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Group a streptococcal

Morven S Edwards, Marcia A Rench, C Daniela Rinaudo, Monica Fabbrini, Giovanna Tuscano, Giada Buffi, Erika Bartolini, Stefano Bonacci, Carol J Baker, Immaculada Margarit
Immunization of nonpregnant adults could help prevent invasive group B Streptococcus (GBS) infections, but adult immune responses have not been investigated. We defined capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and pilus island (PI) surface antigen distribution and expression and immune responses to GBS infection in nonpregnant adults. Prospective surveillance from 7 hospitals in Houston, Texas, USA, identified 102 adults with GBS bacteremia; 43% had skin/soft tissue infection, 16% bacteremia without focus, and 12% osteomyelitis...
November 2016: Emerging Infectious Diseases
Corinne Ruppen, Laurent Decosterd, Parham Sendi
BACKGROUND: According to expert opinions, gentamicin should be administered as an adjunct to penicillin against severe group B streptococcal (GBS) infections. Whether the adjunct is important is of particular interest for elderly patients. Not only is the risk of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity higher in elderly persons, but their immune defence to bacterial infections may also be impaired. METHOD: Time-kill assays with human blood products, such as serum, neutrophilic granulocytes (opsonophagocytic assays) and whole blood from healthy, elderly volunteers were performed to evaluate the effect of gentamicin in combination with penicillin...
October 21, 2016: Infectious Diseases
Adam W Bartlett, Ben Smith, C R Robert George, Brendan McMullan, Alison Kesson, Monica M Lahra, Dip Paed, Pamela Palasanthiran
BACKGROUND: Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a recognized cause of sepsis and meningitis, particularly in infants. Early onset (<7 days) GBS disease has been well characterized, whereas the epidemiology of late onset disease (LOD, 7-89 days) and very late onset disease (VLOD, ≥90 days) is less well understood. The aims of this study were to assess risk factors, presentation, management, and outcome for GBS LOD and VLOD. METHODS: Microbiology laboratory databases and hospital diagnostic coding for Sydney Children's Hospital and the Children's Hospital at Westmead were investigated for patients ≥ 7 days of age diagnosed with GBS bloodstream infection or meningitis from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2014 (15 years)...
October 3, 2016: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
E Fiaux, M Titecat, O Robineau, J Lora-Tamayo, Y El Samad, M Etienne, N Frebourg, N Blondiaux, B Brunschweiler, F Dujardin, E Beltrand, C Loiez, V Cattoir, J P Canarelli, C Hulet, M Valette, S Nguyen, F Caron, H Migaud, E Senneville
BACKGROUND: Outcome of patients with streptococcal prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) is not well known. METHODS: We performed a retrospective multicenter cohort study that involved patients with total hip/knee prosthetic joint (THP/TKP) infections due to Streptococcus spp. from 2001 through 2009. RESULTS: Ninety-five streptococcal PJI episodes (50 THP and 45 TKP) in 87 patients of mean age 69.1 ± 13.7 years met the inclusion criteria...
October 13, 2016: BMC Infectious Diseases
Deborah A Williamson, Pierre R Smeesters, Andrew C Steer, Julie Morgan, Mark Davies, Philip Carter, Arlo Upton, Stephen Y C Tong, John Fraser, Nicole J Moreland
BACKGROUND: Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are responsible for a significant disease burden amongst Māori and Pacific populations in New Zealand (NZ). However, contemporary data are lacking regarding circulating group A Streptococcal (GAS) strains in NZ. Such information is important in guiding vaccine development. METHODS: GAS isolates from April to June 2015 were recovered from skin and pharyngeal samples from children living in areas of high social deprivation in Auckland, NZ, a significant proportion of which are Māori or Pacific...
October 12, 2016: BMC Infectious Diseases
Vanessa Poliquin, Elissa Cohen, Philippe Guillaume Poliquin, Carol Schneider, Savas Menticoglou
OBJECTIVE: We reviewed cases of group B Streptococcus (GBS) sepsis in term infants at our institution to identify areas for potential prevention. METHODS: We identified cases by searching our institution's microbiology databases for all positive GBS blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures taken from infants between 2008 and 2013. Patients were included if the timing of the positive culture met the criteria for early-onset GBS disease (age 7 days or under). Charts that met inclusion criteria were abstracted for details related to antepartum screening, intrapartum care, and postpartum outcome...
