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Functional neuroimaging

Sabine Peters, Jiska S Peper, Anna C K Van Duijvenvoorde, Barbara R Braams, Eveline A Crone
This study tested the relation between cortical-subcortical functional connectivity and alcohol consumption in adolescents using an accelerated longitudinal design, as well as normative developmental patterns for these measures. Participants between ages 8 and 27 completed resting-state neuroimaging scans at two time points separated by two years (N = 274 at T1, N = 231 at T2). In addition, participants between ages 12 and 27 reported on recent and lifetime alcohol use (N = 193 at T1, N = 244 at T2)...
October 23, 2016: Developmental Science
Elijah A Petter, Nicholas A Lusk, Germund Hesslow, Warren H Meck
The contributions of cortico-cerebellar and cortico-striatal circuits to timing and time perception have often been a point of contention. In this review we propose that the cerebellum principally functions to reduce variability, through the detection of stimulus onsets and the sub-division of longer durations, thus contributing to both sub-second and supra-second timing. This sensitivity of the cerebellum to stimulus dynamics and subsequent integration with motor control allows it to accurately measure intervals within a range of 100-2000ms...
October 20, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
A Montoya-Filardi, M Mazón
Recreational drug abuse represents a serious public health problem. Neuroimaging traditionally played a secondary role in this scenario, where it was limited to detecting acute vascular events. However, thanks to advances in knowledge about disease and in morphological and functional imaging techniques, radiologists have now become very important in the diagnosis of acute and chronic neurological complications of recreational drug abuse. The main complications are neurovascular disease, infection, toxicometabolic disorders, and brain atrophy...
October 20, 2016: Radiología
Manuel E Hernandez, Roee Holtzer, Gioella Chaparro, Kharine Jean, Julia M Balto, Brian M Sandroff, Meltem Izzetoglu, Robert W Motl
Mobility and cognitive impairments are common in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), and are expected to worsen with increasing age. However, no studies, to date, in part due to limitations of conventional neuroimaging methods, have examined changes in brain activation patterns during active locomotion in older patients with MS. This study used functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) to evaluate real-time neural activation differences in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) between middle-aged to older adults with MS and healthy controls during single (Normal Walk; NW) and dual-task (Walking While Talking; WWT) locomotion tasks...
November 15, 2016: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Mònica Giménez, Andrés Guinea-Izquierdo, Victoria Villalta-Gil, Ignacio Martínez-Zalacaín, Cinto Segalàs, Marta Subirà, Eva Real, Jesús Pujol, Ben J Harrison, Josep Maria Haro, Joao R Sato, Marcelo Q Hoexter, Narcís Cardoner, Pino Alonso, José Manuel Menchón, Carles Soriano-Mas
The extent of functional abnormalities in frontal-subcortical circuits in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is still unclear. Although neuroimaging studies, in general, and resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (rs-fMRI), in particular, have provided relevant information regarding such alterations, rs-fMRI studies have been typically limited to the analysis of between-region functional connectivity alterations at low-frequency signal fluctuations (i.e., <0.08 Hz). Conversely, the local attributes of Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signal across different frequency bands have been seldom studied, although they may provide valuable information...
October 22, 2016: Brain Imaging and Behavior
Yi-Shin Sheu, Susan M Courtney
Conflict between multiple sensory stimuli or potential motor responses is thought to be resolved via bias signals from prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, population codes in the PFC also represent abstract information, such as task rules. How is conflict between active abstract representations resolved? We used functional neuroimaging to investigate the mechanism responsible for resolving conflict between abstract representations of task rules. Participants performed two different tasks based on a cue. We manipulated the degree of conflict at the task-rule level by training participants to associate the color and shape dimensions of the cue with either the same task rule (congruent cues) or different ones (incongruent cues)...
