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Stuttering in adults

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29873568/rhythmic-speech-and-stuttering-reduction-in-a-syllable-timed-language
#1
Thomas Law, Ann Packman, Mark Onslow, Carol K-S To, Michael C-F Tong, Kathy Y-S Lee
Speaking rhythmically, also known as syllable-timed speech (STS), has been known for centuries to be a fluency-inducing condition for people who stutter. Cantonese is a tonal syllable-timed language and it has been shown that, of all languages, Cantonese is the most rhythmic (Mok, 2009). However, it is not known if STS reduces stuttering in Cantonese as it does in English. This is the first study to investigate the effects of STS on stuttering in a syllable-timed language. Nineteen native Cantonese-speaking adults who stutter were engaged in conversational tasks in Cantonese under two conditions: one in their usual speaking style and one using STS...
June 6, 2018: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29870993/the-effects-of-emotion-on-second-formant-frequency-fluctuations-in-adults-who-stutter
#2
Kim R Bauerly
OBJECTIVE: Changes in second formant frequency fluctuations (FFF2) were examined in adults who stutter (AWS) and adults who do not stutter (ANS) when producing nonwords under varying emotional conditions. METHODS: Ten AWS and 10 ANS viewed images selected from the International Affective Picture System representing dimensions of arousal (e.g., excited versus bored) and hedonic valence (e.g., happy versus sad). Immediately following picture presentation, participants produced a consonant-vowel + final /t/ (CVt) nonword consisting of the initial sounds /p/, /b/, /s/, or /z/, followed by a vowel (/i/, /u/, /ε/) and a final /t/...
June 5, 2018: Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29755328/evidence-for-a-resting-state-network-abnormality-in-adults-who-stutter
#3
Amir H Ghaderi, Masoud N Andevari, Paul F Sowman
Neural network-based investigations of stuttering have begun to provide a possible integrative account for the large number of brain-based anomalies associated with stuttering. Here we used resting-state EEG to investigate functional brain networks in adults who stutter ( AWS ). Participants were 19 AWS and 52 age-, and gender-matched normally fluent speakers. EEGs were recorded and connectivity matrices were generated by LORETA in the theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta1 (12-20 Hz), and beta2 (20-30 Hz) bands...
2018: Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29754132/recovery-of-brain-abscess-induced-stuttering-after-neurosurgical-intervention
#4
Daisuke Sudo, Youichi Doutake, Hidenori Yokota, Eiju Watanabe
Stuttering occurs in approximately 5% of all children and 1% of adults. One type, neurogenic stuttering, is usually attributable to strokes or other structural damages to the brain areas that are responsible for language fluency. Here, we present the first case of neurogenic stuttering caused by a brain abscess. The patient was a 60-year-old man admitted for a seizure and administered an anticonvulsant, after which he began stuttering. MRI revealed a brain abscess in the left frontal lobe that extended to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA (Brodmann's area) 9 and 46), frontal eye field (BA 8) and premotor cortex and supplementary motor area (BA 6)...
May 12, 2018: BMJ Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29738875/effects-of-measurement-method-and-transcript-availability-on-inexperienced-raters-stuttering-frequency-scores
#5
Nalanda Chakraborty, Kenneth J Logan
PURPOSE: To examine the effects of measurement method and transcript availability on the accuracy, reliability, and efficiency of inexperienced raters' stuttering frequency measurements. METHOD: 44 adults, all inexperienced at evaluating stuttered speech, underwent 20 min of preliminary training in stuttering measurement and then analyzed a series of sentences, with and without access to transcripts of sentence stimuli, using either a syllable-based analysis (SBA) or an utterance-based analysis (UBA)...
April 24, 2018: Journal of Communication Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29723653/a-persian-version-of-the-stuttering-severity-instrument-version-four-ssi-4-how-the-new-additions-to-ssi-4-complement-its-stuttering-severity-score
#6
Neda Tahmasebi, Bijan Shafie, Hamid Karimi, Masood Mazaheri
PURPOSE: The fourth version of the Stuttering Severity Instrument (SSI-4) has been available since 2009. It has some modifications and new features which make it more appropriate at least for clinical practice, although further documentation is needed. The objective of the current research was to translate SSI-4 into Persian language and to discuss its relative and absolute reliability as well as its criterion validity for Persian adults who stutter (PWS). We also aimed to study how the new subjective self-reports of the SSI-4 complement the stuttering severity score obtained from the SSI-3 or the SSI-4...
