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Office practice

Alison Cieslak, Gary Elkins, Tanima Banerjee, Jessica Marsack, Kimberly Hickman, Alisa Johnson, Norah Henry, Debra Barton
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine the content, feasibility, and best outcome of a mind-body intervention involving self-directed hypnotic relaxation to target body image.
. DESIGN: A five-week, uncontrolled, unblinded feasibility intervention study.
. SETTING: Behavioral therapy offices in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Waco, Texas.
. SAMPLE: 10 female breast cancer survivors and 1 breast and gynecologic cancer survivor...
November 1, 2016: Oncology Nursing Forum
Xiaoqi Li, Yong Chen, Ruosha Li
We consider recurrent events of the same type that occur during alternating restraint and non-restraint time periods. This research is motivated by a study on juvenile recidivism, where the probationers were followed for re-offenses during alternating placement periods and free-time periods. During the placement periods, the probationers were under a restricted environment with direct supervision of the probation officers. During the free-time periods, the probationers were released to home and not under direct supervision...
October 18, 2016: Statistics in Medicine
Karol Kumpfer, Catia Magalhães, Jing Xie
Family evidence-based interventions (FEBIs) are effective in creating lasting improvements and preventing children's behavioral health problems, even in genetically at-risk children. Most FEBIs, however, were designed for English-speaking families. Consequently, providers have difficulty engaging non-English-speaking populations in their own country or in other countries where the content, language, and recruitment methods of the FEBIs do not reflect their culture. The practical solution has been to culturally adapt existing FEBIs...
October 18, 2016: Prevention Science: the Official Journal of the Society for Prevention Research
Martin C S Wong, Harry H X Wang, Mandy W M Kwan, Wai Man Chan, Carmen K M Fan, Miaoyin Liang, Shannon Ts Li, Franklin D H Fung, Ming Sze Yeung, David K L Chan, Sian M Griffiths
The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has been increasing both globally and locally. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are in a privileged position to provide first contact and continuing care for diabetic patients. A territory-wide Reference Framework for Diabetes Care for Adults has been released by the Hong Kong Primary Care Office in 2010, with the aim to further enhance evidence-based and high quality care for diabetes in the primary care setting through wide adoption of the Reference Framework.A valid questionnaire survey was conducted among PCPs to evaluate the levels of, and the factors associated with, their adoption of the Reference Framework...
August 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Erin E Shaughnessy, Erika L Stalets, Samir S Shah
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review covers the outpatient management of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), discussing the changing microbiology of CAP since the introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in 2010, and providing an overview of national guideline recommendations for diagnostic evaluation and treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Rates of invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumococcal antibiotic resistance have plummeted since widespread 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine immunization...
October 15, 2016: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
Steven Steinhubl
Despite having the basic tools necessary to appropriately identify and manage individuals with hypertension for over half a century it remains the single greatest contributing risk factor to morbidity and mortality worldwide today. Since diagnosis and effective treatment availability are not issues, this major failing in care can be attributed to inadequate systems of care: systems that have led to only <20% of hypertensive individuals globally having their blood pressure adequately controlled. Even in the US, where it is one of the most common reasons for a primary care visit, and with over $42...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Daniel Ngui, Michael J H Qiu, Michael Mann
OBJECTIVE: In order to address the systematic and practice management issues associated with managing hypertension, we undertook a quality improvement project at a multi-physician clinic in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We piloted an evidence-based electronic medical record (EMR) hypertension management dashboard based on the 2014 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) guideline recommendations. Since June 1, 2015, our chronic disease coordinator utilized our EMR HTN Dashboard to generate patient recalls, create physician reminders and to enhance internal clinic referrals to provide 1:1 patient hypertension self-management education by physicians and our clinical pharmacist team...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Ran-Hui Cha, Hajeong Lee, Jung Pyo Lee, Chun Soo Lim, Yon Su Kim, Sung Gyun Kim
OBJECTIVE: Blood pressure (BP) control is the most established practice for preventing the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We examined the BP control and nocturnal dipping pattern change in hypertensive patients with CKD and its effects on target organ damages. DESIGN AND METHOD: We recruited 378 hypertensive CKD patients from 4 centers in Korea. They underwent office and ambulatory BP monitoring at the time of enrollment and 1 year after. High office and ambulatory BP was defined as > 140/90 mmHg and > 135/85 mmHg (daytime)/> 120/70 mmHg (nighttime), respectively...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Ernesto Schiffrin
Hypertension has been defined by the levels of BP above which lowering BP will reduce the cardiovascular risk associated with elevated BP. This level has been classically 140/90 mmHg on the basis of actuarial data from the insurance industry. However, we now know that cardiovascular risk rises progressively from levels as low as 115/75 mmHg upward with a doubling of the incidence of both coronary heart disease and stroke for every 20/10-mmHg increment of BP. In uncomplicated hypertension without cardiovascular risk factors or target organ damage, there is little randomized clinical trial evidence that lowering SBP of <160 mmHg reduces cardiovascular risk...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Michael Weber
: Age is the most powerful cardiovascular risk factor. Based on a meta-analysis of a million control patients in hypertension trials, the Clinical Trialists Collaboration has estimated that doubling of major cardiac and stroke events occurs with age increments of < 10 years (1). Data from the ACCOMPLISH trial, which will be presented at this ISH meeting for the first time, show that patients aged > 70 (mean: 75.2), compared with those < 70 (mean: 63.7), had a 2.82-fold greater event rate for cardiovascular death and a 2...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Chen-Huan Chen
