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motoric cognitive risk

Salome Kornfeld, Martina Studer, Stephanie Winkelbeiner, Mária Regényi, Eugen Boltshauser, Maja Steinlin
AIM: Paediatric arterial ischaemic stroke can lead to reduced quality of life (QoL). It is important to identify predictors of QoL to support recovery. We examined long-term QoL after arterial ischaemic stroke concerning different variables. METHOD: Children registered in the Swiss Neuropediatric Stroke Registry and suffering from arterial ischaemic stroke between 2000 and 2008 were included. Two years post-stroke, assessments included intelligence quotient tests for cognitive impairment and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) for neurological impairment; 5 years post-stroke, the Kidscreen-27 was used for QoL, DSM-IV criteria screening was used for attention deficits, and the ABILHAND-Kids was used for manual motor skills...
October 21, 2016: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Sanath Allampati, Kevin D Mullen
Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE) is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with decompensated liver disease. The spectrum of disease ranges from trivial abnormalities in complex decision making and prolonged reaction time to coma in its most severe form1. The very initial stages, recently termed covert Hepatic Encephalopathy (CHE), can only be diagnosed with the help of neuropsychiatric testing while the later and more severe forms, termed overt Hepatic Encephalopathy (OHE), can be diagnosed clinically. Severity of HE is graded based on West Haven Criteria and please refer to table 1 for more details2...
October 20, 2016: Minerva Gastroenterologica e Dietologica
Anne Synnes, Thuy Mai Luu, Diane Moddemann, Paige Church, David Lee, Michael Vincer, Marilyn Ballantyne, Annette Majnemer, Dianne Creighton, Junmin Yang, Reginald Sauve, Saroj Saigal, Prakesh Shah, Shoo K Lee
OBJECTIVES: Identify determinants of neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm children. METHODS: Prospective national cohort study of children born between 2009 and 2011 at <29 weeks gestational age, admitted to one of 28 Canadian neonatal intensive care units and assessed at a Canadian Neonatal Follow-up Network site at 21 months corrected age for cerebral palsy (CP), visual, hearing and developmental status using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-Third Edition (Bayley-III)...
October 6, 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
Victor E Ezeugwu, Neera Garga, Patricia J Manns
PURPOSE: Understanding the determinants of sedentary behaviour (sitting or lying with low energy expenditure) in stroke survivors can enhance the development of successful behaviour change strategies. This qualitative study explored the perceptions of stroke survivors about sedentary behaviour and ways in which it can be changed. METHODS: An interpretative qualitative inquiry was used with thematic analysis of interview data. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured guide with 13 stroke survivors...
October 19, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
Eider M Arenaza-Urquijo, Robin de Flores, Julie Gonneaud, Miranka Wirth, Valentin Ourry, William Callewaert, Brigitte Landeau, Stéphanie Egret, Florence Mézenge, Béatrice Desgranges, Gaël Chételat
Engagement in cognitive activity (CA) and physical activity (PA) during the lifespan may counteract brain atrophy later in life. Here, we investigated engagement in CA and PA during late adulthood in association with gray matter volume (GM) in normal older adults, with special focus on the hippocampus. Forty-five cognitively normal older individuals (mean age: 72) underwent T1-weighted MRI and self-reported CA and PA assessment. Whole brain voxel-wise multiple regression models were carried out to assess the relationships between CA, PA and GM volume adjusted by age and sex...
October 18, 2016: Brain Imaging and Behavior
Viktor S Kokhan, Marina I Matveeva, Azat Mukhametov, Andrey S Shtemberg
Space flight factors (SFF) significantly affect the operating activity of astronauts during deep space missions. Gravitational overloads, hypo-magnetic field and ionizing radiation are the main SFF that perturb the normal activity of the central nervous system (CNS). Acute and chronic CNS risks include alterations in cognitive abilities, reduction of motor functions and behavioural changes. Multiple experimental works have been devoted to the SFF effects on integrative functional activity of the brain; however, the model parameters utilized have not always been ideal and consistent...
