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orbital fracture

Sarah M Jacobs, Colin P McInnis, Matthew Kapeles, Shu-Hong Chang
PURPOSE: Severe vision loss is a risk of orbital surgery which physicians should counsel patients about, but the overall risk rate is unknown. This research was conducted to determine the risk of severe vision loss related to orbital surgery. DESIGN: Retrospective review. PARTICIPANTS: Patients who underwent orbital surgery at either of 2 academic medical centers between January 1994 and December 2014. METHODS: A billing database search was conducted to identify all patients who had orbital surgery during the study period, cross-checked against diagnostic codes related to vision loss...
March 15, 2018: Ophthalmology
Jesper Jansen, Ruud Schreurs, Leander Dubois, Thomas J J Maal, Peter J J Gooris, Alfred G Becking
OBJECTIVE: Advanced three-dimensional (3D) diagnostics and preoperative planning are the first steps in computer-assisted surgery (CAS). They are an integral part of the workflow, and allow the surgeon to adequately assess the fracture and to perform virtual surgery to find the optimal implant position. The goal of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and predictability of 3D diagnostics and preoperative virtual planning without intraoperative navigation in orbital reconstruction. METHODS: In 10 cadaveric heads, 19 complex orbital fractures were created...
February 26, 2018: Journal of Cranio-maxillo-facial Surgery
Agata Joanna Ordon, Marcin Kozakiewicz, Michal Wilczynski, Piotr Loba
INTRODUCTION: Up to 35% of orbital floor fractures extend to the medial wall. This results in restriction of both abduction and adduction, leading to horizontal diplopia. The greater the defect, the more pronounced the enophthalmos. AIM OF THE STUDY: The aim of the study was to determine the influence of concomitant medial wall defects on enophthalmos and diplopia, and the influence of intraoperative revision on the results of surgical reconstruction in patients with orbital floor fracture...
February 3, 2018: Journal of Cranio-maxillo-facial Surgery
Marina Alexandra Gavin Clavero, María Victoria Simón Sanz, Andrea Mur Til, Úrsula María Jariod Ferrer
PURPOSE: We conducted a review of orbital fractures treated in our hospital over a period of 4 years. We reviewed several complications of such fractures, especially the relationship of postsurgical diplopia with different presurgical variables: age, gender, type of fracture, fracture area, coronal and sagittal diameter of fracture, fractured floor area, time to surgery, presence of muscle herniation, and presence of muscle entrapment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fractures involving the orbital floor remain a controversial issue in terms of surgical treatment and the time from trauma to surgery...
February 19, 2018: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Rüdiger M Zimmerer, Nils-Claudius Gellrich, Sophie von Bülow, Edward Bradley Strong, Edward Ellis, Maximilian E H Wagner, Gregorio Sanchez Aniceto, Alexander Schramm, Michael P Grant, Lim Thiam Chye, Alvaro Rivero Calle, Frank Wilde, Daniel Perez, Gido Bittermann, Nicholas R Mahoney, Marta Redondo Alamillos, Joanna Bašić, Marc Metzger, Michael Rasse, Jan Dittman, Elke Rometsch, Kathrin Espinoza, Ronny Hesse, Carl-Peter Cornelius
PURPOSE: Reconstruction of orbital wall fractures is demanding and has improved dramatically with the implementation of new technologies. True-to-original accuracy of reconstruction has been deemed essential for good clinical outcome, and reasons for unfavorable clinical outcome have been researched extensively. However, no detailed analysis on the influence of plate position and surface contour on clinical outcome has yet been published. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from a previous study were used for an ad-hoc analysis to identify predictors for unfavorable outcome, defined as diplopia or differences in globe height and/or globe projection of >2 mm...
