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heart failure and endoplasmic reticulum

Ying-Chun Shih, Chao-Ling Chen, Yan Zhang, Rebecca L Mellor, Evelyn M Kanter, Yun Fang, Hua-Chi Wang, Chen-Ting Hung, Jing-Yi Nong, Hui-Ju Chen, Tzu-Han Lee, Yi-Shuan Tseng, Chiung-Nien Chen, Chau-Chung Wu, Shuei-Liong Lin, Kathryn A Yamada, Jeanne M Nerbonne, Kai-Chien Yang
<u>Rationale:</u> Cardiac fibrosis plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF). Excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) resulting from cardiac fibrosis impairs cardiac contractile function and increases arrhythmogenicity. Current treatment options for cardiac fibrosis, however, are limited and there is a clear need to identify novel mediators of cardiac fibrosis to facilitate the development of better therapeutics. Exploiting co-expression gene network analysis on RNA sequencing data from failing human heart, we identified thioredoxin domain containing 5 (TXNDC5), a cardiac fibroblast (CF)-enriched endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein, as a potential novel mediator of cardiac fibrosis and we completed experiments to test this hypothesis directly...
March 13, 2018: Circulation Research
Yuting Zhai, Yuanyuan Luo, Pei Wu, Dongye Li
Sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a (SERCA2a) is a target of interest in gene therapy for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). However, the results of an important clinical study, the Calcium Upregulation by Percutaneous Administration of Gene Therapy in Cardiac Disease (CUPID) trial, were controversial. Promising results were observed in the CUPID 1 trial, but the results of the CUPID 2 trial were negative. The factors that caused the controversial results remain unclear. Importantly, enrolled patients were required to have a higher plasma level of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in the CUPID 2 trial...
February 24, 2018: Journal of Medical Genetics
Gaetano Santulli, Daniel Lewis, Amedee des Georges, Andrew R Marks, Joachim Frank
Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are ubiquitous intracellular calcium (Ca2+ ) release channels required for the function of many organs including heart and skeletal muscle, synaptic transmission in the brain, pancreatic beta cell function, and vascular tone. In disease, defective function of RyRs due either to stress (hyperadrenergic and/or oxidative overload) or genetic mutations can render the channels leaky to Ca2+ and promote defective disease-causing signals as observed in heat failure, muscular dystrophy, diabetes mellitus, and neurodegerative disease...
2018: Sub-cellular Biochemistry
Guanghong Jia, Michael A Hill, James R Sowers
Heart failure and related morbidity and mortality are increasing at an alarming rate, in large part, because of increases in aging, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. The clinical outcomes associated with heart failure are considerably worse for patients with diabetes mellitus than for those without diabetes mellitus. In people with diabetes mellitus, the presence of myocardial dysfunction in the absence of overt clinical coronary artery disease, valvular disease, and other conventional cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension and dyslipidemia, has led to the descriptive terminology, diabetic cardiomyopathy...
February 16, 2018: Circulation Research
Lei Yao, Duanyang Xie, Li Geng, Dan Shi, Jian Huang, Yufei Wu, Fei Lv, Dandan Liang, Li Li, Yi Liu, Jun Li, Yi-Han Chen
BACKGROUND: Heart failure is a complex syndrome characterized by cardiac contractile impairment with high mortality. Defective intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is the central cause under this scenario and tightly links to ultrastructural rearrangements of sarcolemmal transverse tubules and the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR); however, the modulators of the SR architecture remain unknown. The SR has been thought to be a specialized endoplasmic reticulum membrane system. Receptor accessory proteins (REEPs)/DP1/Yop1p are responsible for shaping high-curvature endoplasmic reticulum tubules...
February 3, 2018: Journal of the American Heart Association
Bianca C Bernardo, Jenny Y Y Ooi, Kate L Weeks, Natalie L Patterson, Julie R McMullen
The benefits of exercise on the heart are well recognized, and clinical studies have demonstrated that exercise is an intervention that can improve cardiac function in heart failure patients. This has led to significant research into understanding the key mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced cardiac protection. Here, we summarize molecular mechanisms that regulate exercise-induced cardiac myocyte growth and proliferation. We discuss in detail the effects of exercise on other cardiac cells, organelles, and systems that have received less or little attention and require further investigation...
January 1, 2018: Physiological Reviews
Arthur C Sletten, Linda R Peterson, Jean E Schaffer
Environmental and socioeconomic changes over the past thirty years have contributed to a dramatic rise in the worldwide prevalence of obesity. Heart disease is among the most serious health risks of obesity, with increases in both atherosclerotic coronary heart disease and heart failure among obese individuals. In this review, we focus on primary myocardial alterations in obesity that include hypertrophic remodeling and diastolic dysfunction. Obesity-associated perturbations in myocardial and systemic lipid metabolism are important contributors to cardiovascular complications of obesity...