October 2016: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada: JOGC, Journal D'obstétrique et Gynécologie du Canada: JOGC
Oddvar Oppegaard, Steinar Skrede, Haima Mylvaganam, Bård Reiakvam Kittang
BACKGROUND: Beta-haemolytic streptococci are important contributors to the global burden of osteoarticular infections (OAI). Knowledge on the disease traits specific for streptococcal OAI, however, remains scarce. We wished to explore temporal trends of OAI caused by Group A Streptococci (GAS), Group B Streptococci (GBS) and Group C and G Streptococci (GCGS), and furthermore, to describe the associated host and pathogen characteristics. METHODS: All cases of microbiologically verified β-haemolytic streptococcal OAI in Health Region Bergen, Norway, in the period 1999-2013 were retrospectively identified...
October 4, 2016: BMC Infectious Diseases
Fabian Lorenzo-Diaz, Cris Fernández-Lopez, Pierre-Emmanuel Douarre, Adrian Baez-Ortega, Carlos Flores, Philippe Glaser, Manuel Espinosa
Streptococcus agalactiae or Group B Streptococcus (GBS) are opportunistic bacteria that can cause lethal sepsis in children and immuno-compromised patients. Their genome is a reservoir of mobile genetic elements that can be horizontally transferred. Among them, integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) and the smaller integrative and mobilizable elements (IMEs) primarily reside in the bacterial chromosome, yet have the ability to be transferred between cells by conjugation. ICEs and IMEs are therefore a source of genetic variability that participates in the spread of antibiotic resistance...
October 2016: Open Biology
Nikolai Siemens, Bhavya Chakrakodi, Srikanth Mairpady Shambat, Marina Morgan, Helena Bergsten, Ole Hyldegaard, Steinar Skrede, Per Arnell, Martin B Madsen, Linda Johansson, Julius Juarez, Lidija Bosnjak, Matthias Mörgelin, Mattias Svensson, Anna Norrby-Teglund
Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus (GAS) is a life-threatening, rapidly progressing infection. At present, biofilm is not recognized as a potential problem in GAS necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI), as it is typically linked to chronic infections or associated with foreign devices. Here, we present a case of a previously healthy male presenting with NSTI caused by GAS. The infection persisted over 24 days, and the surgeon documented the presence of a "thick layer biofilm" in the fascia...
July 7, 2016: JCI Insight
Kyle A Williams, Susan E Swedo, Cristan A Farmer, Heidi Grantz, Paul J Grant, Precilla D'Souza, Rebecca Hommer, Liliya Katsovich, Robert A King, James F Leckman
OBJECTIVE: Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) are hypothesized to occur as a result of cross-reactive antibodies produced in response to group A streptococcal infections. Previous research suggests that immunomodulatory therapies, such as intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), may lead to rapid and sustained symptom improvement in patients with PANDAS. METHOD: A total of 35 children meeting criteria for PANDAS and moderate to severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) were enrolled in a randomized-entry, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 6-week trial of IVIG (1 g/kg/day on 2 consecutive days), followed by optional open-label treatment for nonresponders, with follow-up at 12 and 24 weeks...
October 2016: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Christina Clarke, Louise O'Connor, Heather Carré-Skinner, Olaf Piepenburg, Terry J Smith
BACKGROUND: Despite the implementation of prevention guidelines, group B Streptococcal (GBS) infection remains a leading cause of sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis, resulting in significant neonatal morbidity and mortality. Preventive approaches that identify women at risk of transmitting GBS have reduced the incidence of neonatal GBS disease, and dramatically decreased the associated mortality rates. However, there is an on-going requirement for a near-patient diagnostic test for GBS that can be carried out at the time of delivery, ideally in the labour ward setting, particularly for women of unknown GBS colonisation status at the time of delivery...
2016: BMC Microbiology
Christine M Clark, Colin Huntley, Michele M Carr
An unimmunized 19-month-old child presented with a retropharyngeal abscess and coincident varicella infection. The abscess resolved with operative drainage. This is the first published report of this connection, although varicella is known to be associated with abscesses in general. Practitioners should be aware that cervical abscesses may complicate varicella infections.
2016: Case Reports in Otolaryngology
Gordana Randjelovic, Suzana Otasevic, Snezana Mladenovic-Antic, Vesna Mladenovic, Radmila Radovanovic-Velickovic, Marina Randjelovic, Dragan Bogdanovic
BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes - group A Streptococcus [GAS]) is the etiological agent causing perineal infections in children: perianal infections, vulvovaginitis and balanitis. If it is not properly diagnosed and treated, it can persist for many months and can cause severe complications. Furthermore, the treatment with penicillin can be followed by failures and recurrences. METHODS: We report here the prevalence of S. pyogenes isolates from the genital tract specimens taken from girls (1692) with symptoms of vulvovaginitis and boys (52) with balanitis in the municipality of Nis, Southeast-Serbia (the Western Balkans) in a ten years period, and the analysis of isolates by seasonal distribution, patient age and sensitivity to bacitracin and antimicrobial drugs used in the treatment of streptococcal infections...
