E Mollnes, David J Gonzalez, Sun N Wai, Victor Nizet, Mona Johannessen
Staphylococcus aureus produces membrane-derived vesicles (MVs), which share functional properties to outer membrane vesicles. Atomic force microscopy revealed that S. aureus -derived MVs are associated with the bacterial surface or released into the surrounding environment depending on bacterial growth conditions. By using a comparative proteomic approach, a total of 131 and 617 proteins were identified in MVs isolated from S. aureus grown in Luria-Bertani and brain-heart infusion broth, respectively. Purified S...
2018: Frontiers in Microbiology
Vera Spatenkova, Ondrej Bradac, Daniela Fackova, Zdenka Bohunova, Petr Suchomel
BACKGROUND: Nosocomial infection (NI) control is an important issue in neurocritical care due to secondary brain damage and the increased morbidity and mortality of primary acute neurocritical care patients. The primary aim of this study was to determine incidence of nosocomial infections and multidrug-resistant bacteria and seek predictors of nosocomial infections in a preventive multimodal nosocomial infection protocol in the neurointensive care unit (NICU). The secondary aim focused on their impact on stay, mortality and cost in the NICU...
March 7, 2018: BMC Neurology
Christopher R Hackley, Esteban O Mazzoni, Justin Blau
Genetically encoded fluorescent sensors enable cell-specific measurements of ions and small molecules in real time. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is one of the most important signaling molecules in virtually all cell types and organisms. We describe cAMPr, a new single-wavelength cAMP sensor. We developed cAMPr in bacteria and embryonic stem cells and validated the sensor in mammalian neurons in vitro and in Drosophila circadian pacemaker neurons in intact brains. Comparison with other single-wavelength cAMP sensors showed that cAMPr improved the quantitative detection of cAMP abundance...
March 6, 2018: Science Signaling
Maya L Gosztyla, Holly M Brothers, Stephen R Robinson
The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide has long been considered to be the driving force behind Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, clinical trials that have successfully reduced Aβ burden in the brain have not slowed the cognitive decline, and in some instances, have resulted in adverse outcomes. While these results can be interpreted in different ways, a more nuanced picture of Aβ is emerging that takes into account the facts that the peptide is evolutionarily conserved and is present throughout life in cognitively normal individuals...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Bruno Zanotti, Nicola Zingaretti, Angela Verlicchi, Alex Alfieri, Pier Camillo Parodi
When a cranioplasty implant becomes infected, standard operating procedure dictates its removal and the initiation of a long course of antibiotic therapy. However, removing such a prosthesis can have a series of adverse consequences, including delayed cognitive and motor recovery, lack of brain tissue protection, unsightly deformity, and the need for two additional surgical procedures, not to mention the additional costs involved. To maintain the advantages of cranioplasty, we opted for a conservative approach (levofloxacin and rifampicin every 24 hours for 8 weeks) in a 68-year-old woman whose custom-made porous hydroxyapatite implant, fitted following aneurysm clipping, had become infected...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Heui Seung Lee, Jeong Hoon Kim, Young-Hoon Kim, Seungjoo Lee
Community-acquired brain abscess is still encountered in clinical practice and causes considerable complications, despite improvements in hygiene in modernised societies. This study aimed to identify potential risk factors pertaining to predisposing infections and microorganisms to facilitate effective treatment of the brain abscess.Of 121 surgically treated patients with brain abscess the most frequent predisposing condition was odontogenic infections (49/121 patients, 40.5%) followed by sinusitis (14/121, 11...
February 28, 2018: Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases
Kai G Kahl, Tillmann Krüger, Gabriel Eckermann, Heiner Wedemeyer
Depression and liver disease are closely associated. Every third patient with liver cirrhosis or hepatitis shows depressive symptoms. On the other hand, every third patient with depressive disorder develops an alcohol disorder at some point during his / her life. A crucial link between depression and hepatic disease seems to be inflammatory processes in which the microbiome and increased intestinal permeability of the intestine play a pivotal role. Depression as well as liver disease, alcohol consumption, stress, and aging processes disturb the delicate balance of intestinal microbiota resulting in increased intestinal permeability...
February 28, 2018: Fortschritte der Neurologie-Psychiatrie
Andrea Mancini, Francesca Campagna, Piero Amodio, Kieran M Tuohy
Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a debilitating neuropsychiatric condition often associated with acute liver failure or cirrhosis. Advanced liver diseases are characterized by a leaky gut and systemic inflammation. There is strong evidence that the pathogenesis of HE is linked to a dysbiotic gut microbiota and to harmful microbial by-products, such as ammonia, indoles, oxindoles and endotoxins. Increased concentrations of these toxic metabolites together with the inability of the diseased liver to clear such products is thought to play an important patho-ethiological role...
February 27, 2018: Food & Function
A David Smith, Martin J Warren, Helga Refsum
The biosynthesis of B12 , involving up to 30 different enzyme-mediated steps, only occurs in bacteria. Thus, most eukaryotes require an external source of B12 , and yet the vitamin appears to have only two functions in eukaryotes: as a cofactor for the enzymes methionine synthase and methylmalonylCoA mutase. These two functions are crucial for normal health in humans, and in particular, the formation of methionine is essential for providing methyl groups for over 100 methylation processes. Interference with the methionine synthase reaction not only depletes the body of methyl groups but also leads to the accumulation of homocysteine, a risk factor for many diseases...
2018: Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
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