October 1, 2016: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
Mark A Frye, Euijung Ryu, Malik Nassan, Gregory D Jenkins, Ana C Andreazza, Jared M Evans, Susan L McElroy, Devin Oglesbee, W Edward Highsmith, Joanna M Biernacka
Converging genetic, postmortem gene-expression, cellular, and neuroimaging data implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in bipolar disorder. This study was conducted to investigate whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups and single nucleotide variants (SNVs) are associated with sub-phenotypes of bipolar disorder. MtDNA from 224 patients with Bipolar I disorder (BPI) was sequenced, and association of sequence variations with 3 sub-phenotypes (psychosis, rapid cycling, and adolescent illness onset) was evaluated...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Psychiatric Research
Xintao Hu, Lei Guo, Junwei Han, Christine Cong Guo
Neural discrimination of auditory intensity is one of the fundamental questions in human auditory perception. Human neuroimaging studies have demonstrated specific neural activations during intensity discrimination tasks. The detailed functional anatomy, however, remains elusive. Most of the existing studies examined the entire auditory cortex as a whole, neglecting the potential functional differentiation within the auditory cortex. Moreover, these previous results based on controlled auditory stimuli might not necessarily extend to the neural mechanism of natural auditory processing...
October 21, 2016: Brain Structure & Function
H Moriah Sokolowski, Wim Fias, Ahmad Mousa, Daniel Ansari
In recent years, there has been substantial growth in neuroimaging studies investigating neural correlates of symbolic (e.g. Arabic numerals) and non-symbolic (e.g. dot arrays) number processing. However, it remains contested whether number is represented abstractly, or if number representations in the brain are format-dependent. In order to quantitatively evaluate available evidence, we used activation likelihood estimation (ALE) to conduct quantitative meta-analyses using 57 neuroimaging papers. Consistent with the existence of abstract representation of number in the brain, conjunction analyses revealed overlapping activation for symbolic and nonsymbolic numbers in frontal and parietal lobes...
October 18, 2016: NeuroImage
Chuanjun Zhuo, Jiajia Zhu, Chunli Wang, Hongru Qu, Xiaolei Ma, Wen Qin
Alterations in grey matter structure and functional connectivity (FC) are pathological features of major depressive disorder (MDD). However, the relationship between brain structural and functional impairments in MDD remains uncertain. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between alterations in grey matter volume (GMV) and resting-state global functional connectivity density (rs-gFCD) in MDD. Forty-five patients with MDD and 48 healthy controls underwent structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)...
October 20, 2016: Brain Imaging and Behavior
D D Correa, J C Root, M Kryza-Lacombe, M Mehta, S Karimi, M L Hensley, N Relkin
Women with ovarian cancer often undergo chemotherapy involving multiple agents. However, little is known about treatment-related central neurotoxicity in this population. The goal of this cross-sectional study was to assess brain structure and function and neurocognitive abilities in patients with ovarian cancer following first-line chemotherapy. Eighteen patients with ovarian, peritoneal and fallopian tube cancer and eighteen healthy controls matched for gender, age and education participated in the study...
October 20, 2016: Brain Imaging and Behavior
Maike C Herbort, Joram Soch, Torsten Wüstenberg, Kerstin Krauel, Maia Pujara, Michael Koenigs, Jürgen Gallinat, Henrik Walter, Stefan Roepke, Björn H Schott
Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) frequently exhibit impulsive behavior, and self-reported impulsivity is typically higher in BPD patients when compared to healthy controls. Previous functional neuroimaging studies have suggested a link between impulsivity, the ventral striatal response to reward anticipation, and prediction errors. Here we investigated the striatal neural response to monetary gain and loss anticipation and their relationship with impulsivity in 21 female BPD patients and 23 age-matched female healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)...
2016: NeuroImage: Clinical
Vera Dinkelacker, Sophie Dupont, Séverine Samson
The new classification of epilepsy stratifies the disease into an acute level, based on seizures, and an overarching chronic level of epileptic syndromes (Berg et al., 2010). In this new approach, seizures are considered either to originate and evolve in unilateral networks or to rapidly encompass both hemispheres. This concept extends the former vision of focal and generalized epilepsies to a genuine pathology of underlying networks. These key aspects of the new classification can be linked to the concept of cognitive curtailing in focal epilepsy...