January 13, 2018: Journal of Internal Medicine
Bharathi Krishnan, Chandirasegaran Massilamany, Rakesh H Basavalingappa, Arunakumar Gangaplara, Rajkumar A Rajasekaran, Muhammad Z Afzal, Vahid Khalilzad-Sharghi, You Zhou, Jean-Jack Riethoven, Shyam S Nandi, Paras K Mishra, Raymond A Sobel, Jennifer L Strande, David Steffen, Jay Reddy
Sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA)2a, a critical regulator of calcium homeostasis, is known to be decreased in heart failure. Patients with myocarditis or dilated cardiomyopathy develop autoantibodies to SERCA2a suggesting that they may have pathogenetic significance. In this report, we describe epitope mapping analysis of SERCA2a in A/J mice that leads us to make five observations: 1) SERCA2a contains multiple T cell epitopes that induce varying degrees of myocarditis...
January 15, 2018: Journal of Immunology: Official Journal of the American Association of Immunologists
Tomofumi Misaka, Tomokazu Murakawa, Kazuhiko Nishida, Yosuke Omori, Manabu Taneike, Shigemiki Omiya, Chris Molenaar, Yoshihiro Uno, Osamu Yamaguchi, Junji Takeda, Ajay M Shah, Kinya Otsu
Protein quality control in cardiomyocytes is crucial to maintain cellular homeostasis. The accumulation of damaged organelles, such as mitochondria and misfolded proteins in the heart is associated with heart failure. During the process to identify novel mitochondria-specific autophagy (mitophagy) receptors, we found FK506-binding protein 8 (FKBP8), also known as FKBP38, shares similar structural characteristics with a yeast mitophagy receptor, autophagy-related 32 protein. However, knockdown of FKBP8 had no effect on mitophagy in HEK293 cells or H9c2 myocytes...
January 2018: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology
A Arrieta, E A Blackwood, C C Glembotski
Cardiac myocytes are the cells responsible for the robust ability of the heart to pump blood throughout the circulatory system. Cardiac myocytes grow in response to a variety of physiological and pathological conditions; this growth challenges endoplasmic reticulum-protein quality control (ER-PQC), a major feature of which includes the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER-PQC and the UPR in cardiac myocytes growing under physiological conditions, including normal development, exercise, and pregnancy, are sufficient to support hypertrophic growth of each cardiac myocyte...
October 13, 2017: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology
Chiara Mozzini, Giovanni Xotta, Ulisse Garbin, Anna Maria Fratta Pasini, Luciano Cominacini
BACKGROUND Heatstroke (HS) is a life-threatening condition characterized by an elevation of the core body temperature above 40°C, central nervous system dysfunction, and possible multi-organ failure. HS can trigger systemic inflammation, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), rhabdomyolysis, cerebral edema and seizures, pulmonary edema, heart dysfunctions, and renal and hepatic failure. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 41-year-old Romanian woman with a history of alcoholism who developed HS after arriving by bus in Verona, Italy in June 2016...
October 4, 2017: American Journal of Case Reports
Shengnan Wu, Qiulun Lu, Qilong Wang, Ye Ding, Zejun Ma, Xiaoxiang Mao, Kai Huang, Zhonglin Xie, Ming-Hui Zou
BACKGROUND: FUN14 domain containing 1 (FUNDC1) is a highly conserved outer mitochondrial membrane protein. The aim of this study is to examine whether FUNDC1 modulates the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes (MAMs), mitochondrial morphology, and function in cardiomyocytes and intact hearts. METHODS: The impacts of FUNDC1 on MAMs formation and cardiac functions were studied in mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes, in mice with cardiomyocyte-specific Fundc1 gene knockout ( Fundc1 f/Y /Cre αMyHC+/- ), and in the cardiac tissues of the patients with heart failure...
December 5, 2017: Circulation
Mohammed Shaqura, Doaa M Mohamed, Noureddin B Aboryag, Lama Bedewi, Lukas Dehe, Sascha Treskatsch, Mehdi Shakibaei, Michael Schäfer, Shaaban A Mousa
Heart failure has emerged as a disease with significant public health implications. Following progression of heart failure, heart and liver dysfunction are frequently combined in hospitalized patients leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Here, we investigated the underlying pathological alterations in liver injury following heart failure. Heart failure was induced using a modified infrarenal aortocaval fistula (ACF) in male Wistar rats. Sham operated and ACF rats were compared for their morphometric and hemodynamic data, for histopathological and ultrastructural changes in the liver as well as differences in the expression of apoptotic factors...