Blood pressure (BP) is conventionally measured with a pressure cuff over an upper arm and a cutoff of 140/90 mmHg in the office is the current criteria for diagnosing hypertension. Recently, out of office BP has been suggested as the reference standard for the management of hypertension, due to its better prognostic value over office BP.However, the above BP parameters are all measured at brachial arteries and may be different from the central blood pressure (CBP) measured in the ascending aorta or carotid arteries...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Kazuomi Kario
The essential benefit of the management of hypertension is derived from the blood pressure (BP) lowering per se, indicating the importance of BP throughout 24 hours. Recent guidelines stressed the importance of home BP for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. It is well-known that cardiovascular events occur more frequently in the morning BP levels have been shown to increase during the period from night to early morning. Clinical research using ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) or home BP monitoring has clarified that morning BP and BP surge are more closely related to the cardiovascular risk than office BP (Kario et al...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Kazuomi Kario
Out-of-office blood pressure (BP) measured by home BP monitoring (HBPM) or ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) was demonstrated to be superior to office BP for the prediction of cardiovascular events. The ABPM is superior to HBPM for detecting the all the BP-related risks throughout 24-hr, and the self-measured HBPM underestimates the risk of daytime stress hypertension and nocturnal hypertension. However, ABPM cannot always be provided in clinical practice, and home BP monitoring can be superior to ABPM as part of a home BP-guided antihypertension strategy in clinical practice...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Peter C Wever, Mike B J M Korst, Maarten Otte
In December 1913, a board of medical officers was appointed to adapt new U.S. Army equipment to the needs of the Hospital Corps. One of the improvements concerned substitution of the satchel-like Hospital Corps pouch used to carry first aid equipment. A waist belt with 10 pockets, known as the medical belt, was devised, and supplied with a tourniquet, adhesive plaster, safety pins, iodine swabs, sublimated gauze, individual dressing packets, gauze bandages, aromatic spirit of ammonia, and common pins. In addition, an ax carrier accommodating a hand ax, a canteen hanger, and a pouch to carry diagnosis tags and instruments were attached to the medical belt...
October 2016: Military Medicine
Roberto Zinicola, N Cracco, A Totaro, R Dalla Valle, G Pedrazzi
PURPOSE: The assessment of bowel habit is important in the management of patients with colorectal disease. There is not an ideal and practical bowel habit scoring system. The current scores have been designed only for a subclass of patients having a particular disorder. Furthemore, they are complex and time consuming. We propose a simple score to quickly assess the bowel function in all patients with proctological disorders. METHODS: We developed a bowel habit scoring system including three parameters: bowel frequency, stool consistency, and urgency...
October 17, 2016: International Journal of Colorectal Disease
Anita Sadhu, Ryan P Calfee, Andre Guthrie, Lindley B Wall
PURPOSE: To test the null hypothesis that there is no difference in patient-reported and objective outcomes of revision ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition (LRTI) compared with primary LRTI. METHODS: This case-control investigation enrolled 10 patients who had undergone revision LRTI at a tertiary care center. All patients had previously undergone primary trapeziectomy with LRTI. Patients with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were eligible. All patients completed an in-office study evaluation...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Hand Surgery
A Spek, B Szabados, B Ziegelmüller, C Stief, M D'Anastasi, M Staehler
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the usage of different guidelines and to estimate the impact of changed recommendation in routine management, therapy and follow-up of patients with renal cell cancer (RCC). METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was sent to 600 urologists in Germany. Twenty-seven percent of them were included in the analysis. The questions were about the practice setting, surgical and medical treatment of RCC, follow-up modalities, knowledge and usage of RCC guidelines...
October 18, 2016: Urologia Internationalis
Robert F Kushner
Provision of dietary counseling in the office setting is enhanced by using team-based care and electronic tools. Effective provider-patient communication is essential for fostering behavior change: the key component of lifestyle medicine. The principles of communication and behavior change are skill-based and grounded in scientific theories and models. Motivational interviewing and shared decision making, a collaboration process between patients and their providers to reach agreement about a health decision, is an important process in counseling...
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Jeffrey D Robinson, Maria Venetis, Richard L Street, Thomas Kearney
BACKGROUND: Despite data on breast cancer patients' information needs and their association with patient outcomes, there are currently no data on what U.S. patients actually ask surgeons during primary consultations. METHODS: Working from transcripts of videotaped, treatment decision making consultations between breast cancer patients and surgeons, we identify all questions (by patients and companions) and then use grounded theory techniques to determine the most recurrent question-asking themes...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Surgical Oncology
Brandon Battis, Linda Clifford, Mostaqul Huq, Edrick Pejoro, Scott Mambourg
OBJECTIVES: Patients treated with oral chemotherapy appear to have less contact with the treating providers. As a result, safety, adherence, medication therapy monitoring, and timely follow-up may be compromised. The trend of treating cancer with oral chemotherapy agents is on the rise. However, standard clinical guidance is still lacking for prescribing, monitoring, patient education, and follow-up of patients on oral chemotherapy across the healthcare settings. The purpose of this project is to establish an oral chemotherapy monitoring clinic, to create drug and lab specific provider order sets for prescribing and lab monitoring, and ultimately to ensure safe and effective treatment of the veterans we serve...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Oncology Pharmacy Practice
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