February 1, 2018: Journal of Cranio-maxillo-facial Surgery
Camille Aubin-Lemay, Philippe Acar, Nayif Alnaif, Abdulrahman Alamri, Alain Joe Azzi, Sabrina Cugno
The authors present a rare case of nontraumatic medial orbital wall fracture in an 11-year-old girl. Fractures of the orbital wall secondary to nose blowing have not been previously described in the pediatric population. The patient reported a history of chronic forceful nose blowing, followed by periorbital swelling after an episode of vigorous nose blowing. Erroneous diagnoses of sinusitis and periorbital cellulitis lead to unnecessary antibiotic treatment. The authors hypothesize that repeated and aggressive nose blowing is analogous to stress fractures, leading to weakening and eventual fracture of the medial orbital wall...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Jianhua Yan, Yun Wen, Zhonghao Wang
PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to observe the surgical outcomes of suture globe fixation to the orbital wall for patients with complicated strabismus. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The medical records of patients with complicated strabismus who were treated at the Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China, from January 2010 to June 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Routine strabismus surgery was not possible in these cases. Eyes were anchored to the orbital wall by simple strong anastomosis of the extraocular muscle and orbital wall tissues using silk suture, which resulted in slight overcorrection of the ultimate ocular position after anchoring...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Omri Emodi, Saleh Nseir, Dekel Shilo, Hanna Srouji, Adi Rachmiel
Isolated orbital wall fractures account for 4% to 16% of all facial fractures. Even a modest change in the position of the bony walls can have a significant impact on orbital volume and globe position. Alloplastic materials or autogenous bone grafts such as the antral maxillary wall can be used to reconstruct small- to medium-size orbital fractures. The main advantage of an antral wall graft is the intraoral approach with minimal morbidity. Nine patients underwent repair of orbital floor fractures using the extraoral and the intraoral antral wall approach...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Ulrik Nikolaj Ascanius Felding
Isolated fractures of the orbital floor or medial wall are often referred to as blowout fractures (BOFs). Debilitating double vision and aesthetic deformity may affect the patients' quality of life and daily living skills, for instance, working or driving a car. The management of blowout fractures is, however, challenging, since not all fractures demand surgery. Some patients may have symptoms which subside, or may never develop symptoms. Due to a lack of evidence, there are still considerable differences in opinion on the criteria for surgery...
March 2018: Danish Medical Journal
Nigel R Johnson, Navin R Singh, Mehmet Oztel, Venkat N Vangaveti, Benjamin B Rahmel, Lakshmi Ramalingam
Our aim was to evaluate ophthalmological injuries associated with fractures of the orbitozygomaticomaxillary complex that required operative treatment, and we collected data retrospectively over a period of five years (2012-2016 inclusive). Of the 190 patients, 162 were male with a median age of 31 (IQR 25 -39) years. Assault was the most common mechanism of injury (125/190, 66%). Minor ophthalmic injuries (those unlikely to cause permanent visual disturbance) and major ophthalmic injuries (those with the potential to cause permanent visual disturbance) were recorded...
March 2, 2018: British Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery
Huijing Ye, Rongxin Chen, Xiufen Lian, Jingxia Huang, Yuxiang Mao, Rong Lu, Siming Ai, Wenfang Ma, Jingyi Lin, Huasheng Yang, Wenjun Guo
Purpose: To evaluate patient pain and discomfort following oculoplastic surgery performed under general anesthesia and to assess key factors associated with postoperative pain and discomfort. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study was conducted among 212 consecutive patients who underwent oculoplastic surgery performed under general anesthesia. The patients were assessed according to quantified levels of pain and discomfort postoperatively. Analgesic requests were recorded, and responses were statistically analyzed...
2018: Journal of Pain Research
Hyung-Joo Lee, Youn-Jung Kim, Dong-Woo Seo, Chang Hwan Sohn, Seung Mok Ryoo, Shin Ahn, Yoon-Seon Lee, Won Young Kim, Kyoung Soo Lim
OBJECTIVE: The detection of intracranial injury in patients with facial injury rather than traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a challenge for emergency physicians. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence and risk factors of intracranial injury in patients with orbital wall fracture (OWF), who were classified with a chief complaint of facial injury rather than TBI. METHODS: This retrospective case-control study enrolled adult OWF patients (age ≥18 years) who presented at the hospital between January 2004 and March 2016...