2017: PloS One
Marc R Reboll, Mortimer Korf-Klingebiel, Stefanie Klede, Felix Polten, Eva Brinkmann, Ines Reimann, Hans-Joachim Schönfeld, Maria Bobadilla, Jan Faix, George Kensah, Ina Gruh, Michael Klintschar, Matthias Gaestel, Hans W Niessen, Andreas Pich, Johann Bauersachs, Joseph A Gogos, Yong Wang, Kai C Wollert
BACKGROUND: Clinical trials of bone marrow cell-based therapies after acute myocardial infarction (MI) have produced mostly neutral results. Treatment with specific bone marrow cell-derived secreted proteins may provide an alternative biological approach to improving tissue repair and heart function after MI. We recently performed a bioinformatic secretome analysis in bone marrow cells from patients with acute MI and discovered a poorly characterized secreted protein, EMC10 (endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein complex subunit 10), showing activity in an angiogenic screen...
November 7, 2017: Circulation
Junyoung Hong, Kwangchan Kim, Jong-Hee Kim, Yoonjung Park
Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is highly associated with cardiovascular disease, is triggered by a disturbance in ER function because of protein misfolding or an increase in protein secretion. Prolonged disruption of ER causes ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and leads to various diseases. Eukaryotic cells respond to ER stress via three major sensors that are bound to the ER membrane: activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), inositol-requiring protein 1α (IRE1α), and protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK)...
2017: International Journal of Vascular Medicine
Mei-Yan Yang, Ya-Bin Wang, Bo Han, Bo Yang, Yu-Wei Qiang, Yan Zhang, Zhao Wang, Xu Huang, Jie Liu, Yun-Dai Chen, Jun Ren, Feng Cao, Yong Xu
Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a key mitochondrial enzyme in the metabolism of aldehydes and may have beneficial cardiovascular effects for conditions such as cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, myocardial I/R injury, reperfusion, arrhythmia, coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis. In this study we investigated the role of ALDH2 in the progression of atherosclerosis and the underlying mechanisms, with a focus on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. A clinical study was performed in 248 patients with coronary heart disease...
August 31, 2017: Acta Pharmacologica Sinica
Qing-Qing Wu, Yang Xiao, Yuan Yuan, Zhen-Guo Ma, Hai-Han Liao, Chen Liu, Jin-Xiu Zhu, Zheng Yang, Wei Deng, Qi-Zhu Tang
Cardiac remodelling is classified as physiological (in response to growth, exercise and pregnancy) or pathological (in response to inflammation, ischaemia, ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, biomechanical stress, excess neurohormonal activation and excess afterload). Physiological remodelling of the heart is characterized by a fine-tuned and orchestrated process of beneficial adaptations. Pathological cardiac remodelling is the process of structural and functional changes in the left ventricle (LV) in response to internal or external cardiovascular damage or influence by pathogenic risk factors, and is a precursor of clinical heart failure (HF)...
September 15, 2017: Clinical Science (1979-)
Brian C Jensen, Scott J Bultman, Darcy Holley, Wei Tang, Gustaaf de Ridder, Salvatore Pizzo, Dawn Bowles, Monte S Willis
The cellular environment of the mammalian heart constantly is challenged with environmental and intrinsic pathological insults, which affect the proper folding of proteins in heart failure. The effects of damaged or misfolded proteins on the cell can be profound and result in a process termed "proteotoxicity". While proteotoxicity is best known for its role in mediating the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, its role in human heart failure also has been recognized. The UPR involves three branches, including PERK, ATF6, and IRE1...
2017: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Mei Hua Gao, N Chin Lai, Dimosthenis Giamouridis, Young Chul Kim, Tracy Guo, H Kirk Hammond
OBJECTIVES: Increased expression of adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) has beneficial effects on the heart through cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent and cAMP-independent pathways. We previously generated a catalytically inactive mutant of AC6 (AC6mut) that has an attenuated response to β-adrenergic receptor stimulation, and, consequently, exhibits reduced myocardial cAMP generation. In the current study we test the hypothesis that cardiac-directed expression of AC6mut would protect the heart from sustained β-adrenergic receptor stimulation, a condition frequently encountered in patients with heart failure...
2017: PloS One
Jun Yang, Zhao Wang, Dong-Lin Chen
Shikonin, isolated from the roots of herbal plant Lithospermum erythrorhizon, is a naphthoquinone. It has been reported to exert beneficial anti-inflammatory effects and anti-oxidant properties in various diseases. Isoproterenol (ISO) has been widely used to establish cardiac injury in vivo and in vitro. However, shikonin function in ISO-induced cardiac injury remains uncertain. In our study, we attempted to investigate the efficiency and possible molecular mechanism of shikonin in cardiac injury treatment induced by ISO...
September 2017: Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, Biomédecine & Pharmacothérapie
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