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cognitive training

Marina Cujzek, Andrea Vranic
This research aimed at investigating the utility of a computerized version of a cognitively stimulating activity as a video game intervention for elderly. The study focused on the effect of a 6-week extensive practice intervention on aspects of cognitive functioning (vigilance, working memory (WM), inhibition, reasoning) of old-old participants (N = 29), randomly assigned to trained or active control group. The difference between groups was in the content of the extended video game practice - cognitively complex card game for trained and computerized version of a simple dice-game of chance for control participants...
October 24, 2016: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
Donald Glowinski, Fabrizio Bracco, Carlo Chiorri, Didier Grandjean
The present contribution provides readers from diverse fields of psychology with a new and comprehensive model for the understanding of the characteristics of music ensembles. The model is based on a novel heuristic approach whose key construct is resilience, intended here as the ability of a system to adapt to external perturbations and anticipate future events. The paper clarifies the specificity of music ensemble as an original social and creative activity, and how some mechanisms, at an individual (cognitive) and group (coordination) level, are enacted in a particular way that endows these groups with exceptional capacity for resilience...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Jairo N Fuertes, Arielle Toporovsky, Mariela Reyes, Jennifer Bennett Osborne
OBJECTIVE: This article discusses the physician-patient working alliance and reviews the empirical research that has been generated on the working alliance to date. METHODS: The paper presents a brief history of the study of the physician-patient relationship, and discusses constructs that have examined aspects of the relationship, such as empathy, trust, and shared decision-making. Lastly, a meta-analysis was conducted based on the seven empirical studies (a total N of 1023 patients) that have examined the physician-patient working alliance...
October 19, 2016: Patient Education and Counseling
Lynne E Angus, Tali Boritz, Emily Bryntwick, Naomi Carpenter, Christianne Macaulay, Jasmine Khattra
OBJECTIVE: Recent studies suggest that it is not simply the expression of emotion or emotional arousal in session that is important, but rather it is the reflective processing of emergent, adaptive emotions, arising in the context of personal storytelling and/or Emotion-Focused Therapy (EFT) interventions, that is associated with change. METHOD: To enhance narrative-emotion integration specifically in EFT, Angus and Greenberg originally identified a set of eight clinically derived narrative-emotion integration markers were originally identified for the implementation of process-guiding therapeutic responses...
October 24, 2016: Psychotherapy Research: Journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research
Stefanie Mache, Lisa Baresi, Monika Bernburg, Karin Vitzthum, David Groneberg
BACKGROUND: Dealing with work-related stress is highly prevalent for employees in Gynecology Medicine. Junior physicians, in particular, have to face high working demands and challenges while starting their medical career after graduation. Job resources (i.e., social support) and personal resources (coping skills) might reduce job strain. The evidence for supportive and effective mental health interventions for clinicians is limited. Offering psychosocial skill training for entrants in Gynecology Medicine is expected to be highly beneficial...
October 22, 2016: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Yi-Shin Sheu, Susan M Courtney
Conflict between multiple sensory stimuli or potential motor responses is thought to be resolved via bias signals from prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, population codes in the PFC also represent abstract information, such as task rules. How is conflict between active abstract representations resolved? We used functional neuroimaging to investigate the mechanism responsible for resolving conflict between abstract representations of task rules. Participants performed two different tasks based on a cue. We manipulated the degree of conflict at the task-rule level by training participants to associate the color and shape dimensions of the cue with either the same task rule (congruent cues) or different ones (incongruent cues)...
October 1, 2016: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
Ranmalee Eramudugolla, Jasmine Price, Sidhant Chopra, Xiaolan Li, Kaarin J Anstey
OBJECTIVES: To design a low-cost simulator-based driving assessment for older adults and to compare its validity with that of an on-road driving assessment and other measures of older driver risk. DESIGN: Cross-sectional observational study. SETTING: Canberra, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Older adult drivers (N = 47; aged 65-88, mean age 75.2). MEASUREMENTS: Error rate on a simulated drive with environment and scoring procedure matched to those of an on-road test...
October 22, 2016: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Yanna Si, Yuan Zhang, Liu Han, Lihai Chen, Yajie Xu, Fan Sun, Muhuo Ji, Jianjun Yang, Hongguang Bao
BACKGROUND: Previous studies showed that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits could be alleviated by dexmedetomidine in young animal subjects. In the current study, we examine whether dexmedetomidine could also alleviate isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits in senile animals. METHODS: Senile male C57BL/6 mice (20 months) received dexmedetomidine (50 μg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle 30 minutes prior to isoflurane exposure (1.3% for 4 h). Cognitive function was assessed 19 days later using a 5-day testing regimen with Morris water maze...
