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Stuttering in adults

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28697606/dysphonia-in-adults-with-developmental-stuttering-a-descriptive-study
#1
Anél Botha, Elizbé Ras, Shabnam Abdoola, Jeannie Van der Linde
BACKGROUND: Persons with stuttering (PWS) often present with other co-occurring conditions. The World Health Organization's (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) proposes that it is important to understand the full burden of a health condition. A few studies have explored voice problems among PWS, and the characteristics of voices of PWS are relatively unknown. The importance of conducting future research has been emphasised. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to describe the vocal characteristics of PWS...
June 26, 2017: South African Journal of Communication Disorders. die Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif Vir Kommunikasieafwykings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28655373/the-pathogenesis-assessment-and-treatment-of-speech-fluency-disorders
#2
Katrin Neumann, Harald A Euler, Hans-Georg Bosshardt, Susanne Cook, Patricia Sandrieser, Martin Sommer
BACKGROUND: Approximately 1% of children and adolescents, 0.2% of women, and 0.8% of men suffer from stuttering, and lesser numbers from cluttering. Persistent speech fluency disorders often cause lifelong problems in communication and social participation. METHODS: In an interdisciplinary, evidence and consensus based clinical practice guideline, the current understanding of the nature, identification, diagnosis, and treatment of stuttering and cluttering was summarized...
June 5, 2017: Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28642548/hemodynamics-of-speech-production-an-fnirs-investigation-of-children-who-stutter
#3
B Walsh, F Tian, J A Tourville, M A Yücel, T Kuczek, A J Bostian
Stuttering affects nearly 1% of the population worldwide and often has life-altering negative consequences, including poorer mental health and emotional well-being, and reduced educational and employment achievements. Over two decades of neuroimaging research reveals clear anatomical and physiological differences in the speech neural networks of adults who stutter. However, there have been few neurophysiological investigations of speech production in children who stutter. Using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), we examined hemodynamic responses over neural regions integral to fluent speech production including inferior frontal gyrus, premotor cortex, and superior temporal gyrus during a picture description task...
June 22, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28614847/using-network-science-measures-to-predict-the-lexical-decision-performance-of-adults-who-stutter
#4
Nichol Castro, Kristin M Pelczarski, Michael S Vitevitch
Purpose: Methods from network science have examined various aspects of language processing. Clinical populations may also benefit from these novel analyses. Phonological and lexical factors have been examined in adults who stutter (AWS) as potential contributing factors to stuttering, although differences reported are often subtle. We reexamined the performance of AWS and adults who do not stutter (AWNS) from a previously conducted lexical decision task in an attempt to determine if network science measures would provide additional insight into the phonological network of AWS beyond traditional psycholinguistic measures...
June 15, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577876/a-preliminary-study-on-the-neural-oscillatory-characteristics-of-motor-preparation-prior-to-dysfluent-and-fluent-utterances-in-adults-who-stutter
#5
Anna Mersov, Douglas Cheyne, Cecilia Jobst, Luc De Nil
PURPOSE: Recent literature on speech production in adults who stutter (AWS) has begun to investigate the neural mechanisms characterizing speech-motor preparation prior to speech onset. Compelling evidence has suggested that stuttering is associated with atypical processing within cortical and sub-cortical motor networks, particularly in the beta frequency range, that is effective before speech production even begins. Due to low stuttering frequency in experimental settings, however, the literature has so far predominantly reported on fluent speech production in AWS...
May 17, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576293/the-relationship-between-the-experience-of-stuttering-and-demographic-characteristics-of-adults-who-stutter
#6
Debora Freud, Marina Kichin-Brin, Ruth Ezrati-Vinacour, Ilan Roziner, Ofer Amir
PURPOSE: This study aims to examine the association between adults' experience of stuttering and their age, gender and marital status, as well as to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Hebrew version of the OASES-A. METHODS: The Hebrew version of the OASES-A was administered to 91 adults-who-stutter. The validity of the translated version was evaluated using a subset of 43 participants, who also completed three additional instruments: (a) a Perceived Stuttering Severity (PSS) self-rating scale, (b) the Situation Avoidance Behavior Checklist (SABC), (c) the Students Life Satisfaction scale (SLSS)...
June 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576292/a-country-wide-probability-sample-of-public-attitudes-toward-stuttering-in-portugal
#7
Ana Rita S Valente, Kenneth O St Louis, Margaret Leahy, Andreia Hall, Luis M T Jesus
BACKGROUND: Negative public attitudes toward stuttering have been widely reported, although differences among countries and regions exist. Clear reasons for these differences remain obscure. PURPOSE: Published research is unavailable on public attitudes toward stuttering in Portugal as well as a representative sample that explores stuttering attitudes in an entire country. This study sought to (a) determine the feasibility of a country-wide probability sampling scheme to measure public stuttering attitudes in Portugal using a standard instrument (the Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes-Stuttering [POSHA-S]) and (b) identify demographic variables that predict Portuguese attitudes...