October 15, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Roderick Wondergem, Martijn F Pisters, Eveline J Wouters, Nick Olthof, Rob A de Bie, Johanna M A Visser-Meily, Cindy Veenhof
BACKGROUND: Stroke is not only an acute disease, but for the majority of patients, it also becomes a chronic condition. There is a major concern about the long-term follow-up with respect to activities of daily living (ADL) in stroke survivors. Some patients seem to be at risk for decline after a first-ever stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine the course of ADL from 3 months after the first-ever stroke and onward and identify factors associated with decline in ADL. METHODS: A systematic literature search of 3 electronic databases through June 2015 was conducted...
October 18, 2016: Cerebrovascular Diseases
Basil M Jan, Mohammed M Jan
Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common chronic motor disorder with associated cognitive, communicative, and seizure disorders. Children with CP have a higher risk of dental problems creating significant morbidity that can further affect their wellbeing and negatively impact their quality of life. Screening for dental disease should be part of the initial assessment of any child with CP. The objective of this article is to present an updated overview of dental health issues in children with CP and outline important preventative and practical strategies to the management of this common comorbidity...
October 2016: Neurosciences: the Official Journal of the Pan Arab Union of Neurological Sciences
T Perez-Roche, I Altemir, G Giménez, E Prieto, I González, J L Peña-Segura, O Castillo, V Pueyo
BACKGROUND: Prematurity and low birth weight are known risk factors for cognitive and developmental impairments, and school failure. Visual perceptual and visual motor skills seem to be among the most affected cognitive domains in these children. AIMS: To assess the influence of prematurity and low birth weight in visual cognitive skills and school performance. METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study, which included 80 boys and girls in an age range from 5 to 13...
October 13, 2016: Research in Developmental Disabilities
Michelle N Servaas, Linda Geerligs, Jojanneke A Bastiaansen, Remco J Renken, Jan-Bernard C Marsman, Ilja M Nolte, Johan Ormel, André Aleman, Harriëtte Riese
Neuroticism and genetic variation in the serotonin-transporter (SLC6A4) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene are risk factors for psychopathology. Alterations in the functional integration and segregation of neural circuits have recently been found in individuals scoring higher on neuroticism. The aim of the current study was to investigate how genetic risk factors impact functional network organization and whether genetic risk factors moderate the association between neuroticism and functional network organization...
October 14, 2016: Brain Imaging and Behavior
Michał Starosta, Justyna Redlicka, Michał Brzeziański, Marta Niwald, Elżbieta Miller
Diseases of the central nervous system are the most common cause of mobility and cognitive impairment. Stroke is the leading cause of hospitalization in the Neurological Rehabilitation Departments. Age increases the risk of stroke, therefore monitoring basic medical parameters, including blood pressure especially under age of 65, is a very important part of preventive healthcare. According to data from the National Association of Stroke, in 10% of patients after brain stroke, recovery of motor functions and mental state is almost complete, in 25% impairment is minimal, in 40% the functional and cognitive disability is moderated or significant therefore requires rehabilitation, in 10% in view of impossibility of active rehabilitation patients requires comprehensive nursing care service at home or in special long term care centers...
July 29, 2016: Polski Merkuriusz Lekarski: Organ Polskiego Towarzystwa Lekarskiego
Matt S Hicks, Reginald S Sauve, Charlene M T Robertson, Ari R Joffe, Gwen Alton, Dianne Creighton, David B Ross, Ivan M Rebeyka
BACKGROUND: Developmental and language outcomes at 2 years of age of children who had arterial switch operation (ASO) for transposition of the great arteries 2004-2010 are described. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, 91/98 (93 %) children who underwent ASO were assessed at 2 years of age with the Bayley Scales of Infant & Toddler Development-3rd Edition. Outcomes were compared by patient and perioperative variables using bivariate and multivariate regression analyses to identify predictors of language delay...
2016: SpringerPlus
Onanong Jitkritsadakul, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
BACKGROUND: Physicians are usually at the forefront when the issue of driving ability is raised by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients or their family members, even though few have been formally trained in this area. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: To identify relevant literature on driving assessment tools in patients with PD by performing a systematic review on this subject in order to provide background information for physicians on what types of driving assessment are available, and to delineate the role of physicians in providing fitness to drive recommendations...
