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Neurovascular coupling

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28090802/functional-deficits-induced-by-cortical-microinfarcts
#1
Philipp M Summers, David A Hartmann, Edward S Hui, Xingju Nie, Rachael L Deardorff, Emilie T McKinnon, Joseph A Helpern, Jens H Jensen, Andy Y Shih
Clinical studies have revealed a strong link between increased burden of cerebral microinfarcts and risk for cognitive impairment. Since the sum of tissue damage incurred by microinfarcts is a miniscule percentage of total brain volume, we hypothesized that microinfarcts disrupt brain function beyond the injury site visible to histological or radiological examination. We tested this idea using a mouse model of microinfarcts, where single penetrating vessels that supply mouse cortex were occluded by targeted photothrombosis...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089656/how-do-antidepressants-influence-the-bold-signal-in-the-developing-brain
#2
REVIEW
Julia J Harris, Clare Reynell
Depression is a highly prevalent life-threatening disorder, with its first onset commonly occurring during adolescence. Adolescent depression is increasingly being treated with antidepressants, such as fluoxetine. The use of medication during this sensitive period of physiological and cognitive brain development produces neurobiological changes, some of which may outlast the course of treatment. In this review, we look at how antidepressant treatment in adolescence is likely to alter neurovascular coupling and brain energy use and how these changes, in turn, affect our ability to identify neuronal activity changes between participant groups...
December 21, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28069927/impact-of-altered-cholinergic-tones-on-the-neurovascular-coupling-response-to-whisker-stimulation
#3
Clotilde Lecrux, Claire H Sandoe, Sujaya Neupane, Pascal Kropf, Xavier Toussay, Xin-Kang Tong, María Lacalle-Aurioles, Amir Shmuel, Edith Hamel
Brain imaging techniques that use vascular signals to map changes in neuronal activity rely on the coupling between electrophysiology and hemodynamics, a phenomenon referred to "neurovascular coupling" (NVC). It is unknown whether this relationship remains reliable under altered brain states associated to acetylcholine (ACh) levels, such as attention and arousal, and in pathological conditions like Alzheimer's disease. We therefore assessed the effects of varying ACh tone on whisker evoked-NVC responses in rat barrel cortex, measured by cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neurophysiological recordings (local field potentials, LFPs)...
January 9, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28057519/col4a1-mutation-generates-vascular-abnormalities-correlated-with-neuronal-damage-in-a-mouse-model-of-hanac-syndrome
#4
Alix Trouillet, Henri Lorach, Elisabeth Dubus, Brahim El Mathari, Ivana Ivkovic, Julie Dégardin, Manuel Simonutti, Michel Paques, Xavier Guillonneau, Florian Sennlaub, José-Alain Sahel, Pierre Ronco, Emmanuelle Plaisier, Serge Picaud
: The HANAC syndrome is caused by mutations in the gene coding for collagen4a1, a major component of blood vessel basement membranes. Ocular symptoms include an increase in blood vessel tortuosity and occasional hemorrhages. To examine how vascular defects can affect neuronal function, we analyzed the retinal phenotype of a HANAC mouse model. Heterozygous mutant mice displayed both a thinning of the basement membrane in retinal blood vessels and in Bruch's membrane resulting in vascular leakage...
January 3, 2017: Neurobiology of Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28050345/functional-mri-vs-navigated-tms-to-optimize-m1-seed-volume-delineation-for-dti-tractography-a-prospective-study-in-patients-with-brain-tumours-adjacent-to-the-corticospinal-tract
#5
Carolin Weiss Lucas, Irada Tursunova, Volker Neuschmelting, Charlotte Nettekoven, Ana-Maria Oros-Peusquens, Gabriele Stoffels, Andrea Maria Faymonville, Shah N Jon, Karl Josef Langen, Hannah Lockau, Roland Goldbrunner, Christian Grefkes
BACKGROUND: DTI-based tractography is an increasingly important tool for planning brain surgery in patients suffering from brain tumours. However, there is an ongoing debate which tracking approaches yield the most valid results. Especially the use of functional localizer data such as navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) seem to improve fibre tracking data in conditions where anatomical landmarks are less informative due to tumour-induced distortions of the gyral anatomy...
2017: NeuroImage: Clinical
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28046297/su-f-e-21-change-in-retinal-arteriole-diameter-with-visual-simulation
#6
N Tellapragada, S Burns
PURPOSE: Neural activity and blood flow in the brain are tightly coupled. This coupling allows the brain to respond to periods of increased neural activity with increased blood flow. This coupling is known as neurovascular coupling. Many vascular based imaging techniques such as Functional MRI scans provide maps of signals of brain activity but they are limited by the resolution of fMRI to a few mm. The fMRI signal is indirect because the scanner is not tracking the neural activity directly but are measuring the changes in the blood oxygen levels...
