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Sudden unexplained death

Angira Patel, Gregory Webster, Kendra Ward, John Lantos
: Aim The aim of the present study was to determine general paediatrician knowledge, practices, and attitudes towards electrocardiogram (ECG) screening in school athletes during pre-participation screening exam (PPSE). METHODS: Paediatricians affiliated with a tertiary children's hospital completed a survey about ECGs for PPSE. RESULTS: In total, 205/498 (41%) responded; 92% of the paediatricians did not include an ECG as part of PPSE; 56% were aware of a case in which a student athlete in their own community had died of sudden unexplained death; 4% had an athlete in their practice die...
October 10, 2016: Cardiology in the Young
Giulia Ottaviani
Crib death, or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), is the most frequent form of death in the first year of life, striking one baby in every 1,700-2,000. Yet, despite advances in maternal-infant care, sudden intrauterine unexplained/unexpected death syndrome (SIUDS) has a sixfold to eightfold greater incidence than that of SIDS. Frequent congenital abnormalities, likely morphological substrates for SIDS-SIUDS, were detected, mainly represented by alterations of the cardiac conduction system, such as accessory pathways and abnormal resorptive degeneration, and hypoplasia/agenesis of the vital brainstem structures...
2016: Frontiers in Pediatrics
Liyong Zhang, David J Tester, Di Lang, Yili Chen, Jinxiang Zheng, Rui Gao, Robert F Corliss, Shuangbo Tang, John W Kyle, Chao Liu, Michael J Ackerman, Jonathan C Makielski, Jianding Cheng
OBJECTIVE: To look for previously unrecognized cardiac structural abnormalities and address the genetic cause for sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS). METHODS: Data for 148 SUNDS victims and 444 controls (matched 1:3 on sex, race, and age of death within 1 year) were collected from Sun Yat-sen University from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2014, to search morphological changes. An additional 17 patients with Brugada syndrome (BrS) collected from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2014, served as a comparative disease cohort...
October 1, 2016: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Brande Brown, Levon Agdere, Cornelia Muntean, Karen David
BACKGROUND Allgrove syndrome, or triple "A" syndrome (3A syndrome), is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome with variable phenotype, and an estimated prevalence of 1 per 1,000,000 individuals. Patients usually display the triad of achalasia, alacrima, and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) insensitive adrenal insufficiency, though the presentation is inconsistent. CASE REPORT Here, the authors report a case of Allgrove syndrome in a pediatric patient with delayed diagnosis in order to raise awareness of this potentially fatal disease as a differential diagnosis of alacrima...
October 4, 2016: American Journal of Case Reports
Kimberly G Harmon, Irfan M Asif, Joseph J Maleszewski, David S Owens, Jordan M Prutkin, Jack C Salerno, Monica L Zigman, Rachel Ellenbogen, Ashwin L Rao, Michael J Ackerman, Jonathan A Drezner
OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and etiology of sudden cardiac arrest and death (SCA/D) in US high school athletes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective media database of SCA/D was queried for cases aged 14 to 18 years from 7 states over 6 school years (September 1, 2007, to August 30, 2013). Event details were investigated to determine participation on a high school athletic team, sex, sport, and occurrence during school-sponsored activity or exertion. National sports participation numbers were used and a conversion factor was applied to account for multisport athletes...
September 28, 2016: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Yanushi D Wijeyeratne, Elijah R Behr
Approximately 4% of sudden cardiac deaths are unexplained [the sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS)], and up to 6-10% of survivors of cardiac arrest do not have an identifiable cardiac abnormality after comprehensive clinical evaluation [idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF)]. Genetic testing may be able to play a role in diagnostics and can be targeted to an underlying phenotype present in family members following clinical evaluation. Alternatively, post-mortem genetic testing (the "molecular autopsy") may diagnose the underlying cause if a clearly pathogenic rare variant is found...
August 31, 2016: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine
Christian Steinberg, Zachary W M Laksman, Andrew D Krahn
Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is still among the leading causes of death in women and men, accounting for over 50% of all fatal cardiovascular events in the United States. Two arrhythmia mechanisms of SCD can be distinguished as follows: shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia) and non-shockable rhythms including asystole or pulseless electrical activity. The overall prognosis of cardiac arrest due to shockable rhythms is significantly better. While the majority of SCDs is attributed to coronary artery disease or other structural heart disease, no obvious cause can be identified in 5% of all events, and those events are labeled as sudden unexplained deaths (SUD)...
