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Stroke Guideline

Maria Celeste Buompadre, Kathleen Andres, Lee-Anne Slater, Hadi Mohseni-Bod, Anne-Marie Guerguerian, Helen Branson, Suzanne Laughlin, Derek Armstrong, Mahendranath Moharir, Gabrielle deVeber, Tilman Humpl, Osami Honjo, Shaf Keshavjee, Rebecca Ichord, Vitor Pereira, Nomazulu Dlamini
The updated American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guidelines include recommendation for thrombectomy in certain adult stroke cases. The safety and efficacy of thrombectomy in children are unknown. An 8-year-old girl experienced acute stroke symptoms on two occasions while therapeutically anticoagulated on Novalung. Computed tomography scans showed proximal vessel thrombi, which were retrieved using a Trevo device without hemorrhagic complications. Postprocedural assessment found respective decreases in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score from 10 to 4 and 12 to 7...
September 14, 2016: Pediatric Neurology
Nizal Sarrafzadegan, Mojgan Gharipour, Masoumeh Sadeghi, Pouya Nezafati, Mohammad Talaie, Shahram Oveisgharan, Fatemeh Nouri, Alireza Khosravi
BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is recently proposed as a predictor for the occurrence of vascular defects causing ischemic stroke. However, details on the association of MetS with stroke are scare in our region. The present study aimed to assess the predictive value of MetS and its components for stoke among the Iranian population. METHODS: A longitudinal population-based study was conducted on adults aged 35 years or older who were living in 3 districts in central part of Iran and followed for 10 years...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases: the Official Journal of National Stroke Association
Staci Sue Reynolds, Susan M McLennon, Patricia R Ebright, Laura L Murray, Tamilyn Bakas
RATIONALE: Program evaluation is essential to help determine the success of an evidence-based practice program and assist with translating these processes across settings. AIMS: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of 2 competency programs that sought to improve neurocritical care nurses' knowledge of and adherence to evidence-based stroke and spinal cord injury guidelines. These programs consisted of 3 specific implementation strategies, including local opinion leaders, printed educational materials, and educational outreach...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice
Michael B Boffa
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Elevated plasma concentrations of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) are an independent and causal risk factor for cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease, ischemic stroke, and calcific aortic valve stenosis. This review summarizes the rationale for Lp(a) lowering and surveys relevant clinical trial data using a variety of agents capable of lowering Lp(a). RECENT FINDINGS: Contemporary guidelines and recommendations outline populations of patients who should be screened for elevated Lp(a) and who might benefit from Lp(a) lowering...
December 2016: Current Atherosclerosis Reports
Zixiao Li, Chunjuan Wang, Xingquan Zhao, Liping Liu, Chunxue Wang, Hao Li, Haipeng Shen, Li Liang, Janet Bettger, Qing Yang, David Wang, Anxin Wang, Yuesong Pan, Yong Jiang, Xiaomeng Yang, Changqing Zhang, Gregg C Fonarow, Lee H Schwamm, Bo Hu, Eric D Peterson, Ying Xian, Yilong Wang, Yongjun Wang
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke is a leading cause of death in China. Yet the adherence to guideline-recommended ischemic stroke performance metrics in the past decade has been previously shown to be suboptimal. Since then, several nationwide stroke quality management initiatives have been conducted in China. We sought to determine whether adherence had improved since then. METHODS: Data were obtained from the 2 phases of China National Stroke Registries, which included 131 hospitals (12 173 patients with acute ischemic stroke) in China National Stroke Registries phase 1 from 2007 to 2008 versus 219 hospitals (19 604 patients) in China National Stroke Registries phase 2 from 2012 to 2013...
October 6, 2016: Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation
Sandy Middleton, Chris Levi, Simeon Dale, N Wah Cheung, Elizabeth McInnes, Julie Considine, Catherine D'Este, Dominique A Cadilhac, Jeremy Grimshaw, Richard Gerraty, Louise Craig, Verena Schadewaldt, Patrick McElduff, Mark Fitzgerald, Clare Quinn, Greg Cadigan, Sonia Denisenko, Mark Longworth, Jeanette Ward
BACKGROUND: Internationally recognised evidence-based guidelines recommend appropriate triage of patients with stroke in emergency departments (EDs), administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and proactive management of fever, hyperglycaemia and swallowing before prompt transfer to a stroke unit to maximise outcomes. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness in EDs of a theory-informed, nurse-initiated, intervention to improve multidisciplinary triage, treatment and transfer (T(3)) of patients with acute stroke to improve 90-day death and dependency...
