keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Stuttering in adults

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28197011/the-efficacy-of-cognitive-behavior-therapy-in-an-adult-who-stutters
#1
Sanjeev Kumar Gupta
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Indian Journal of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28159356/a-real-time-phoneme-counting-algorithm-and-application-for-speech-rate-monitoring
#2
Vered Aharonson, Eran Aharonson, Katia Raichlin-Levi, Aviv Sotzianu, Ofer Amir, Zehava Ovadia-Blechman
Adults who stutter can learn to control and improve their speech fluency by modifying their speaking rate. Existing speech therapy technologies can assist this practice by monitoring speaking rate and providing feedback to the patient, but cannot provide an accurate, quantitative measurement of speaking rate. Moreover, most technologies are too complex and costly to be used for home practice. We developed an algorithm and a smartphone application that monitor a patient's speaking rate in real time and provide user-friendly feedback to both patient and therapist...
January 15, 2017: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28113105/reorganization-of-brain-function-after-a-short-term-behavioral-intervention-for-stuttering
#3
Chunming Lu, Lifen Zheng, Yuhang Long, Qian Yan, Guosheng Ding, Li Liu, Danling Peng, Peter Howell
This study investigated changes in brain function that occurred over a 7-day behavioral intervention for adults who stutter (AWS). Thirteen AWS received the intervention (AWS+), and 13 AWS did not receive the intervention (AWS-). There were 13 fluent controls (FC-). All participants were scanned before and after the intervention. Whole-brain analysis pre-intervention showed significant differences in task-related brain activation between AWS and FC- in the right inferior frontal cortex (IFC) and left middle temporal cortex, but there were no differences between the two AWS groups...
January 20, 2017: Brain and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068353/speech-timing-deficit-of-stuttering-evidence-from-contingent-negative-variations
#4
Ning Ning, Danling Peng, Xiangping Liu, Shuang Yang
The aim of the present study was to investigate the speech preparation processes of adults who stutter (AWS). Fifteen AWS and fifteen adults with fluent speech (AFS) participated in the experiment. The event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in a foreperiod paradigm. The warning signal (S1) was a color square, and the following imperative stimulus (S2) was either a white square (the Go signal that required participants to name the color of S1) or a white dot (the NoGo signal that prevents participants from speaking)...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28035724/reduced-perfusion-in-broca-s-area-in-developmental-stuttering
#5
Jay Desai, Yuankai Huo, Zhishun Wang, Ravi Bansal, Steven C R Williams, David Lythgoe, Fernando O Zelaya, Bradley S Peterson
OBJECTIVE: To study resting cerebral blood flow in children and adults with developmental stuttering. METHODS: We acquired pulsed arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging data in 26 participants with stuttering and 36 healthy, fluent controls. While covarying for age, sex, and IQ, we compared perfusion values voxel-wise across diagnostic groups and assessed correlations of perfusion with stuttering severity within the stuttering group and with measures of motor speed in both groups...
December 30, 2016: Human Brain Mapping
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936963/stuttering-in-relation-to-the-morphophonemics-of-kannada
#6
Horabail S Venkatagiri, Nuggehalli P Nataraja, M Deepthi
The present study investigated the effect of certain unique morphophonemic features of Kannada words on the rate of stutters in a group of 22 adolescent and adult persons who stuttered in an oral reading task. A linear regression analysis showed that word length ranging from 1 to 8 syllables was a potent variable in the occurrence of stutters accounting for 25.3% of stutters. A composite index of morphophonemic complexity with points assigned for sandhi, geminates, consonant clusters, and number of morphemes accounted for a small 7...