February 24, 2018: Injury
Ryan F Holmes, Thomas Lung, Gordian Wo Fulde, Clare L Fraser
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 5, 2018: Medical Journal of Australia
Angelica W DesPain, Jennifer Chapman, Haroon Shaukat
We describe the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented to a tertiary care emergency department after a motor vehicle accident with facial trauma and bradycardia. The patient was found to have an orbital floor fracture and inferior rectus muscle entrapment with resulting bradycardia secondary to the oculocardiac reflex. The oculocardiac reflex is an uncommon cause of bradycardia in the setting of trauma but should be considered because it can necessitate surgical intervention.
February 28, 2018: Pediatric Emergency Care
Yasuhiro Takahashi, Yoshiyuki Kitaguchi, Hirohiko Kakizaki
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 26, 2018: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Dan Zhao, Shanwei Tao, Dewei Zhang, Mengyang Qin, Yijun Bao, Anhua Wu
PURPOSE: Traumatic meningoencephalocele primarily occurs as a rare but complex complication of cranial base and orbital roof fractures. Traumatic intraorbital meningoencephalocele, which is rare and easily overlooked, can be life-threatening since cephalomeningitis occurs due to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. It is obscure for the operative indications or standard surgical methods of traumatic meningoencephaloceles since the combined intricate craniofacial and basal fractures, brain injury, and CSF leak may exist...
February 27, 2018: Brain Injury: [BI]
Todd E Thurston, Anee S Jackson, Naiman Nazir, Brian T Andrews, Danielle Crowe
INTRODUCTION: Ideally, all patients with isolated orbit fracture would undergo ophthalmologic evaluation before surgical intervention to rule out concomitant globe injury and possible vision loss. Unfortunately, not all institutions are capable of providing the evaluation before surgery. The authors hypothesize that the anatomic location of a single-wall orbit isolated orbit fracture can help predict the likelihood of ocular injury and thus identify high-risk patients who mandate ophthalmologic evaluation before surgical repair...
February 23, 2018: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Yuan Deng, Zhengkang Li
OBJECTIVE: Chemosis is a common occurrence after orbital reconstruction surgery by the transconjunctival approach. The authors propose an early tarsorrhaphy approach for treating severe conjunctival chemosis following orbital fracture repair. METHODS: All severe conjunctival chemosis patients following orbital fracture repair were divided into 2 groups: tarsorrhaphy performed immediately when the eyelids could not close completely due to prominent conjunctival edema (early tarsorrhaphy, n = 10); and tarsorrhaphy performed 3 days after the appearance of severe chemosis (delayed tarsorrhaphy, n = 10)...
February 23, 2018: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Alessandro Prior, Luca Allegretti, Ilaria Melloni, Marta Bovio, Francesco Laganà, Marco Ceraudo, Gianluigi Zona
We present a case of ophthalmic artery (OA) traumatic avulsion, leading to a post-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with ventricular blood invasion and hydrocephalus, mimicking an internal carotid aneurysm rupture. This is the third case of such an event reported in literature and the first without orbital fractures and optic nerve avulsion. Conservative treatment was sufficient for the avulsion, but surgery was needed for the coexisting eye luxation. Traumatic OA avulsion is a rare but possible event and should be suspected in case of basal cisterns SAH, evidence of orbital trauma and CT angiogram or angiographic absence of opacification of the OA...
February 14, 2018: Acta Neurochirurgica
Rasmané Béogo, Toua Antoine Coulibaly, Mariam Traoré Dolo, Ibraima Traoré, Balla Ouattara, Jean Wenceslas Diallo
INTRODUCTION: Yet uncommon, blindness is a potential associated injury of facial fractures. METHODS: Epidemiology, mechanisms, fracture types, and outcome of facial fractures-associated blindness in a 10-year period are retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Out of 907 facial fractures patients, 10 had blindness, giving a frequency of 1.1%. There were 9 men and 1 woman whom age range was 6 to 59 years (mean: 31.2 years). Intentional injury patients were significantly the most at risk of blindness (P = 0...
February 12, 2018: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
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