October 18, 2016: Implementation Science: IS
Ömer Erküner, Roy Claessen, Ron Pisters, Germaine Schulmer, Roos Ramaekers, Laura Sonneveld, Elton Dudink, Theo Lankveld, Ione Limantoro, Bob Weijs, Laurent Pison, Yuri Blaauw, Cees B de Vos, Harry Jgm Crijns
BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing elective electrical cardioversion (ECV) for atrial fibrillation have a temporarily increased risk of thromboembolism. Current guidelines recommend adequate anticoagulation for ≥3 consecutive weeks precardioversion, i.e. consecutive INR values 2.0-3.0 in patients with vitamin K antagonists (VKA). We aimed to evaluate the occurrence and impact of subtherapeutic INRs precardioversion and to study factors associated with these unwanted fluctuations. METHODS: We recruited 346 consecutive patients undergoing elective ECV in the Maastricht University Medical Centre between 2008 and 2013...
October 11, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
Michael L James, Margueritte Cox, Ying Xian, Eric E Smith, Deepak L Bhatt, Phillip J Schulte, Adrian Hernandez, Gregg C Fonarow, Lee H Schwamm
BACKGROUND: Compared to ischemic stroke, sex differences in response to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are largely unexplored, and their potential interactions with patient age have not been examined. This study hypothesized that risk for poor outcome is greater in women with increasing age. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Get With The Guidelines(®)-Stroke database was used to assess differences between men and women with ICH. Data from 192,826 ICH patients admitted from January 1, 2009 through March 31, 2014 to 1,728 fully participating sites were analyzed using logistic regression to test interactions between age/sex and outcome...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Women's Health
Fares Karamat, Frederieke Diemer, Sergio Baldew, Glen Oehlers, Gert Van Montfrans, Lizzy Brewster
OBJECTIVE: The global burden of disease attributable to high blood pressure showed that 54% of stroke and 47% of ishaemic heart disease worldwide were due to hypertension. Hypertension is still the main risk factor for premature death worldwide and, in particular, in low- and middle-income countries. We aimed to assess prehypertension and hypertension prevalence among a predominantly Asian and African population living in urban Suriname, a middle-income country in South America. DESIGN AND METHOD: We used data from the Healthy Life in Suriname study, in which 1,152 men and women aged 18-70 y living in the capital were randomly selected...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Clive Rosendorff
Many guidelines for the management of hypertension have recommended that the goal of antihypertensive treatment in the elderly (usually specified as 80 years or above) should be less than 150/90 mmHg. SPRINT included subjects 50 years or above, and a substantial proportion of subjects 75 years and older. These are individuals at high risk for adverse cardiovascular events because of high prevalence of hypertension and atherosclerotic disease. The less stringent BP goals have been based on a percieved danger of lowering BP to levels that threaten vital organ pefusion (myocardium, brain, kidney)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Paul Whelton
BACKGROUND: Choice of the optimal target for blood pressure (BP) reduction during treatment of patients with hypertension, including those with underlying co-morbid conditions, is an important challenge in clinical practice. The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) was designed to provide guidance in selection of a Systolic BP target during treatment of hypertension. METHODS: Adults ≥50 years old with hypertension and at least one additional risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but excluding persons with diabetes mellitus, prior stroke, or advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) were randomly assigned to intensive therapy (intensive), targeting a systolic BP (SBP) <120 mmHg, or standard therapy (standard), targeting a SBP <140 mmHg...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Joji Ishikawa, Ayumi Toba, Yuko Yamanaka, Shintaro Watanabe, Kazumasa Harada
OBJECTIVE: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) diagnosed by Cornell product in electrocardiogram predicted future stroke events at lower thresholds in Japanese general populations than those in western countries; therefore, we thought to evaluate whether the gender-adjustment and the levels of Cornell product to detect echo LVH was appropriate in Japanese subjects. DESIGN AND METHOD: We consecutively enrolled 345 hypertensive patients who were performed echocardiography for the screening of LVH...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Jürgen Bohlender, Jürg Nussberger, Beate Bohlender
OBJECTIVE: In elderly hypertensive patients, systolic blood pressure (sBP) goals recommended by US and European guidelines (ESH) for the initiation of treatment are more liberal than in younger patients because of an increased risk of treatment-associated side-effects and hypotension. Carotid stenosis increases with age and poses a risk of brain ischemia if hypotension occurs. Its relevance for the routine care of elderly hypertensives, however, remains unclear. We analyzed data on precerebral artery morphology and BP evolution from a survey of aged hospitalized patients...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Hiroshi Itoh