December 12, 2016: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936276/the-impact-of-social-cognitive-stress-on-speech-variability-determinism-and-stability-in-adults-who-do-and-do-not-stutter
#7
Eric S Jackson, Mark Tiede, Deryk Beal, D H Whalen
Purpose: This study examined the impact of social-cognitive stress on sentence-level speech variability, determinism, and stability in adults who stutter (AWS) and adults who do not stutter (AWNS). We demonstrated that complementing the spatiotemporal index (STI) with recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) provides a novel approach to both assessing and interpreting speech variability in stuttering. Method: Twenty AWS and 21 AWNS repeated sentences in audience and nonaudience conditions while their lip movements were tracked...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27930777/involvement-of-the-central-cognitive-mechanism-in-word-production-in-adults-who-stutter
#8
Pei-Tzu Tsai, Nan Bernstein Ratner
Purpose: The study examined whether semantic and phonological encoding processes were capacity demanding, involving the central cognitive mechanism, in adults who do and do not stutter (AWS and NS) to better understand the role of cognitive demand in linguistic processing and stuttering. We asked (a) whether the two linguistic processes in AWS are capacity demanding, which can temporally disrupt the processing of a concurrent nonlinguistic task, and (b) whether AWS and NS show similar patterns of temporal disruption in the two processes...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27919696/the-role-of-anxiety-in-stuttering-evidence-from-functional-connectivity
#9
Yang Yang, Fanlu Jia, Wai Ting Siok, Li Hai Tan
Persistent developmental stuttering is a neurologically based speech disorder associated with cognitive-linguistic, motor and emotional abnormalities. Previous studies investigating the relationship between anxiety and stuttering have yielded mixed results, but it has not yet been examined whether anxiety influences brain activity underlying stuttering. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the functional connectivity associated with state anxiety in a syllable repetition task, and trait anxiety during rest in adults who stutter (N=19) and fluent controls (N=19)...
December 2, 2016: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27907811/using-the-oases-a-to-illustrate-how-network-analysis-can-be-applied-to-understand-the-experience-of-stuttering
#10
Cynthia S Q Siew, Kristin M Pelczarski, J Scott Yaruss, Michael S Vitevitch
PURPOSE: Network science uses mathematical and computational techniques to examine how individual entities in a system, represented by nodes, interact, as represented by connections between nodes. This approach has been used by Cramer et al. (2010) to make "symptom networks" to examine various psychological disorders. In the present analysis we examined a network created from the items in the Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering-Adult (OASES-A), a commonly used measure for evaluating adverse impact in the lives of people who stutter...
November 21, 2016: Journal of Communication Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893013/proton-chemical-shift-imaging-of-the-brain-in-pediatric-and-adult-developmental-stuttering
#11
Joseph O'Neill, Zhengchao Dong, Ravi Bansal, Iliyan Ivanov, Xuejun Hao, Jay Desai, Elena Pozzi, Bradley S Peterson
Importance: Developmental stuttering is a neuropsychiatric condition of incompletely understood brain origin. Our recent functional magnetic resonance imaging study indicates a possible partial basis of stuttering in circuits enacting self-regulation of motor activity, attention, and emotion. Objective: To further characterize the neurophysiology of stuttering through in vivo assay of neurometabolites in suspect brain regions. Design, Setting, and Participants: Proton chemical shift imaging of the brain was performed in a case-control study of children and adults with and without stuttering...
January 1, 2017: JAMA Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865231/long-term-consequences-of-childhood-bullying-in-adults-who-stutter-social-anxiety-fear-of-negative-evaluation-self-esteem-and-satisfaction-with-life
#12
Gordon W Blood, Ingrid M Blood
PURPOSE: Psychosocial disorders have been reported in adults who stutter, especially social anxiety disorder. Social anxiety has been linked to childhood victimization. It is possible that recalled childhood victimization could be linked to psychosocial problems reported in some adults who stutter. METHOD: Participants were 36 adults who stutter and 36 adults who do not stutter (mean age=21.9 years). The Retrospective Bullying Questionnaire was completed for primary school, secondary school and university environments for physical, verbal, relational and cyber bullying...
December 2016: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865229/a-comparison-of-three-strategies-for-reducing-the-public-stigma-associated-with-stuttering
#13
Michael P Boyle, Lauren Dioguardi, Julie E Pate
PURPOSE: The effects of three anti-stigma strategies for stuttering-contact (hearing personal stories from an individual who stutters), education (replacing myths about stuttering with facts), and protest (condemning negative attitudes toward people who stutter)-were examined on attitudes, emotions, and behavioral intentions toward people who stutter. METHOD: Two hundred and twelve adults recruited from a nationwide survey in the United States were randomly assigned to one of the three anti-stigma conditions or a control condition...
December 2016: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865226/an-investigation-of-the-effects-of-a-speech-restructuring-treatment-for-stuttering-on-the-distribution-of-intervals-of-phonation
#14
Lisa Brown, Linda Wilson, Ann Packman, Mark Halaki, Mark Onslow, Ross Menzies
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether stuttering reductions following the instatement phase of a speech-restructuring treatment for adults were accompanied by reductions in the frequency of short intervals of phonation (PIs). The study was prompted by the possibility that reductions in the frequency of short PIs is the mechanism underlying such reductions in stuttering. METHOD: The distribution of PIs was determined for seven adults who stutter, before and immediately after the intensive phase of a speech-restructuring treatment program...