June 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576291/a-pilot-study-into-a-possible-relationship-between-diet-and-stuttering
#8
Jean Hum, Toni Rietveld, Piet Wiedijk, Pascal van Lieshout
PURPOSE: There are theoretical and empirical reasons to consider a potential role for copper metabolism in the brain in how it could influence stuttering. However, a link between stuttering and dietary intake has never been researched in a systematic way. This pilot study therefore aimed to explore a possible association between ingested amounts of copper and thiamine (vitamin B1) with stuttering frequency using a double blind cross-over longitudinal paradigm. METHODS: 19 adults who stutter between 20 and 51 years old filled out an online survey for 9 consecutive weeks...
June 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28538833/research-about-suppression-effect-and-auditory-processing-in-individuals-who-stutter
#9
Cláudia Fassin Arcuri, Ana Maria Schiefer, Marisa Frasson de Azevedo
Purpose: To verify the auditory processing abilities and occurrence of the suppression effect of Otoacoustic Emissions (OAE) in individuals who stutter. Methods: The study sample comprised 15 adult individuals who stutter, aged 18-40 years, with stuttering severity ranging from mild to severe, paired according to gender, age, and schooling with individuals without speech complaint or disorder. All participants underwent conventional clinical evaluation, specific stuttering assessment, and basic (audiometry, imitanciometry, and measurement of acoustic reflexes) and specific (auditory processing evaluation and measurement of suppression effect of OAEs) audiological assessments...
May 22, 2017: CoDAS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28525541/safety-behaviors-and-stuttering
#10
Robyn Lowe, Fjola Helgadottir, Ross Menzies, Rob Heard, Sue O'Brian, Ann Packman, Mark Onslow
Purpose: Those who are socially anxious may use safety behaviors during feared social interactions to prevent negative outcomes. Safety behaviors are associated with anxiety maintenance and poorer treatment outcomes because they prevent fear extinction. Social anxiety disorder is often comorbid with stuttering. Speech pathologists reported in a recent publication (Helgadottir, Menzies, Onslow, Packman, & O'Brian, 2014a) that they often recommended procedures for clients that could be safety behaviors...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28483857/cortical-dynamics-of-disfluency-in-adults-who-stutter
#11
Ranit Sengupta, Shalin Shah, Torrey M J Loucks, Kristin Pelczarski, J Scott Yaruss, Katie Gore, Sazzad M Nasir
Stuttering is a disorder of speech production whose origins have been traced to the central nervous system. One of the factors that may underlie stuttering is aberrant neural miscommunication within the speech motor network. It is thus argued that disfluency (any interruption in the forward flow of speech) in adults who stutter (AWS) could be associated with anomalous cortical dynamics. Aberrant brain activity has been demonstrated in AWS in the absence of overt disfluency, but recording neural activity during disfluency is more challenging...
May 2017: Physiological Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28475659/fear-of-negative-evaluation-trait-anxiety-and-judgment-bias-in-adults-who-stutter
#12
Shelley B Brundage, Katherine L Winters, Janet M Beilby
Purpose: Persons who stutter (PWS) and those with social anxiety disorder may exhibit fear of negative evaluation (FNE) and anxiety in social situations. However, the information processing biases that perpetuate these characteristics have had limited investigation. This study investigated judgment bias in social situations. Method: Participants included 50 adults who stutter and 45 age- and gender-matched fluent persons who do not stutter (PWNS), who made up the control group...
May 17, 2017: American Journal of Speech-language Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432288/overexpression-of-human-nr2b-receptor-subunit-in-lman-causes-stuttering-and-song-sequence-changes-in-adult-zebra-finches
#13
Mukta Chakraborty, Liang-Fu Chen, Emma E Fridel, Marguerita E Klein, Rebecca A Senft, Abhra Sarkar, Erich D Jarvis
Zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) learn to produce songs in a manner reminiscent of spoken language development in humans. One candidate gene implicated in influencing learning is the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype 2B glutamate receptor (NR2B). Consistent with this idea, NR2B levels are high in the song learning nucleus LMAN (lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium) during juvenile vocal learning, and decreases to low levels in adults after learning is complete and the song becomes more stereotyped...
