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Asad Zaman Khan, Aslam Khan, Arshad Naseem
OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety of percutaneous tracheostomy when performed by physician intensivists. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Adult Medical ICU in the Department of Critical Care Medicine, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from September 2013 to August 2016. METHODOLOGY: Departmental record for percutaneous tracheostomies, performed by physician intensivifts, was evaluated...
March 2018: Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons—Pakistan: JCPSP
Donna L Seger, Justin K Loden
CONTEXT: Following clonidine ingestion, naloxone is seldom administered as it is considered ineffective in reversing somnolence, bradycardia, or hypotension. However, this conclusion has been based on administration of small doses (2 mg or less) of naloxone. The somnolence is frequently treated with endotracheal intubation (ETI), a procedure with significant morbidity. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine if naloxone administration reversed the effects of clonidine or caused any adverse effects...
March 16, 2018: Clinical Toxicology
Ohad Ronen, Alexander Gurevich, Shimon Ivry, Edward Altman, Evgeni Kukuev
We describe a modified technique for percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy using a 15F tube exchanger or Eschmann catheter. A retrospective review of 1180 procedures using this modified technique demonstrated it to be effective with a failure rate of only 0.25% (3 patients). Moreover, it provides an additional safeguard with the ability to rapidly reintroduce the endotracheal tube into the trachea guided by the exchange catheter in the event of accidental extubation during the procedure. This technique needs no additional special devices or equipment (eg, a bronchoscope)...
March 14, 2018: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Rafael Arboleda Salazar, Jane Heggie, Piotr Wolski, Eric Horlick, Mark Osten, Massimiliano Meineri
BACKGROUND: Twenty percent of patients born with congenital heart disease present with right ventricular outflow tract abnormalities. These patients require multiple surgical procedures in their lifetime. Transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement (TPVR) has become a viable alternative to conventional pulmonary valve and right ventricular outflow tract surgery in pediatric and adult populations. In this retrospective review, we analyze the perioperative management of adult patients who underwent TPVR in our center...
March 14, 2018: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Ramón E Ruiz-Curiel, Ydaly Bonilla H, Alberto Baptista, Manuel Bronstein
OBJECTIVES: propofol is a rapid acting hypnotic that is becoming the drug of choice for sedation in digestive endoscopy worldwide. There is some controversy with regard to the use of propofol by physicians who are not anesthesiologists. We present our experience of the administration of propofol by endoscopist and nursing personnel. METHODS: this was a retrospective study of sedation in endoscopy. Propofol was exclusively used and administered by the endoscopist who performed the procedure and the nursing staff...
March 15, 2018: Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas
Mosarrat J Qureshi, Manoj Kumar
BACKGROUND: Providing effective positive pressure ventilation is considered to be the single most important component of successful neonatal resuscitation. Ventilation is frequently initiated manually with bag and face mask (BMV) followed by endotracheal intubation if respiratory depression continues. These techniques may be difficult to perform successfully resulting in prolonged resuscitation or neonatal asphyxia. The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) may achieve initial ventilation and successful resuscitation faster than a bag-mask device or endotracheal intubation...
March 15, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Jung-Rern Jiang, Shiao-Yu Yen, Pei-Fu Chiang, Hsiao-Chien Liu
PURPOSE: This study analyzed the clinical factors with the aim to determine the relationship between endotracheal tube (ETT) size and leakage ventilation (LV) and tracheal dilatation. METHODS: All patients with ETT intubation and ventilator support for more than 6 months were retrospectively evaluated. The inner tracheal diameter (TD) was measured over image at the starting and 6 months after ventilator initiated. We compared the clinical factors, outcomes and complications between patients with and without LV, as well as with and without a TD enlarging more than 25% after 6 months (TDn)...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Anesthesia
Fernando González-Magaña, Héctor Omar Malagón-Hidalgo, Eugenio García-Cano, Roberto Vilchis-López, Adriana Fentanes-Vera, Fernan-Alejandra Ayala-Ugalde
Objectives: Airway management in patients with panfacial trauma is complicated. In addition to involving facial lesions, such trauma compromises the airway, and the use of intermaxillary fixation makes it difficult to secure ventilation by usual approaches (nasotracheal or endotracheal intubation). Submental airway derivation is an alternative to tracheostomy and nasotracheal intubation, allowing a permeable airway with minimal complications in complex patients. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive, retrospective study based on a review of medical records of all patients with facial trauma from January 2003 to May 2015...
February 2018: Journal of the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
Megan B Blackburn, Maj Michael D April, Cpt Derek J Brown, Robert A DeLorenzo, Kathy L Ryan, August N Blackburn, Maj Steven G Schauer
BACKGROUND: Airway management is of critical importance in combat trauma patients. Airway compromise is the second leading cause of potentially survivable death on the battlefield and accounts for approximately 1 in 10 preventable deaths. Reports from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars indicate 4-7% incidence of airway interventions on casualties transported to combat hospitals. The goal of this study was to describe airway management in the prehospital combat setting and document airway devices used on the battlefield...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Heather Campbell, Rathinaswamy B Govindan, Srinivas Kota, Tareq Al-Shargabi, Marina Metzler, Nickie Andescavage, Taeun Chang, Gilbert Vezina, Adre du Plessis, An N Massaro
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and evidence of autonomic dysfunction have aberrant physiological responses to care events that could contribute to evolving brain injury. STUDY DESIGN: Continuous tracings of heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), cerebral near infrared spectroscopy, and video electroencephalogram data were recorded from newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy who were treated with hypothermia...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
Abhishek Biswas, Hiren J Mehta, Michael A Jantz
A 62-year-old Hispanic woman, a resident of Puerto Rico, presented with symptoms of chronic cough and shortness of breath for the past 2 years that were slowly and progressively getting worse. She received a diagnosis of asthma on the basis of her history of symptomatic "wheezing" and had been on treatment with inhaled bronchodilators and corticosteroids with minimal symptomatic improvement. The peculiarity of her symptoms was that her dyspnea was worse when she was reclining in bed and she would often hear a "whistling" noise in her throat during those times...