Many hypertension guidelines have been published mainly from Western countries to standardize the management of hypertension all over the world, however, the significance of hypertension, along with other cardio-metabolic risks, such as obesity, diabetes or dyslipidemia should differ among different races. This paper compares the relevance of hypertension, one of the most important cardio-metabolic risk factors, in Asian and Western societies.1) Low target level of blood pressure control for diabetic hypertensives in JapanIn the Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the management of Hypertension (JSH2014), the target of blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive patients with diabetes was set as < 130/80 mmHg...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Guido Grassi
The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in the USA, allocated 9361 hypertensive patients (mean age 68 years) to two systolic blood pressure treatment targets (either < 120mmHg or < 140mmHg). Although SPRINT intended to enrol hypertensive patients at high cardiovascular risk, it specifically excluded patients with diabetes mellitus or prior stroke. SPRINT was stopped earlier than planned, after a mean follow-up of 3.26 years, on the recommendation of its data and safety monitoring board, and data were published on 9 November 2015...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Alberto Zanchetti
The question of BP targets of antihypertensive treatment has been debated in recent guidelines, and reopened by publication of SPRINT. Although interpretation of SPRINT is made difficult by a preferential effect of more intense BP lowering on heart failure rather than stroke and myocardial infarction, and by a different method of BP measurement, recent meta-analyses by my group have shown SBP reduction <130 mmHg can reduce risk of cardiovascular (CV) outcomes further, but absolute benefit is smaller than that achieved across the 140 mmHg cutoff, and treatment discontinuations for adverse events become greater...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Ernesto Schiffrin
Hypertension has been defined by the levels of BP above which lowering BP will reduce the cardiovascular risk associated with elevated BP. This level has been classically 140/90 mmHg on the basis of actuarial data from the insurance industry. However, we now know that cardiovascular risk rises progressively from levels as low as 115/75 mmHg upward with a doubling of the incidence of both coronary heart disease and stroke for every 20/10-mmHg increment of BP. In uncomplicated hypertension without cardiovascular risk factors or target organ damage, there is little randomized clinical trial evidence that lowering SBP of <160 mmHg reduces cardiovascular risk...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Enrico Agabiti Rosei
Current Hypertension Guidelines emphasize the importance of assessing the presence of preclinical organ damage. In fact, an extensive evaluation of organ damage may increase the number of patients classified at high CV risk and therefore strongly influence the clinical management of patients. Hypertensive heart disease remains to date the form of organ damage for which there is the greatest amount of evidence of a strong independent prognostic significance. In the presence of a chronic pressure overload, a parallel addition of sarcomers takes place with an increase in myocyte width, which in turn increases left ventricular wall thickness; myocyte hypertrophy is also associated with apoptosis, collagen deposition and ventricular fibrosis with an impairment of coronary hemodynamics as well, thus profoundly influencing functional properties of the left (and right) ventricle...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Hiromi Rakugi
European guidelines (ESH-ESC2013) for the elderly have discussed well about treatment blood pressure (BP) levels and targeting BP levels. In general, elderly patients with systolic BP (SBP) ≥160 mmHg including individuals older than 80 years in good physical and mental conditions are recommended reducing SBP to between 150 and 140 mmHg. Furthermore, fit elderly patients <80 years old are recommended to consider antihypertensive treatment at SBP values ≥140 mmHg with a target SBP <140 mmHg. On the other hand, frail elderly patients are recommended to leave decisions on antihypertensive therapy to the treating physician, and based on monitoring of the clinical effects of treatment...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Francesco Cappuccio
The evidence. Salt (i.e. sodium chloride) is causally related to blood pressure (BP). The higher the salt intake, the higher the BP, an effect seen since birth. A small and sustained reduction in salt intake causes a fall in BP. The evidence from controlled studies, small and large, short and long, all agree on the following: (1) salt intake is one of the major determinants of BP in populations and individuals; (2) a reduction in salt intake causes a dose-dependent reduction in BP - the lower the salt the lower the BP; (3) the effect is seen in both sexes, in people of all ages and ethnic groups, and with all starting BPs...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
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