June 2016: Medical Physics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28039950/ageing-causes-prominent-neurovascular-dysfunction-associated-with-loss-of-astrocytic-contacts-and-gliosis
#7
Jessica Duncombe, Ross J Lennen, Maurits A Jansen, Ian Marshall, Joanna M Wardlaw, Karen Horsburgh
AIMS: Normal neurovascular coupling, mediated by the fine interplay and communication of cells within the neurovascular unit, is critical for maintaining normal brain activity and cognitive function. This study investigated whether, with advancing age there is disruption of neurovascular coupling and specific cellular components of the neurovascular unit, and whether the effects of increasing amyloid (a key feature of Alzheimer's disease) would exacerbate these changes. METHODS: Wild-type mice, in which amyloid deposition is absent, were compared to transgenic APP littermates (TgSwDI) which develop age-dependent increases in amyloid...
December 31, 2016: Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28039371/granular-layer-neurons-control-cerebellar-neurovascular-coupling-through-an-nmda-receptor-no-dependent-system
#8
Lisa Mapelli, Giuseppe Gagliano, Teresa Soda, Umberto Laforenza, Francesco Moccia, Egidio D'Angelo
: Neurovascular coupling (NVC) is the process whereby neuronal activity controls blood vessel diameter. In the cerebellum, the molecular layer is regarded as the main NVC determinant. However, the granular layer is a region with variable metabolic demand caused by large activity fluctuations, that shows a prominent expression of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and is therefore much more suitable for effective NVC. Here we show that, in the granular layer of acute rat cerebellar slices, capillary diameter rapidly changes following mossy fiber stimulation...
December 30, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28038898/demographic-and-systemic-hemodynamic-influences-in-mechanisms-of-cerebrovascular-regulation-in-healthy-adults
#9
João Madureira, Pedro Castro, Elsa Azevedo
OBJECTIVES: A competent cerebrovascular regulation maintains an adequate cerebral blood flow by 3 major mechanisms: cerebral autoregulation (CA), vasomotor reactivity (VMR), namely to CO2, and neurovascular coupling (NVC). However, most studies generalize their results based on a response to a single parameter. Using a full battery of neurovascular stress tests, our study aims to evaluate the relationships among grades of CA, VMR, and NVC, and how their interplay is influenced by demographic and systemic hemodynamic factors...
December 27, 2016: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases: the Official Journal of National Stroke Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28017922/noise-and-non-neuronal-contributions-to-the-bold-signal-applications-to-and-insights-from-animal-studies
#10
Shella D Keilholz, Wen-Ju Pan, Jacob Billings, Maysam Nezafati, Sadia Shakil
The BOLD signal reflects hemodynamic events within the brain, which in turn are driven by metabolic changes and neural activity. However, the link between BOLD changes and neural activity is indirect and can be influenced by a number of non-neuronal processes. Motion and physiological cycles have long been known to affect the BOLD signal and are present in both humans and animal models. Differences in physiological baseline can also contribute to intra- and inter-subject variability. The use of anesthesia, common in animal studies, alters neural activity, vascular tone, and neurovascular coupling...
December 22, 2016: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27998779/systemic-blood-pressure-alters-cortical-blood-flow-and-neurovascular-coupling-during-nociceptive-processing-in-the-primary-somatosensory-cortex-of-the-rat
#11
Sae Uchida, Suzie Bois, Jean-Paul Guillemot, Hugues Leblond, Mathieu Piché
Inference on nociceptive and pain-related processes from functional magnetic resonance imaging is made with the assumption that the coupling of neuronal activity and cerebral hemodynamic changes is stable. However, since nociceptive stimulation is associated with increases in systemic arterial pressure, it is essential to determine whether this coupling remains the same during different levels of nociception and pain. The main objective of the present study was to compare the amplitude of local field potentials (LFP) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the primary somatosensory cortex during nociceptive electrical stimulation of the contralateral or ipsilateral forepaw in isoflurane-anesthetized rats, while manipulating mean arterial pressure (MAP)...
December 18, 2016: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27998205/2015-parapan-american-games-autonomic-function-but-not-physical-activity-is-associated-with-vascular-cognitive-impairment-in-spinal-cord-injury
#12
Aaron A Phillips, Jordan W Squair, Katharine Dianne Currie, Shieak Tzeng, Phil Ainslie, Andrei V Krassioukov
Autonomic dysfunction and diminished capacity for physical exercise are commonly implicated in the 3-4 fold increased risk of cerebrovascular disease after spinal cord injury (SCI). We assessed cerebrovascular function [transcranial Doppler; neurovascular coupling (NVC) and cerebral pressure-flow regulation] in elite national level wheelchair rugby players (n=23), normally active SCI individuals (n=12), and able-bodied controls (n=13). Cognitive (Stroop) and autonomic function (postural change) was also evaluated...
December 21, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27995220/standardized-4-step-technique-of-bladder-neck-dissection-during-robot-assisted-radical-prostatectomy
#13
REVIEW
Mansour Alnazari, Marc Zanaty, Emad Rajih, Assaad El-Hakim, Kevin C Zorn
Bladder neck (BN) dissection is considered one of the most challenging steps during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Better understanding of the BN anatomy, coupled with a standardized approach may facilitate dissection while minimizing complications. We describe in this article the 4 anatomic spaces during standardized BN dissection, as well other technical maneuvers of managing difficult scenarios including treatment of a large median lobe or patients with previous transurethral resection of the prostate...
