Read by QxMD icon Read

Group a streptococcal

Diana Lennon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2018: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Anny Lam, Magnus Rasmussen, Olof Thompson
BACKGROUND/AIM: Streptococci cause approximately 10% of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs). The aim of this study was to identify the characteristics of patients with streptococcal PJIs and to describe the treatment and outcome of streptococcal PJIs in Skåne county between 2011 and 2015. METHODS: Patients with streptococcal PJIs with positive cultures or PCRs on samples from joint aspirate and/or periprosthetic tissue between 2011 and 2015 in Skåne county, were identified and medical records were studied...
March 13, 2018: Infectious Diseases
Afsaneh Khani, Nicole Popp, Bernd Kreikemeyer, Nadja Patenge
Regulatory RNAs play important roles in the control of bacterial gene expression. In this study, we investigated gene expression regulation by a putative glycine riboswitch located in the 5'-untranslated region of a sodium:alanine symporter family (SAF) protein gene in the group A Streptococcus pyogenes serotype M49 strain 591. Glycine-dependent gene expression mediated by riboswitch activity was studied using a luciferase reporter gene system. Maximal reporter gene expression was observed in the absence of glycine and in the presence of low glycine concentrations...
2018: Frontiers in Microbiology
Michael Gottlieb, Brit Long, Alex Koyfman
BACKGROUND: Pharyngitis is a common disease in the emergency department (ED). Despite a relatively low incidence of complications, there are many dangerous conditions that can mimic this disease and are essential for the emergency physician to consider. OBJECTIVE: This article provides a review of the evaluation and management of group A β-hemolytic Streptococcal (GABHS) pharyngitis, as well as important medical conditions that can mimic this disease. DISCUSSION: GABHS pharyngitis often presents with fever, sore throat, tonsillar exudates, and anterior cervical lymphadenopathy...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Kathryn A Patras, Victor Nizet
Group B Streptococcus (GBS) colonizes the gastrointestinal and vaginal epithelium of a significant percentage of healthy women, with potential for ascending intrauterine infection or transmission during parturition, creating a risk of serious disease in the vulnerable newborn. This review highlights new insights on the bacterial virulence determinants, host immune responses, and microbiome interactions that underpin GBS vaginal colonization, the proximal step in newborn infectious disease pathogenesis. From the pathogen perspective, the function GBS adhesins and biofilms, β-hemolysin/cytolysin toxin, immune resistance factors, sialic acid mimicry, and two-component transcriptional regulatory systems are reviewed...
2018: Frontiers in Pediatrics
Johannes Westman, Bhavya Chakrakodi, Johanna Snäll, Matthias Mörgelin, Martin Bruun Madsen, Ole Hyldegaard, Ariane Neumann, Inga-Maria Frick, Anna Norrby-Teglund, Lars Björck, Heiko Herwald
Innate immunity relies on an effective recognition of the pathogenic microorganism as well as on endogenous danger signals. While bacteria in concert with their secreted virulence factors can cause a number of inflammatory reactions, danger signals released at the site of infection may in addition determine the amplitude of such responses and influence the outcome of the disease. Here, we report that protein SIC, Streptococcal Inhibitor of Complement, an abundant secreted protein from Streptococcus pyogenes , binds to extracellular histones, a group of danger signals released during necrotizing tissue damage...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Masahiro Nishiyama, Ichiro Morioka, Mariko Taniguchi-Ikeda, Takeshi Mori, Kazumi Tomioka, Keita Nakanishi, Junya Fujimura, Noriyuki Nishimura, Kandai Nozu, Hiroaki Nagase, Kazuto Ishibashi, Akihito Ishida, Kazumoto Iijima
Objectives To identify clinical features that predict Group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis in a Japanese paediatric primary emergency medical centre. Methods The prevalence of GAS pharyngitis according to age and body temperature (BT) was calculated among 3098 paediatric patients with pharyngitis. The numbers of GAS-positive and -negative patients for each clinical parameter, and each point increase in the McIsaac score were compared and likelihood ratios (LRs) were calculated. Results The prevalence of GAS pharyngitis was extremely low in patients aged < 1 (1...