April 23, 2018: Journal of Communication Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713098/successful-management-of-psychotropics-induced-stuttering-priapism-with-pseudoephedrine-in-a-patient-with-schizophrenia
#7
Srinagesh Mannekote Thippaiah, Soumya Nagaraja, Badari Birur, Ananda Pandurangi
Stuttering Priapism is a recurrent, persistent penile erection in the absence of sexual desire due to altered genital hemodynamics, affecting the arterial component (high flow, non-ischemic) or the veno-occlusive mechanism (low flow, ischemic). Both typical and atypical antipsychotics increase the risk for priapism with greater implications in typicals than atypicals. Prompt recognition and treatment are important as 40% to 50% of patients with stuttering priapism may develop an erectile dysfunction if left untreated...
February 5, 2018: Psychopharmacology Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29680798/corpus-callosum-demyelination-associated-with-acquired-stuttering
#8
Barbara McElwee Decker, Barry Guitar, Andrew Solomon
Compared with developmental stuttering, adult onset acquired stuttering is rare. However, several case reports describe acquired stuttering and an association with callosal pathology. Interestingly, these cases share a neuroanatomical localisation also demonstrated in developmental stuttering. We present a case of adult onset acquired stuttering associated with inflammatory demyelination within the corpus callosum. This patient's disfluency improved after the initiation of immunomodulatory therapy.
April 21, 2018: BMJ Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29670516/the-effects-of-fluency-enhancing-conditions-on-sensorimotor-control-of-speech-in-typically-fluent-speakers-an-eeg-mu-rhythm-study
#9
Tiffani Kittilstved, Kevin J Reilly, Ashley W Harkrider, Devin Casenhiser, David Thornton, David E Jenson, Tricia Hedinger, Andrew L Bowers, Tim Saltuklaroglu
Objective : To determine whether changes in sensorimotor control resulting from speaking conditions that induce fluency in people who stutter (PWS) can be measured using electroencephalographic (EEG) mu rhythms in neurotypical speakers. Methods : Non-stuttering (NS) adults spoke in one control condition (solo speaking) and four experimental conditions (choral speech, delayed auditory feedback (DAF), prolonged speech and pseudostuttering). Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify sensorimotor μ components from EEG recordings...
2018: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29648952/reliability-and-validity-evidence-of-the-assessment-of-language-use-in-social-contexts-for-adults-alusca
#10
Ana Rita S Valente, Andreia Hall, Helena Alvelos, Margaret Leahy, Luis M T Jesus
BACKGROUND: The appropriate use of language in context depends on the speaker's pragmatic language competencies. A coding system was used to develop a specific and adult-focused self-administered questionnaire to adults who stutter and adults who do not stutter, The Assessment of Language Use in Social Contexts for Adults, with three categories: precursors, basic exchanges, and extended literal/non-literal discourse. This paper presents the content validity, item analysis, reliability coefficients and evidences of construct validity of the instrument...
April 12, 2018: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29623339/maintenance-of-improved-attitudes-toward-stuttering
#11
Kenneth O St Louis, Timothy W Flynn
Purpose: This study sought to determine the extent to which experimentally induced positive attitudes in high school students in a previous investigation were maintained 7 years later. Method: Authors and assistants recruited 36 adults in their early 20s (Follow-up group) who, in high school, had witnessed either a live oral talk by a person who stutters or a professionally made video on stuttering designed for teens followed by a short talk by the same speaker...
May 3, 2018: American Journal of Speech-language Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29602052/comparison-of-adults-who-stutter-with-and-without-social-anxiety-disorder
#12
Lisa Iverach, Mark Jones, Robyn Lowe, Susan O'Brian, Ross G Menzies, Ann Packman, Mark Onslow
PURPOSE: Social anxiety disorder is a debilitating anxiety disorder associated with significant life impairment. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate overall functioning for adults who stutter with and without a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder. METHOD: Participants were 275 adults who stuttered (18-80 years), including 219 males (79.6%) and 56 females (20.4%), who were enrolled to commence speech treatment for stuttering. Comparisons were made between participants diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (n = 82, 29...