March 2018: Chest
Prabin Sharma, Rodrigo Aguilar, Mark Abi Nader, Shaheryar Siddiqui, Ramkaji Baniya, Sanjeeb Sudarshan Bhandari, Carmen Elena Cervantes, Ricardo Correa, Amir Masoud
OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the difference in overall outcomes between weekend admissions for acute pancreatitis (AP) and weekday admissions. METHODS: Between 2005 and 2012, data were extracted from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample on adult patients with AP. Exclusion criteria were applied for chronic pancreatitis and other pancreatic and biliary malignancies. In-hospital mortality, length of stay, hospitalization costs, comorbidities, complications, and intervention rates were compared between the weekend and weekday admissions...
April 2018: Pancreas
Huw Rf Walters, Holly E Young, Peter J Young
BACKGROUND: Unintentional extubation is a well-documented and potentially life-threatening phenomenon. There is little research into the factors that lead to unintentional extubation, and therefore how to prevent it. Endotracheal tubes (ETTs) are commonly secured with 1 cm twill tape, but there is little evidence on how to best tie them in place. We have devised a new knot for securing these tubes in place, and we have assessed its degree of slippage when exposed to both perpendicular and sliding forces in comparison with other commonly used knots...
March 6, 2018: Respiratory Care
Melissa G Y Lee, Johnny Millar, Elizabeth Rose, Aleesha Jones, Dora Wood, Taryn L Luitingh, Diana Zannino, Johann Brink, Igor E Konstantinov, Christian P Brizard, Yves d'Udekem
OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of vocal cord paresis (VCP) after neonatal aortic arch repair/Norwood-type procedure, and the effectiveness of noninvasive laryngeal ultrasound in detecting VCP compared with gold standard invasive nasoendoscopy. METHODS: Fifty-two patients who underwent an arch repair (39 of 52; 75%) or Norwood-type procedure (13 of 52; 25%) via sternotomy between April 1, 2015, and April 30, 2017 underwent laryngeal ultrasound (50 of 52; 96%) and/or flexible fiber optic nasoendoscopy (39 of 52; 75%) at 48 to 72 hours after endotracheal extubation...
February 9, 2018: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Masanori Tsukamoto, Jun Hirokawa, Takashi Hitosugi, Takeshi Yokoyama
Tracheal bronchus is an ectopic bronchus almost arising from the right side of the tracheal wall above the carina. The incidence of a tracheal bronchus is reported as 0.1 to 3%. We experienced a patient with tracheal bronchus that was incidentally found at induction of anesthesia. Endotracheal intubation in a patient with tracheal bronchus might cause obstruction of the tracheal bronchus, although in this case, ventilation was not impaired.
2018: Anesthesia Progress
C-H Wang, J Luo, J Li, J-Z Zhang, S-Y Huang, W Shao, H-S Ma
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of inhalational sevoflurane anesthesia induction on inhibiting the stress response to endotracheal intubation in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty ASA physical status I/II pediatric patients scheduled for interventricular septal defect repair or interatrial septal defect repair, were randomly divided into two groups (20 each): intravenous induction group (Group C) and inhalational sevoflurane anesthesia induction group (Group D)...
February 2018: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences
Bridgette Kram, Kylie M Weigel, Michelle Kuhrt, Daniel L Gilstrap
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the proportion of patients receiving a hospital discharge prescription for a scheduled enteral opioid following initiation as a weaning strategy from a continuous opioid infusion in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). DESIGN: Retrospective, observational study. SETTING: Five adult ICUs at a large, quaternary care academic medical center. PATIENTS: Endotracheally intubated, opioid-naive adults receiving a continuous opioid infusion with a concomitant scheduled enteral opioid initiated...
January 2018: Journal of Opioid Management
T Mencke, A Zitzmann, D A Reuter
Rapid sequence induction (RSI) is a specific technique for anesthesia induction, which is performed in patients with an increased risk for pulmonary aspiration (e.g. intestinal obstruction, severe injuries and cesarean section). The incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is very low but 10-30% of anesthesia-related deaths are caused by the consequences of ARDS. The classical RSI with its main components (i.e. head-up position, avoidance of positive pressure ventilation and administration of succinylcholine) was published nearly 50 years ago and has remained almost unchanged...
March 5, 2018: Der Anaesthesist
Khaled Dajani, Mohammed Almualim, Akshay Menon, Jacqueline Volpi-Abadie, Kierstin Lund
OBJECTIVES: Management of pediatric patients with neurological diagnoses can be challenging for anesthesiologists. We sought to determine whether preexisting neurologic disease could serve as an intrinsic risk factor for prolonged emergence. METHODS: Following institutional review board approval, we conducted a database search from 2012 to 2015. Included were patients aged 0 to 18 years undergoing ambulatory procedures, and carrying neurological diagnoses that profoundly affected their development...
March 2018: Southern Medical Journal
Stephanie Komura, Robert Rodriguez, Christopher R Peabody
BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid (TXA) is a synthetic anti-fibrinolytic agent used to prevent and treat various bleeding complications. In many studies, investigators have evaluated its utility and safety orally, intravenously, and topically, but few studies have described the potential benefits of nebulized TXA. CASE REPORT: We present a case of massive hemoptysis treated with nebulized TXA in the emergency department (ED) that led to the cessation of bleeding and avoidance of endotracheal intubation...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
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