January 1, 2018: Journal of International Medical Research
Elita Jauneikaite, Georgia Kapatai, Frances Davies, Ioana Gozar, Juliana Coelho, Kathleen B Bamford, Benedetto Simone, Lipi Begum, Shannon Katiyo, Bharat Patel, Peter Hoffman, Theresa Lamagni, Eimear T Brannigan, Alison Holmes, Tokozani Kadhani, Tracey Galletly, Kate Martin, Hermione Lyall, Yimmy Chow, Sunit Godambe, Victoria Chalker, Shiranee Sriskandan
Background: Invasive Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of serious neonatal infection. Current strategies to reduce early onset GBS disease have no impact on late onset disease (LOD). Although GBS is a normal part of the enteric microbiota in healthy term infants, LOD cases arising in the neonatal intensive care unit setting raise questions about mode of acquisition. Methods: Enhanced surveillance for any case of late onset GBS sepsis admitted to a level 3, 24-bed neonatal intensive care unit over a 2 year period was instituted following a cluster of four cases...
March 2, 2018: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Irene A Stafford, Eliza Rodrigue, Alexandra Berra, Wesley Adams, Asha J Heard, Joseph L Hagan, Shawn J Stafford
BACKGROUND: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a leading cause of newborn gastrointestinal emergencies, affecting 1-3 per 1000 live births. Although NEC has been linked to a microbial etiology, associations with maternal intrapartum and resultant newborn early-onset invasive Group B streptococcus (EO-GBS) have been weakly defined. OBJECTIVE: The study aim was to determine the relationship between EO-GBS and NEC. STUDY DESIGN: Data from 2008 to 2015 were collected from pediatric records with ICD diagnosis codes consistent with all stages of NEC, with the exception of neonatal EO-GBS data (only available 2011-2015)...
February 24, 2018: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology
Khadija Mzoughi, Ihsen Zairi, Samia Ben Hamida, Sofien Kamoun, Fethia Ben Moussa, Sana Fennira, Sondos Kraiem
INTRODUCTION: Infectious endocarditis (IE) is a rare disease with a high mortality. In 2009, the European society of cardiology restricted antibiotic prophylaxis to a smaller number of cardiac conditions with very high risk for IE. Did these changes in the guidelines have an impact on the epidemiological and bacteriological profile of IE? AIM: The main aim of our work was to study the evolution of the microbiological profile of IE from 1991 to 2016. METHODS: We realized an analytic retrospective study comparing two groups: group 1 included patients admitted for a certain IE before September 2009 and group 2 those admitted after that date...
April 2017: La Tunisie Médicale
Takahiro Yamaguchi, Ryuji Kawahara, Chihiro Katsukawa, Masashi Kanki, Tetsuya Harada, Shinya Yonogi, Satomi Iwasaki, Hirokazu Uehara, Saori Okajima, Hiroshi Nishimura, Kazushi Motomura, Masaya Miyazono, Yuko Kumeda, Kentaro Kawatsu
In September 2016, 140 patients with primary symptoms of sore throat and fever were identified in a school dormitory in Osaka, Japan. Epidemiological and laboratory investigations determined that this symptomatic condition was a food-borne outbreak of group G Streptococcus (GGS), with GGS being isolated from samples from patients, cooks and foods. The strain of GGS was identified as Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) of two emm types ( stG 652.0 and st C36.0). The causative food, a broccoli salad, was contaminated with the two types of SDSE, totaling 1...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Cankat Kara, Ceren Gökmenoglu, Onur Sahin, Sezgi Cinel, Nihal Belduz Kara, Elif Sadik
OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate a supportive treatment option based on microorganism's growth characteristics. METHODS: This study was conducted at Ordu University, Faculty of Dentistry, Turkey, between January and April, 2017, comprising patients whose periodontal parameters and saliva pH scores were measured before and after the treatments. The patients were divided into two equal groups. Group I underwent routine periodontal treatment methods for streptococcal gingivitis, while a supportive treatment that involved an antacid chewing tablet two times a day for a week based on the microorganism's growth characteristics was used on patients in Group II...
February 2018: JPMA. the Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
Helgi Padari, Tuuli Metsvaht, Eva Germovsek, Charlotte I Barker, Karin Kipper, Koit Herodes, Joseph F Standing, Kersti Oselin, Tõnis Tasa, Hiie Soeorg, Irja Lutsar
Group B streptococci are common causative agents of early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS). Pharmacokinetic (PK) data for penicillin G have been described for extremely preterm neonates but poorly for late-preterm and term neonates. Thus, evidence-based dosing recommendations are lacking. We described PK of penicillin G in neonates with gestational age (GA) ≥32 weeks and postnatal age <72 h. Penicillin G was administered intravenously at a dose of 25,000 or 50,000 IU/kg/q12h. At steady state, PK blood samples were collected prior to and at 5 min, 1 h, 3 h, 8 h, 12 h after injection...