November 2016: Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine
Sofie Lindgren Christiansen, Christin Løth Hertz, Laura Ferrero-Miliani, Morten Dahl, Peter Ejvin Weeke, LuCamp, Gyda Lolk Ottesen, Rune Frank-Hansen, Henning Bundgaard, Niels Morling
In forensic medicine, one-third of the sudden deaths remain unexplained after medico-legal autopsy. A major proportion of these sudden unexplained deaths (SUD) are considered to be caused by inherited cardiac diseases. Sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be the first manifestation of these diseases. The purpose of this study was to explore the yield of next-generation sequencing of genes associated with SCD in a cohort of SUD victims. We investigated 100 genes associated with cardiac diseases in 61 young (1-50 years) SUD cases...
September 21, 2016: European Journal of Human Genetics: EJHG
Christian Steinberg, Gareth J Padfield, Jean Champagne, Shubhayan Sanatani, Paul Angaran, Jason G Andrade, Jason D Roberts, Jeffrey S Healey, Vijay S Chauhan, David H Birnie, Mikyla Janzen, Brenda Gerull, George J Klein, Richard Leather, Christopher S Simpson, Colette Seifer, Mario Talajic, Martin Gardner, Andrew D Krahn
BACKGROUND: Unexplained cardiac arrest (UCA) may be explained by inherited arrhythmia syndromes. The Cardiac Arrest Survivors With Preserved Ejection Fraction Registry prospectively assessed first-degree relatives of UCA or sudden unexplained death victims to screen for cardiac abnormalities. METHODS AND RESULTS: Around 398 first-degree family members (186 UCA, 212 sudden unexplained death victims' relatives; mean age, 44±17 years) underwent extensive cardiac workup, including ECG, signal averaged ECG, exercise testing, cardiac imaging, Holter-monitoring, and selective provocative drug testing with epinephrine or procainamide...
September 2016: Circulation. Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology
Robin L Haynes, Rebecca D Folkerth, David S Paterson, Kevin G Broadbelt, S Dan Zaharie, Richard H Hewlett, Johan J Dempers, Elsie Burger, Shabbir Wadee, Pawel Schubert, Colleen Wright, Mary Ann Sens, Laura Nelsen, Bradley B Randall, Hoa Tran, Elaine Geldenhuys, Amy J Elliott, Hein J Odendaal, Hannah C Kinney
The Safe Passage Study is an international, prospective study of approximately 12 000 pregnancies to determine the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) upon stillbirth and the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). A key objective of the study is to elucidate adverse effects of PAE upon binding to serotonin (5-HT) 1A receptors in brainstem homeostatic networks postulated to be abnormal in unexplained stillbirth and/or SIDS. We undertook a feasibility assessment of 5-HT1A receptor binding using autoradiography in the medulla oblongata (6 nuclei in 27 cases)...
September 15, 2016: Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
Luca Roncati, Veronica Termopoli, Teresa Pusiol
The endocrine disruptors (EDs) are able to influence the endocrine system, mimicking or antagonizing hormonal molecules. They are bio-persistent for their degradation resistance in the environment. Our research group has investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) the EDs presence in 35 brain samples, coming from 27 cases of sudden intrauterine unexplained death syndrome (SIUDS) and 8 cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), collected by centralization in the last year (2015). More in detail, a mixture of 25 EDs has been subjected to analytical procedure, following standard protocols...
2016: Frontiers in Neurology
Hannah C Kinney, Annapurna H Poduri, Jane B Cryan, Robin L Haynes, Lisa Teot, Lynn A Sleeper, Ingrid A Holm, Gerald T Berry, Sanjay P Prabhu, Simon K Warfield, Catherine Brownstein, Harry S Abram, Michael Kruer, Walter L Kemp, Beata Hargitai, Joanne Gastrang, Othon J Mena, Elisabeth A Haas, Roya Dastjerdi, Dawna D Armstrong, Richard D Goldstein
Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sudden unexplained death in childhood (SUDC) are defined as sudden death in a child remaining unexplained despite autopsy and death scene investigation. They are distinguished from each other by age criteria, i.e. with SIDS under 1 year and SUDC over 1 year. Our separate studies of SIDS and SUDC provide evidence of shared hippocampal abnormalities, specifically focal dentate bilamination, a lesion classically associated with temporal lobe epilepsy, across the 2 groups...
September 9, 2016: Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
Shuoyan An, Chaomei Fan, Lirong Yan, Chi Cai, Yinjian Yang, Shanshan Zhai, Shihua Zhao, Yanling Liu, Fujian Duan, Zhimin Wang, Yishi Li
OBJECTIVES: As reported, diagnostic age, gender and presence of outflow tract obstruction have an impact on prognosis in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The aim of this study was to compare the long-term outcome between apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (ApHCM) and asymmetric septal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (ASHCM) after the exclusion of these factors. METHODS: A total of 540 patients (270 with ApHCM and 270 with ASHCM) identified in a consecutive single-center cohort were retrospectively studied...