October 17, 2016: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Svetlana A Dambinova, Joseph C Maroon, Alicia M Sufrinko, John David Mullins, Eugenia V Alexandrova, Alexander A Potapov
Concussion is a complex, heterogeneous process affecting the brain. Accurate assessment and diagnosis and appropriate management of concussion are essential to ensure that athletes do not prematurely return to play or others to work or active military duty, risking re-injury. To date, clinical diagnosis relies primarily on evaluating subjects for functional impairment using instruments that include neurocognitive testing, subjective symptom report, and neurobehavioral assessments, such as balance and vestibular-ocular reflex testing...
2016: Frontiers in Neurology
Kenny Skagerlund, Thomas Karlsson, Ulf Träff
Continuous dimensions, such as time, space, and numerosity, have been suggested to be subserved by common neurocognitive mechanisms. Neuroimaging studies that have investigated either one or two dimensions simultaneously have consistently identified neural correlates in the parietal cortex of the brain. However, studies investigating the degree of neural overlap across several dimensions are inconclusive, and it remains an open question whether a potential overlap can be conceptualized as a neurocognitive magnitude processing system...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Davide Zanchi, Anne Christin Meyer-Gerspach, Claudia Suenderhauf, Katharina Janach, Carel W le Roux, Sven Haller, Jürgen Drewe, Christoph Beglinger, Bettina K Wölnerhanssen, Stefan Borgwardt
Depending on their protein content, single meals can rapidly influence the uptake of amino acids into the brain and thereby modify brain functions. The current study investigates the effects of two different amino acids on the human gut-brain system, using a multimodal approach, integrating physiological and neuroimaging data. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, L-tryptophan, L-leucine, glucose and water were administered directly into the gut of 20 healthy subjects. Functional MRI (fMRI) in a resting state paradigm (RS), combined with the assessment of insulin and glucose blood concentration, was performed before and after treatment...
October 20, 2016: Scientific Reports
Tetsuya Iidaka
Humor perception is a ubiquitous phenomenon in human societies. In theories of humor perception, three factors, non-seriousness, social context, and incongruity, have been implicated in humor. In another theory, however, elaboration and reinterpretation of contexts are considered to play a role in eliciting humor. Although the neural correlates of humor appreciation have been investigated using neuroimaging methods, only a few studies have conducted such experiments under natural conditions. In the present study, two functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments, using a comedy movie as a stimulus, were conducted to investigate the neural correlates of humor under natural conditions...
October 18, 2016: Cerebral Cortex
Su Lui, Xiaohong Joe Zhou, John A Sweeney, Qiyong Gong
Unlike neurologic conditions, such as brain tumors, dementia, and stroke, the neural mechanisms for all psychiatric disorders remain unclear. A large body of research obtained with structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography/single photon emission computed tomography, and optical imaging has demonstrated regional and illness-specific brain changes at the onset of psychiatric disorders and in individuals at risk for such disorders. Many studies have shown that psychiatric medications induce specific measurable changes in brain anatomy and function that are related to clinical outcomes...
November 2016: Radiology
Geert-Jan Will, Eveline A Crone, Pol A C van Lier, Berna Güroğlu
Childhood peer acceptance is associated with high levels of prosocial behavior and advanced perspective taking skills. Yet, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these associations have not been studied. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study examined the neural correlates of sharing decisions in a group of adolescents who had a stable accepted status (n = 27) and a group who had a chronic rejected status (n = 19) across six elementary school grades. Both groups of adolescents played three allocation games in which they could share money with strangers with varying costs and profits to them and the other person...
October 17, 2016: Developmental Science
Tristram A Lett, Henrik Walter, Eva J Brandl
Genetic variation underlies both the response to antidepressant treatment and the occurrence of side effects. Over the past two decades, a number of pharmacogenetic variants, among these the SCL6A4, BDNF, FKBP5, GNB3, GRIK4, and ABCB1 genes, have come to the forefront in this regard. However, small effects sizes, mixed results in independent samples, and conflicting meta-analyses results led to inherent difficulties in the field of pharmacogenetics translating these findings into clinical practice. Nearly all antidepressant pharmacogenetic variants have potentially pleiotropic effects in which they are associated with major depressive disorder, intermediate phenotypes involved in emotional processes, and brain areas affected by antidepressant treatment...
October 17, 2016: CNS Drugs
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