2016: Journal of Clinical Movement Disorders
Tamara Shiner, Anat Mirelman, Mali Gana Weisz, Anat Bar-Shira, Elissa Ash, Ron Cialic, Naomi Nevler, Tanya Gurevich, Noa Bregman, Avi Orr-Urtreger, Nir Giladi
Importance: Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene are a risk factor for the development of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). These mutations are common among Ashkenazi Jews (AJ) and appear to have an effect on the natural history of the disease. Objectives: To evaluate the clinical and genetic characteristics of an AJ cohort of patients diagnosed with DLB, assess the association of phenotype of DLB with GBA mutations, and explore the effects of these mutations on the clinical course of the disease...
October 10, 2016: JAMA Neurology
O A Gan'kina, E E Vasenina, O S Levin, E Yu Fedotova, S N Illarioshkin
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease. Literature sources indicate the association of PD and mutations in the glucocerebrosidase A (GBA) gene. According to our study, the frequency of the two most common mutations in the GBA gene, N370S and L444P, is 1.85%. Mutation carriers have slower progression of motor symptoms, but are more likely to develop drug-induced motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. In carriers of GBA mutations, the severity of cognitive impairment corresponds to age-matched patients without mutations...
2016: Zhurnal Nevrologii i Psikhiatrii Imeni S.S. Korsakova
Andrea Lee, Rebecca M Gilbert
Parkinson disease (PD) is a common progressive neurodegenerative condition, causing both motor and non motor symptoms. Motor symptoms include stiffness, slowness, rest tremor and poor postural reflexes, whereas nonmotor symptoms include abnormalities of mood, cognition, sleep and autonomic function. Affected patients show cell loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and accumulation of aggregated alpha-synuclein into intracellular structures called Lewy bodies, within specific brain regions. The main known non modifiable risk factor is age...
November 2016: Neurologic Clinics
Caitlin Northcutt Pope, Tyler Reed Bell, Despina Stavrinos
Performing secondary tasks, such as texting while driving, is associated with an increased risk of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs). While cognitive processes, such as executive function, are involved in driving, little is known about the relationship between executive control and willingness to engage in distracted driving. This study investigated the relationship between age, behavioral manifestations of executive function, and self-reported distracted driving behaviors. Executive difficulty (assessed with the BRIEF-A) as well as demographics (age and gender) was considered as possible predictors of engagement in distracted driving behaviors...
October 4, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Stuart J McCarter, Michael J Howell
Sleep disorders and neurodegenerative diseases are commonly encountered in primary care. A common, but underdiagnosed sleep disorder, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), is highly associated with Parkinson disease and related disorders. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is common. It is estimated to affect 0.5% of the general population and more than 7% of individuals older than 60 years; however, most cases go unrecognized. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder presents as dream enactment, often with patients thrashing, punching, and kicking while they are sleeping...
October 2016: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Crista A Hopp, Ida Sue Baron
OBJECTIVE: Children delivered at the edge of viability are at greatest risk of medical and neuropsychological disability, their adverse outcomes overshadowing extremely preterm survivors with more optimal outcomes. We aimed to describe an exceptionally early-born extremely preterm (EEEP) preschooler whose neurobiological, familial, and socioeconomic factors likely influenced her unexpected cognitive resilience. METHOD: Baby G was a 3-years 10-months-old, English-speaking, Caucasian, singleton girl born weighing 435 g at 22(5/7) weeks' gestation to well-educated married parents...
October 5, 2016: Clinical Neuropsychologist
Thomas P Schmidt, David L Pennington, Stephanie L Cardoos, Timothy C Durazzo, Dieter J Meyerhoff
INTRODUCTION: Intact neurocognition and early cognitive recovery during abstinence are important for substance use treatment outcome. Yet, little is known about them in the largest group of treatment seekers today, individuals with polysubstance use disorders (PSU). This study primarily contrasted PSU and individuals with an alcohol use disorder (AUD) on neurocognitive and inhibitory control measures and, secondarily, measured changes during abstinence in PSU. METHOD: At one month of abstinence from all substances except tobacco, 36 PSU and 69 AUD completed neurocognitive assessments of executive function, general intelligence, auditory-verbal learning/memory, visuospatial learning/memory/skills, processing speed, working memory, fine motor skills, and cognitive efficiency...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
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