2016: PloS One
David Geard, Peter Reaburn, Amanda Rebar, Rylee Dionigi
Global population aging has raised academic interest in successful aging to a public policy priority. Currently there is no consensus regarding the definition of successful aging. However, a synthesis of research shows successful aging can be defined as a late-life process of change characterized by high physical, psychological, cognitive, and social functioning. Masters athletes systematically train for, and compete in, organized forms of team and individual sport specifically designed for older adults. Masters athletes are often proposed as exemplars of successful aging...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
Suhitha Veeravelli, Bijan Najafi, Ivan Marin, Fernando Blumenkron, Shannon Smith, Stephen A Klotz
Approximately 1.2 million people in the United States live with HIV infection. Medical advancements have increased the life expectancy and this cohort is aging. HIV-positive individuals have a high incidence of frailty (~20%) characterized by depression and sedentary behavior. Exercise would be healthy, but due to the frail status of many HIV-positive individuals, conventional exercise is too taxing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of a novel game-based training program (exergame) in ameliorating some aspects of frailty in HIV-infected individuals...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Maria Anderson, Feng Xu, Ming-Hsuan Ou-Yang, Judianne Davis, William E Van Nostrand, John K Robinson
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. Amyloid-β protein (Aβ) depositions in both the brain parenchyma and the cerebral vasculature are recognized as important pathological components that contribute to the cognitive impairments found in individuals with AD. Because pharmacological options have been minimally effective in treating cognitive impairment to date, interest in the development of preventative lifestyle intervention strategies has increased in the field...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Kurt K Hubbard, Diane Blyler
Research involving working memory has indicated that stress and anxiety compete for attentional resources when a person engages in attention-dependent cognitive processing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of perceived stress and state anxiety on working memory and academic performance among health science students and to explore whether the reduction of stress and anxiety was achieved through progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) training. A convenience sample of 128 graduate students participated in this study...
November 2016: American Journal of Occupational Therapy: Official Publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association
Rabeea'h W Aslam, Vickie Bates, Yenal Dundar, Juliet Hounsome, Marty Richardson, Ashma Krishan, Rumona Dickson, Angela Boland, Eleanor Kotas, Joanne Fisher, Sudip Sikdar, Louise Robinson
BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment is a growing public health concern, and is one of the most distinctive characteristics of all dementias. The timely recognition of dementia syndromes can be beneficial, as some causes of dementia are treatable and are fully or partially reversible. Several automated cognitive assessment tools for assessing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early dementia are now available. Proponents of these tests cite as benefits the tests' repeatability and robustness and the saving of clinicians' time...
October 2016: Health Technology Assessment: HTA
Donald J Viglione, Gregory J Meyer, Ana Cristina Resende, Claudia Pignolo
Learning to code the imagery, communication, and behavior associated with Rorschach responding is challenging. Although there is some survey research on graduate students' impressions of their Rorschach training, research has not identified which coding decisions students find to be the most problematic and time-consuming. We surveyed students to identify what they struggled with most when learning coding and to quantify how difficult it is to learn how to code. Participants (n = 191) from the United States, Brazil, Denmark, Israel, and Italy rated 57 aspects of coding using a 4-point scale that encompassed both the time required to code and the subjective difficulty of doing so...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Personality Assessment
Hyunju Cho, Seokjin Ryu, Jeeae Noh, Jongsun Lee
The present study examined the effectiveness of daily mindful breathing practices on test anxiety of university students. A total of 36 participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: a training mindful breathing condition (n = 12), a training cognitive reappraisal condition (contrast group, n = 12), and a non-training condition (control group, n = 12). Each of the participants trained by themselves for 6 days after they had taken one session of education for mindful or cognitive reappraisal practices...
2016: PloS One
Duk Hwan Kim, Soo Jung Park, Jae Hee Cheon, Tae Il Kim, Won Ho Kim, Sung Pil Hong
OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to determine whether a pre-training program influences the entire learning process and overall proficiency of colonoscopy during fellowship. METHODS: From March 2011 to February 2013, a total of 28 first-year gastrointestinal fellows were trained in colonoscopy at a single tertiary center. Before entering their fellowship training, all fellows were board certified in internal medicine, but had no experience performing a full colonoscopy...
2016: PloS One
Saeeda Khanum, Rubina Hanif, Elizabeth S Spelke, Ilaria Berteletti, Daniel C Hyde
Current theories of numerical cognition posit that uniquely human symbolic number abilities connect to an early developing cognitive system for representing approximate numerical magnitudes, the approximate number system (ANS). In support of this proposal, recent laboratory-based training experiments with U.S. children show enhanced performance on symbolic addition after brief practice comparing or adding arrays of dots without counting: tasks that engage the ANS. Here we explore the nature and generality of this effect through two brief training experiments...
2016: PloS One
Mary E W Dankbaar, Maartje Bakhuys Roozeboom, Esther A P B Oprins, Frans Rutten, Jeroen J G van Merrienboer, Jan L C M van Saase, Stephanie C E Schuit
INTRODUCTION: Training emergency care skills is critical for patient safety but cost intensive. Serious games have been proposed as an engaging self-directed learning tool for complex skills. The objective of this study was to compare the cognitive skills and motivation of medical residents who only used a course manual as preparation for classroom training on emergency care with residents who used an additional serious game. METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study with residents preparing for a rotation in the emergency department...
October 19, 2016: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
Xue-Yuan Li, Wei-Wei Men, Hua Zhu, Jian-Feng Lei, Fu-Xing Zuo, Zhan-Jing Wang, Zhao-Hui Zhu, Xin-Jie Bao, Ren-Zhi Wang
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1) transgenic (Tg) mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using (18)F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr)...
October 18, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Karen Schipper, Minne Bakker, Tineke Abma
PURPOSE: The aim of this article is to describe how fatigue affects the lives of people with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD), how they experience fatigue, and how they deal with it in order to attune rehabilitation care to patients' needs. METHOD: A qualitative study, consisting of 25 semistructured interviews with patients with FSHD and severe fatigue (as measured with the checklist individual strength (CIS) fatigue questionnaire), was conducted to gain insight into the experiences of patients with fatigue...
October 20, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
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