April 21, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28413060/stuttering-treatment-and-brain-research-in-adults-a-still-unfolding-relationship
#14
REVIEW
Roger J Ingham, Janis C Ingham, Harald A Euler, Katrin Neumann
PURPOSE: Brain imaging and brain stimulation procedures have now been used for more than two decades to investigate the neural systems that contribute to the occurrence of stuttering in adults, and to identify processes that might enhance recovery from stuttering. The purpose of this paper is to review the extent to which these dual lines of research with adults who stutter have intersected and whether they are contributing towards the alleviation of this impairment. METHOD: Several areas of research are reviewed in order to determine whether research on the neurology of stuttering is showing any potential for advancing the treatment of this communication disorder: (a) attempts to discover the neurology of stuttering, (b) neural changes associated with treated recovery, and (c) direct neural intervention...
February 28, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400266/eeg-mu-%C3%A2%C2%B5-rhythm-spectra-and-oscillatory-activity-differentiate-stuttering-from-non-stuttering-adults
#15
Tim Saltuklaroglu, Ashley W Harkrider, David Thornton, David Jenson, Tiffani Kittilstved
Stuttering is linked to sensorimotor deficits related to internal modeling mechanisms. This study compared spectral power and oscillatory activity of EEG mu (μ) rhythms between persons who stutter (PWS) and controls in listening and auditory discrimination tasks. EEG data were analyzed from passive listening in noise and accurate (same/different) discrimination of tones or syllables in quiet and noisy backgrounds. Independent component analysis identified left and/or right μ rhythms with characteristic alpha (α) and beta (β) peaks localized to premotor/motor regions in 23 of 27 people who stutter (PWS) and 24 of 27 controls...
June 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334398/maintenance-of-social-anxiety-in-stuttering-a-cognitive-behavioral-model
#16
Lisa Iverach, Ronald M Rapee, Quincy J J Wong, Robyn Lowe
Purpose: Stuttering is a speech disorder frequently accompanied by anxiety in social-evaluative situations. A growing body of research has confirmed a significant rate of social anxiety disorder among adults who stutter. Social anxiety disorder is a chronic and disabling anxiety disorder associated with substantial life impairment. Several influential models have described cognitive-behavioral factors that contribute to the maintenance of social anxiety in nonstuttering populations. The purpose of the present article is to apply these leading models to the experience of social anxiety for people who stutter...
May 17, 2017: American Journal of Speech-language Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28327784/comparison-between-the-speech-performance-of-fluent-speakers-and-individuals-who-stutter
#17
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Julia Biancalana Costa, Ana Paula Ritto, Fabiola Staróbole Juste, Claudia Regina Furquim de Andrade
Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the speech performance of fluent speakers and individuals who stutter during spontaneous speech, automatic speech, and singing. Methods: The study sample was composed of 34 adults, 17 individuals who stutter and 17 fluent controls, matched for gender and age. The speech performance of participants was compared by means of three tasks: monologue, automatic speech, and singing. The following aspects were assessed: total number of common disruptions and total number of stuttering-like disruptions...
March 16, 2017: CoDAS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28256029/auditory-motor-adaptation-is-reduced-in-adults-who-stutter-but-not-in-children-who-stutter
#18
Ayoub Daliri, Elizabeth A Wieland, Shanqing Cai, Frank H Guenther, Soo-Eun Chang
Previous studies have shown that adults who stutter produce smaller corrective motor responses to compensate for unexpected auditory perturbations in comparison to adults who do not stutter, suggesting that stuttering may be associated with deficits in integration of auditory feedback for online speech monitoring. In this study, we examined whether stuttering is also associated with deficiencies in integrating and using discrepancies between expected and received auditory feedback to adaptively update motor programs for accurate speech production...
March 2, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28212720/the-japanese-version-of-the-overall-assessment-of-the-speaker-s-experience-of-stuttering-for-adults-oases-a-j-translation-and-psychometric-evaluation
#19
Naomi Sakai, Shin Ying Chu, Koichi Mori, J Scott Yaruss
PURPOSE: This study evaluates the psychometric performance of the Japanese version of the Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering for Adults (OASES-A), a comprehensive assessment tool of individuals who stutter. METHODS: The OASES-A-J was administered to 200 adults who stutter in Japan. All respondents also evaluated their own speech (SA scale), satisfaction of their own speech (SS scale) and the Japanese translation version of the Modified Erickson Communication Attitude scale (S-24)...
March 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28212717/japanese-normative-data-for-the-unhelpful-thoughts-and-beliefs-about-stuttering-utbas-scales-for-adults-who-stutter
#20
Shin Ying Chu, Naomi Sakai, Koichi Mori, Lisa Iverach
PURPOSE: This study reports Japanese normative data for the Unhelpful Thoughts and Beliefs about Stuttering (UTBAS) scales. We outline the translation process, and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Japanese version of the UTBAS scales. METHODS: The translation of the UTBAS scales into Japanese (UTBAS-J) was completed using the standard forward-backward translation process, and was administered to 130 Japanese adults who stutter. To validate the UTBAS-J scales, scores for the Japanese and Australian cohorts were compared...
March 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
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