September 6, 2016: Cardiology
Eija Gaily, Markus Lommi, Risto Lapatto, Anna-Elina Lehesjoki
OBJECTIVE: Population-based studies on infantile epilepsy syndromes are scarce. Our aim was to provide syndrome-specific data on the incidence and outcome of epilepsy in a population-based cohort of infants with epilepsy onset in the first year. METHODS: Included were all infants born in 1997 through 2006 whose epileptic seizures started before 12 months of age and who were residents of the Helsinki University Hospital district at the time of seizure onset. Patients were ascertained from hospital statistics, and all patient charts were reviewed...
October 2016: Epilepsia
Carla A Houkamau, Kathrine Clarke
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: New Zealand Medical Journal
Anne Guimier, Christopher T Gordon, François Godard, Gianina Ravenscroft, Myriam Oufadem, Christelle Vasnier, Caroline Rambaud, Patrick Nitschke, Christine Bole-Feysot, Cécile Masson, Stéphane Dauger, Cheryl Longman, Nigel G Laing, Béatrice Kugener, Damien Bonnet, Patrice Bouvagnet, Sylvie Di Filippo, Vincent Probst, Richard Redon, Philippe Charron, Agnès Rötig, Stanislas Lyonnet, Alain Dautant, Loïc de Pontual, Jean-Paul di Rago, Agnès Delahodde, Jeanne Amiel
Sudden unexpected death in infancy occurs in apparently healthy infants and remains largely unexplained despite thorough investigation. The vast majority of cases are sporadic. Here we report seven individuals from three families affected by sudden and unexpected cardiac arrest between 4 and 20 months of age. Whole-exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous missense mutations in PPA2 in affected infants of each family. PPA2 encodes the mitochondrial pyrophosphatase, which hydrolyzes inorganic pyrophosphate into two phosphates...
September 1, 2016: American Journal of Human Genetics
Gary Tse, Jie M Yeo, Yin Wah Chan, Eric T H Lai Lai, Bryan P Yan
Sudden cardiac death (SCD) remains an unsolved problem in the twenty-first century. It is often due to rapid onset, ventricular arrhythmias caused by a number of different clinical conditions. A proportion of SCD patients have identifiable diseases such as cardiomyopathies, but for others, the causes are unknown. Viral myocarditis is becoming increasingly recognized as a contributor to unexplained mortality, and is thought to be a major cause of SCD in the first two decades of life. Myocardial inflammation, ion channel dysfunction, electrophysiological, and structural remodeling may play important roles in generating life-threatening arrhythmias...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
Bijal Vyas, Ratna D Puri, Narayanan Namboodiri, Renu Saxena, Mohan Nair, Prahlad Balakrishnan, M P Jayakrishnan, Ameya Udyavar, Ravi Kishore, Ishwar C Verma
BACKGROUND: Long QT syndromes (LQTS) are characterized by prolonged QTc interval on electrocardiogram (ECG) and manifest with syncope, seizures or sudden cardiac death. Long QT 1-3 constitute about 75% of all inherited LQTS. We classified a cohort of Indian patients for the common LQTS based on T wave morphology and triggering factors to prioritize the gene to be tested. We sought to identify the causative mutations and mutation spectrum, perform genotype-phenotype correlation and screen family members...
January 2016: Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology Journal
Iliana Tzimas, Jana-Christin Zingraf, Thomas Bajanowski, Micaela Poetsch
Drowning is one of the most frequent causes of accidental deaths worldwide, and still it remains a diagnosis of exclusion. Moreover, sudden cardiac deaths (SCD) or, if no actual cardiac alterations can be found, sudden unexplained deaths (SUD) represent a major group within mortality statistics as well. This leads to the assumption that there might be a general underlying cause for at least some cases of drowning, SCD, or SUD, for example, genetic aberrations in arrhythmia-associated genes. In the present study, blood samples of 171 corpses found in water (drowning, death after almost drowning, and unclear deaths) were analyzed in 19 known variants of the genes KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1, SCN5A, and NOS1AP by minisequencing...
November 2016: International Journal of Legal Medicine
Masaharu Hayashi, Hiroshi Sakuma
It is known that patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities (SMID) showed sudden unexplained death (SUD), in which autopsy failed to identify causes of death. Although the involvement of brainstem dysfunction is speculated, the detailed neuropathological analysis still remains to be performed. In order to clarify pathogenesis, we investigated the brainstem functions in autopsy cases of SMID showing SUD. We immunohistochemically examined expressions of tyrosine hydroxylase, tryptophan hydroxylase, substance P, methionine-enkephalin, and c-fos in the serial sections of the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata in eight SUD cases and seven controls, having neither unexplained death nor pathological changes in the brain...
2016: Frontiers in Neurology
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