June 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29596670/facilitating-fluency-in-adults-who-stutter
#13
Jennifer T Crinion
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 1, 2018: Brain: a Journal of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29574262/enacted-stigma-and-felt-stigma-experienced-by-adults-who-stutter
#14
Michael P Boyle
PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to (1) document the experiences of enacted stigma (external stigma, experienced discrimination) and felt stigma (anticipation and expectation of discrimination or negative treatment by others) in adults who stutter, (2) investigate their relationships to each other, and (3) investigate their relationships to global mental health. METHOD: Participants were 324 adults who stutter recruited from clinicians and self-help group leaders in the United States...
May 2018: Journal of Communication Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29569967/characteristics-of-adults-who-stutter-by-treatments-sought
#15
Lisa Iverach, Mark Jones, Robyn Lowe, Susan O'Brian, Ross G Menzies, Ann Packman, Mark Onslow
Several treatment approaches are available for adults who stutter, including speech treatment, cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) treatment for anxiety, and a combination of both. It is useful to determine whether any differences exist between adults who stutter enrolled in different types of treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare demographic, speech, and psychological characteristics of adults who stutter enrolled in speech, psychological, and combined treatment programs. Participants were 288 adults who stuttered (18-80 years) enrolled in one of three different treatment programs: Speech Treatment for stuttering (n = 134), Anxiety Treatment for anxiety about stuttering (n = 70), or Speech Treatment for Stuttering With or Without Anxiety Treatment (n = 84)...
March 23, 2018: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29558672/beliefs-and-behavioural-intentions-towards-pharmacotherapy-for-stuttering-a-survey-of-adults-who-stutter
#16
Allan McGroarty, Rebecca McCartan
PURPOSE: Although considerable efforts have been made to investigate the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for stuttering, little is known about how the stuttering community perceives these treatments. This study aimed to assess and quantify beliefs regarding pharmacotherapy for adults who stutter and to establish whether behavioural intentions to undertake treatment were related to these beliefs. METHOD: An adapted version of the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire was completed by adults who stutter...
May 2018: Journal of Communication Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29533938/uniqueness-point-effects-during-speech-planning-in-adults-who-do-and-do-not-stutter
#17
Geoffrey A Coalson, Courtney T Byrd, Amanda Kuylen
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Previous studies employing a variety of tasks have demonstrated that adults who stutter (AWS) pre-sent with phonological encoding differences compared to adults who do not stutter (AWNS). The present study examined whether atypical preverbal monitoring also influenced AWS performance during one such paradigm - the silent phoneme monitoring task. Specifically, we investigated whether monitoring latencies for AWS were accelerated after the word's uniqueness point - the phoneme that isolates the word from all lexical competitors - as observed for AWNS when monitoring internal and external speech...
March 13, 2018: Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29454469/use-of-a-phoneme-monitoring-task-to-examine-lexical-access-in-adults-who-do-and-do-not-stutter
#18
Timothy A Howell, Nan Bernstein Ratner
Previous work has postulated that a deficit in lexicalization may be an underlying cause of a stuttering disorder (Prins, Main, & Wampler, 1997; Wingate, 1988). This study investigates the time course of lexicalization of nouns and verbs in adults who stutter. A generalized phoneme monitoring (PM) paradigm was used. Adults who stutter (AWS) and typically-fluent peers both showed an expected effect of word class (verbs yielded slower and less accurate monitoring than nouns), as well as phoneme position (word medial/final phonemes yielded slower and less accurate monitoring than word initial phonemes)...
February 6, 2018: Journal of Fluency Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29421786/speaker-and-observer-perceptions-of-physical-tension-during-stuttering
#19
Seth Tichenor, Paula Leslie, Susan Shaiman, J Scott Yaruss
PURPOSE: Speech-language pathologists routinely assess physical tension during evaluation of those who stutter. If speakers experience tension that is not visible to clinicians, then judgments of severity may be inaccurate. This study addressed this potential discrepancy by comparing judgments of tension by people who stutter and expert clinicians to determine if clinicians could accurately identify the speakers' experience of physical tension. METHOD: Ten adults who stutter were audio-video recorded in two speaking samples...
2017: Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29421268/high-prevalence-of-pineal-cysts-in-adults-who-stutter
#20
Richard M Arenas, Jody M Shoemaker, John Phillips
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Brain and Language
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