February 20, 2018: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Tali Capua, Amir Klivitsky, Efraim Bilavsky, Liat Ashkenazi-Hoffnung, Jonathan Roth, Shlomi Constantini, Galia Grisaru-Soen
Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a rare cause of central nervous system infections. We describe 3 new cases of GAS brain abscess in previously healthy children treated by us between 2015-2016 and review the 5 cases reported in the literature since 1988. All 8 children received early empiric antibiotic therapy and surgical intervention, and 5 made a full recovery. GAS brain abscess is a rare infection; however its incidence may be rising. We suggest that if patients show symptoms such as fever, vomiting, and lethargy, with contiguous infection such as otitis media, mastoiditis, sinusitis, or meningitis, GAS brain abscess should be suspected...
February 16, 2018: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Alex Remmington, Claire E Turner
DNases are abundant among the pathogenic streptococci, with most species harbouring genes for at least one. Despite their prevalence, however, the role for these extracellular enzymes is still relatively unclear. The DNases of the Lancefield group A Streptococcus, S. pyogenes are the best characterized, with a total of eight DNase genes identified so far. Six are known to be associated with integrated prophages. Two are chromosomally encoded, and one of these is cell-wall anchored. Homologues of both prophage-associated and chromosomally encoded S...
January 25, 2018: Microbiology
Jinzhu Ma, Liquan Yu, Baifen Song, Yongzhong Yu, Shaoduo Zhang, Yuhua Wei, Zhijun Wu, Di Yao, Wei Yu, Zhanbo Zhu, Yudong Cui
PURPOSE: In this study, we prepared GapC1-150-IsdB126-361-TRAP (GIT) proteins plus heat-labile enterotoxin B (LTB) as an intra-molecular adjuvant, together with CpG to further enhance its immunogenicity. METHODOLOGY: Initially, the target genes were acquired and inserted into pET-32a (+) vectors to express LTB-GIT protein. LTB-GIT expression was confirmed by Western blotting and its immunocompetence was estimated through ELISA. Further, we immunized BALB/c mice with the LTB-GIT plus CpG adjuvant...
January 17, 2018: Journal of Medical Microbiology
Victoria M Allen, Mark H Yudin
OBJECTIVE: To provide information regarding the management of group B streptococcal (GBS) bacteriuria to midwives, nurses, and physicians who are providing obstetrical care. OUTCOMES: The outcomes considered were neonatal GBS disease, preterm birth, pyelonephritis, chorioamnionitis, and recurrence of GBS colonization. EVIDENCE: Medline, PubMed, and the Cochrane database were searched for articles published in English to December 2010 on the topic of GBS bacteriuria in pregnancy...
February 2018: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada: JOGC, Journal D'obstétrique et Gynécologie du Canada: JOGC
Louise Emilsson, Benjamin Lebwohl, Peter Hr Green, Joseph A Murray, Karl Mårild, Jonas F Ludvigsson
Background: Patients with celiac disease (CD) are at increased risk of certain infections, but it is unknown if mucosal healing influences this risk. Methods: We collected data on 29,096 individuals with CD (equal to villous atrophy) through Sweden's 28 pathology departments undergoing biopsy 1969-2008. Through the Swedish Patient Register we obtained information on any infection and specifically sepsis, streptococcal infection, influenza, Clostridium difficile , herpes zoster and pneumococcal infection up until December 2009...
February 2018: United European Gastroenterology Journal
Thea Brennan-Krohn, Al Ozonoff, Thomas J Sandora
BACKGROUND: Group A streptococcus (GAS) is the most common bacterial etiology of pharyngitis but is difficult to distinguish clinically from viral pharyngitis. There are benefits to early antibacterial treatment of GAS pharyngitis, but administering antibiotics to children with viral pharyngitis is ineffective and costly. We evaluated adherence to guidelines that were developed to help clinicians distinguish between viral and GAS pharyngitis and guide management. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of patients ages 3-18 who had a rapid streptococcal test and/or throat culture performed in an outpatient setting...
February 9, 2018: BMC Pediatrics
Monika Wojtera, Horace Cheng, Kyle Fiorini, Kevin Coughlin, Michelle Barton, Julie Strychowsky
BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding approaches to infantile group B streptococcal (GBS) head and neck cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis. We present a case of GBS necrotizing cellulitis and summarizes the literature regarding the presentation and management of infantile head and neck GBS cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis. METHODS: The literature was searched using PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and Medline (inception to April 2017) by two independent review authors...
February 7, 2018: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"