December 2016: Investigative and Clinical Urology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27981581/dissecting-neurovascular-coupling-mechanisms-a-role-for-adenosine-a2a-receptor-an-editorial-highlight-for-correlation-of-transient-adenosine-release-and-oxygen-changes-in-the-caudate-putamen
#14
EDITORIAL
Nicholas Dale, Ana Maria Sebastião
Read the highlighted article 'Correlation of transient adenosine release and oxygen changes in the caudate-putamen' on page 13.
January 2017: Journal of Neurochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974609/resting-state-hemodynamics-are-spatiotemporally-coupled-to-synchronized-and-symmetric-neural-activity-in-excitatory-neurons
#15
Ying Ma, Mohammed A Shaik, Mariel G Kozberg, Sharon H Kim, Jacob P Portes, Dmitriy Timerman, Elizabeth M C Hillman
Brain hemodynamics serve as a proxy for neural activity in a range of noninvasive neuroimaging techniques including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In resting-state fMRI, hemodynamic fluctuations have been found to exhibit patterns of bilateral synchrony, with correlated regions inferred to have functional connectivity. However, the relationship between resting-state hemodynamics and underlying neural activity has not been well established, making the neural underpinnings of functional connectivity networks unclear...
December 27, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27957319/blood-brain-barrier-and-intestinal-epithelial-barrier-alterations-in-autism-spectrum-disorders
#16
Maria Fiorentino, Anna Sapone, Stefania Senger, Stephanie S Camhi, Sarah M Kadzielski, Timothy M Buie, Deanna L Kelly, Nicola Cascella, Alessio Fasano
BACKGROUND: Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex conditions whose pathogenesis may be attributed to gene-environment interactions. There are no definitive mechanisms explaining how environmental triggers can lead to ASD although the involvement of inflammation and immunity has been suggested. Inappropriate antigen trafficking through an impaired intestinal barrier, followed by passage of these antigens or immune-activated complexes through a permissive blood-brain barrier (BBB), can be part of the chain of events leading to these disorders...
2016: Molecular Autism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908788/time-to-wake-up-studying-neurovascular-coupling-and-brain-wide-circuit-function-in-the-un-anesthetized-animal
#17
REVIEW
Yu-Rong Gao, Yuncong Ma, Qingguang Zhang, Aaron T Winder, Zhifeng Liang, Lilith Antinori, Patrick J Drew, Nanyin Zhang
Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has allowed the noninvasive study of task-based and resting-state brain dynamics in humans by inferring neural activity from blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal changes. An accurate interpretation of the hemodynamic changes that underlie fMRI signals depends on the understanding of the quantitative relationship between changes in neural activity and changes in cerebral blood flow, oxygenation and volume. While there has been extensive study of neurovascular coupling in anesthetized animal models, anesthesia causes large disruptions of brain metabolism, neural responsiveness and cardiovascular function...
November 28, 2016: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27903813/abnormal-neurovascular-coupling-during-status-epilepticus-migrainosus-in-sturge-weber-syndrome
#18
Moksh Sethi, Magdalena A Kowalczyk, Linda J Dalic, John S Archer, Graeme D Jackson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 10, 2017: Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27900344/neurovascular-coupling-develops-alongside-neural-circuits-in-the-postnatal-brain
#19
COMMENT
Mariel G Kozberg, Elizabeth M C Hillman
In the adult brain, increases in local neural activity are accompanied by increases in regional blood flow. This relationship between neural activity and hemodynamics is termed neurovascular coupling and provides the blood flow-dependent contrast detected in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Neurovascular coupling is commonly assumed to be consistent and reliable from birth; however, numerous studies have demonstrated markedly different hemodynamics in the early postnatal brain. Our recent study in J...
2016: Neurogenesis (Austin, Tex.)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27891612/neurovascular-mechanisms-underlying-augmented-cold-induced-reflex-cutaneous-vasoconstriction-in-human-hypertension
#20
Jody L Greaney, W Larry Kenney, Lacy M Alexander
Despite ample evidence of dysregulated sympathetic control of the peripheral vasculature in hypertension, no studies have examined integrated neurovascular function during cold stress in hypertensive adults (HTN). We hypothesized that (1) whole-body cooling would elicit greater cutaneous vasoconstriction and greater increases in skin sympathetic nervous system activity (SSNA) in HTN (n = 14; 56 ± 2 yrs) compared to age-matched normotensive adults (NTN; n = 14; 55 ± 2 yrs) and (2) augmented reflex vasoconstriction in HTN would be mediated by an increase in cutaneous vascular adrenergic sensitivity and a greater contribution of non-adrenergic sympathetic co-transmitters...
November 28, 2016: Journal of Physiology
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