December 2016: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27833009/anomaly-in-neural-phase-coherence-accompanies-reduced-sensorimotor-integration-in-adults-who-stutter
#15
Ranit Sengupta, Shalin Shah, Katie Gore, Torrey Loucks, Sazzad M Nasir
Despite advances in our understanding of the human speech system, the neurophysiological basis of stuttering remains largely unknown. Here, it is hypothesized that the speech of adults who stutter (AWS) is susceptible to disruptions in sensorimotor integration caused by neural miscommunication within the speech motor system. Human speech unfolds over rapid timescales and relies on a distributed system of brain regions working in a parallel and synchronized manner, and a breakdown in neural communication between the putative brain regions could increase susceptibility to dysfluency...
December 2016: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27810647/investigating-the-feasibility-of-using-transcranial-direct-current-stimulation-to-enhance-fluency-in-people-who-stutter
#16
Jennifer Chesters, Kate E Watkins, Riikka Möttönen
Developmental stuttering is a disorder of speech fluency affecting 1% of the adult population. Long-term reductions in stuttering are difficult for adults to achieve with behavioural therapies. We investigated whether a single session of transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) could improve fluency in people who stutter (PWS). In separate sessions, either anodal TDCS (1mA for 20min) or sham stimulation was applied over the left inferior frontal cortex while PWS read sentences aloud. Fluency was induced during the stimulation period by using choral speech, that is, participants read in unison with another speaker...
January 2017: Brain and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27752375/embolic-stroke-due-to-a-common-carotid-artery-thrombus-in-a-young-patient-with-severe-iron-deficiency-anemia-without-thrombocytosis
#17
David Roshal
This case report describes a 41-year-old previously healthy male who presented with stuttering transient ischemic symptoms and radiographic evidence of a left common carotid artery thrombus as well as acute and subacute ischemic infarcts in the left middle cerebral artery territory. An exhaustive stroke work-up did not provide a plausible etiology for his symptoms. His complete blood count and iron studies, however, revealed evidence of severe iron-deficiency anemia without reactive thrombocytosis. His stool guaiac test was positive...
2016: Case Reports in Neurological Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27720393/utility-of-virtual-reality-environments-to-examine-physiological-reactivity-and-subjective-distress-in-adults-who-stutter
#18
Shelley B Brundage, James M Brinton, Adrienne B Hancock
PURPOSE: Virtual reality environments (VREs) allow for immersion in speaking environments that mimic real-life interactions while maintaining researcher control. VREs have been used successfully to engender arousal in other disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of virtual reality environments to examine physiological reactivity and subjective ratings of distress in persons who stutter (PWS). METHOD: Subjective and objective measures of arousal were collected from 10PWS during four-minute speeches to a virtual audience and to a virtual empty room...
December 2016: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27711148/altered-modulation-of-silent-period-in-tongue-motor-cortex-of-persistent-developmental-stuttering-in-relation-to-stuttering-severity
#19
Pierpaolo Busan, Giovanni Del Ben, Simona Bernardini, Giulia Natarelli, Marco Bencich, Fabrizio Monti, Paolo Manganotti, Piero Paolo Battaglini
Motor balance in developmental stuttering (DS) was investigated with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), with the aim to define novel neural markers of persistent DS in adulthood. Eleven DS adult males were evaluated with TMS on tongue primary motor cortex, compared to 15 matched fluent speakers, in a "state" condition (i.e. stutterers vs. fluent speakers, no overt stuttering). Motor and silent period thresholds (SPT), recruitment curves, and silent period durations were acquired by recording tongue motor evoked potentials...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27693846/grey-matter-volume-differences-in-the-left-caudate-nucleus-of-people-who-stutter
#20
Paul F Sowman, Margaret Ryan, Blake W Johnson, Greg Savage, Stephen Crain, Elisabeth Harrison, Erin Martin, Hana Burianová
The cause of stuttering has many theoretical explanations. A number of research groups have suggested changes in the volume and/or function of the striatum as a causal agent. Two recent studies in children and one in adults who stutter (AWS) report differences in striatal volume compared that seen in controls; however, the laterality and nature of this anatomical volume difference is not consistent across studies. The current study investigated whether a reduction in striatal grey matter volume, comparable to that seen in children who stutter (CWS), would be found in AWS...
January 2017: Brain and Language
keyword
keyword
43647
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"