September 16, 2016: Pediatrics International: Official Journal of the Japan Pediatric Society
Vladislav Raclavsky, Radko Novotny, Lubomir Stary, Lucie Navratilova, Jaromir Zatloukal, Petr Jakubec, Martin Zapalka, Frantisek Kopriva, Vitezslav Kolek
Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) is a group of three streptococcal species (S. anginosus, intermedius and constellatus) that act as opportunist pathogens, among others in cystic fibrosis. Due to their fastidious character, they are both difficult to cultivate and to differentiate from less pathogenic streptococcal species, therefore being most probably underdiagnosed. Semi-selective McKay agar and NAS agar were developed to facilitate SMG recovery from clinical samples; however, direct comparison of recovery rates has not been published yet...
September 16, 2016: Folia Microbiologica
Beth A Bachert, Soo J Choi, Paul R LaSala, Tiffany I Harper, Dudley H McNitt, Dylan T Boehm, Clayton C Caswell, Pawel Ciborowski, Douglas R Keene, Anthony R Flores, James M Musser, Flavia Squeglia, Daniela Marasco, Rita Berisio, Slawomir Lukomski
The streptococcal collagen-like proteins 1 and 2 (Scl1 and Scl2) are major surface adhesins that are ubiquitous among group A Streptococcus (GAS). Invasive M3-type strains, however, have evolved two unique conserved features in the scl1 locus: (i) an IS1548 element insertion in the scl1 promoter region and (ii) a nonsense mutation within the scl1 coding sequence. The scl1 transcript is drastically reduced in M3-type GAS, contrasting with a high transcription level of scl1 allele in invasive M1-type GAS. This leads to a lack of Scl1 expression in M3 strains...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
Connie Zhang, Richard M Haber
Perineal streptococcal dermatitis (PSD) is largely known to be caused by group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus (GAS). We would like to bring cases of non-GAS PSD to the attention of dermatologists, as there are implications for workup and therapy. We report 3 pediatric cases of PSD: 1 caused by GAS, 1 caused by group B β-hemolytic Streptococcus (GBS), and 1 associated with group C β-hemolytic Streptococcus (GCS). GBS and GCS are very rarely reported in pediatric cases of PSD. The literature on non-GAS PSD is reviewed, which additionally revealed several instances of PSD caused by group G β-hemolytic Streptococcus (GGS) and Staphylococcus aureus GBS, GCS, GGS, and S aureus are significant causes of PSD to consider, particularly among adult patients, based on our encountered cases and the literature...
September 14, 2016: Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery
Alexa Dierig, Nicole Ritz, Uta Tacke, Ulrich Heininger
Osteoarticular infections in the newborn period are rare. A serious complication is paralysis of the affected extremity resulting from either pain or direct involvement of the nerve. We report a newborn with combined osteomyelitis and suppurative arthritis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes presenting with right brachial plexus palsy.
October 2016: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
P Zhu, Y Sun, S Zheng
Tricuspid valve endocarditis is mainly found in intravenous drug abusers, and with splenic infarction in obstetric and gynaecologic practice is rare. We report the case of a 37-year-old woman with tricuspid infective endocarditis and splenic infarction after an elective abortion. The infected tricuspid valve and infarcted spleen were removed at one-stage operation. Systemic circulation arterial embolism should be considered when treating patients with right-sided endocarditis and a history of obstetrical procedures...
February 18, 2016: West Indian Medical Journal
Shaolong Chen, Wenlong Xie, Kai Wu, Ping Li, Zhiqiang Ren, Lin Li, Yuan Yuan, Chunmao Zhang, Yuling Zheng, Qingyu Lv, Hua Jiang, Yongqiang Jiang
Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Mieke L van Driel, An Im De Sutter, Hilde Habraken, Sarah Thorning, Thierry Christiaens
BACKGROUND: Antibiotics provide only modest benefit in treating sore throat, although effectiveness increases in participants with positive throat swabs for group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (GABHS). It is unclear which antibiotic is the best choice if antibiotics are indicated. OBJECTIVES: To assess the evidence on the comparative efficacy of different antibiotics in: (a) alleviating symptoms (pain, fever); (b) shortening the duration of the illness; (c) preventing relapse; and (d) preventing complications (suppurative complications, acute rheumatic fever, post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis)...
September 11, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
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