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Monocyte/macrophage cell therapy

Ruifang Zheng, George P Studzinski
Differentiation therapy can supplement the therapy of APL, but other subtypes of AML are treated principally with cytotoxic agents, with few lasting remissions. While the induction of monocyte followed by macrophage differentiation by vitamin D derivatives (VDDs) is dramatic in cultured AML cells of all subtypes, attempts to translate this to the clinic have not been effective. Thus, better understanding of the mechanisms underlying VDD-induced differentiation may improve this approach. The key events in this form of differentiation include increased expression of CD11b, and the transcription factor PU...
October 17, 2016: Leukemia & Lymphoma
Jennifer L Gori, Jason M Butler, Balvir Kunar, Michael G Poulos, Michael Ginsberg, Daniel J Nolan, Zachary K Norgaard, Jennifer E Adair, Shahin Rafii, Hans-Peter Kiem
: : Successful expansion of bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) would benefit many HSPC transplantation and gene therapy/editing applications. However, current expansion technologies have been limited by a loss of multipotency and self-renewal properties ex vivo. We hypothesized that an ex vivo vascular niche would provide prohematopoietic signals to expand HSPCs while maintaining multipotency and self-renewal. To test this hypothesis, BM autologous CD34(+) cells were expanded in endothelial cell (EC) coculture and transplanted in nonhuman primates...
October 14, 2016: Stem Cells Translational Medicine
Christian Wächter, Lee E Eiden, Nedye Naumann, Candan Depboylu, Eberhard Weihe
BACKGROUND: The majority of investigations on HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) neglect the cerebellum in spite of emerging evidence for its role in higher cognitive functions and dysfunctions in common neurodegenerative diseases. METHODS: We systematically investigated the molecular and cellular responses of the cerebellum as contributors to lentiviral infection-induced neurodegeneration, in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaque model for HIV infection and HAND...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Neuroinflammation
Filip K Swirski, Matthias Nahrendorf, Peter Libby
Inflammation furnishes a series of pathogenic pathways that couple the risk factors for atherosclerosis with altered behavior of the intrinsic cells of the arterial wall, endothelium, and smooth muscle and promote the disease and its complications. Myeloid cells participate critically in all phases of atherosclerosis from initiation through progression, and ultimately the thrombotic consequences of this disease. Foam cells, lipid-laden macrophages, constitute the hallmark of atheromata. Much of the recent expansion in knowledge of the roles of myeloid cells in atherosclerosis revolves around the functional contributions of subsets of monocytes, precursors of macrophages, the most abundant myeloid cells in the atheroma...
August 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
Timothy M Williams, Andrea F Wise, Daniel S Layton, Sharon D Ricardo
BACKGROUND AND AIM: Kidney ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury is characterised by tubular epithelial cell (TEC) death and an inflammatory response involving cytokine production and immune cell infiltration. In various kidney diseases, increased macrophage numbers correlate with injury severity and poor prognosis. However, macrophage plasticity enables a diverse range of functions, including wound healing, making them a key target for novel therapies. This study aimed to comprehensively characterise the changes in myeloid and epithelial cells and the production of cytokines throughout the experimental IR model of acute kidney injury to aid in the identification of targets to promote and enhance kidney regeneration and repair...
October 1, 2016: Nephrology
Genki Suenaga, Tokunori Ikeda, Yoshihiro Komohara, Koutaro Takamatsu, Tatsuyuki Kakuma, Masayoshi Tasaki, Yohei Misumi, Mitsuharu Ueda, Takaaki Ito, Satoru Senju, Yukio Ando
We hypothesized that tissue-resident macrophages in familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) patients will exhibit qualitative or quantitative abnormalities, that may accelerate transthyretin (TTR)-derived amyloid deposition. To evaluate this, we examined the number and subset of tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue from amyloid-deposited FAP and control patients. In both FAP and control patients, tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue were all Iba+/CD163+/CD206+ macrophages. However, the number of macrophages was significantly decreased in FAP patients compared with control patients...
2016: PloS One
Yianzhu Liu, Wenhao Chen, Chenglin Wu, Laurie J Minze, Jacek Z Kubiak, Xian C Li, Malgorzata Kloc, Rafik M Ghobrial
BACKGROUND: The cellular and molecular mechanisms of chronic rejection of transplanted organs remain obscure; however, macrophages are known to play a critical role in the injury and repair of allografts. Among multiple factors influencing macrophage infiltration to allografts, the fractalkine chemokine (C-X3-C motif) ligand 1(CX3CL1)/chemokine (C-X3-C motif) receptor 1 (CX3CR1) signaling pathway and actin cytoskeleton, which is regulated by a small guanosine-5׳-triphosphatase Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA), are of the utmost importance...
August 20, 2016: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Rafael Escate, Teresa Padro, Maria Borrell-Pages, Rosa Suades, Rosa Aledo, Pedro Mata, Lina Badimon
Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a major risk for premature coronary heart disease due to severe long-life exposure to high LDL levels. Accumulation of LDL in the vascular wall triggers atherosclerosis with activation of the innate immunity system. Here, we have investigated (i) gene expression of LDLR and LRPs in peripheral blood cells (PBLs) and in differentiated macrophages of young FH-patients; and (ii) whether macrophage from FH patients have a differential response when exposed to high levels of atherogenic LDL...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Alberto Baroja-Mazo, Beatriz Revilla-Nuin, Pascual Parrilla, Laura Martínez-Alarcón, Pablo Ramírez, José Antonio Pons
Transplantation is the optimal treatment for end-stage organ failure, and modern immunosuppression has allowed important progress in short-term outcomes. However, immunosuppression poorly influences chronic rejection and elicits chronic toxicity in current clinical practice. Thus, a major goal in transplantation is to understand and induce tolerance. It is well established that human regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3 play important roles in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and immune homeostasis...
September 14, 2016: World Journal of Gastroenterology: WJG
J I Yongjia, L U Hongzhou
With extended life of HIV-infected patients due to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), the rate of HIV associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remains high and attracts much attention. The evidence is clear that cytokines are elevated in the blood of patients with HIV infection, which contribute to elevating the permeability of blood-brain barrier. Benefiting from that, cells in the brain are infected with HIV that has accelerated through the blood-brain barrier both as cell-free virus and infected immune cells including monocytes and T cells...
May 25, 2016: Zhejiang da Xue Xue Bao. Yi Xue Ban, Journal of Zhejiang University. Medical Sciences
Alejandra Gutiérrez-González, Mónica Martínez-Moreno, Rafael Samaniego, Noemí Arellano-Sánchez, Laura Salinas-Muñoz, Miguel Relloso, Antonio Valeri, Joaquín Martínez-López, Ángel L Corbí, Andrés Hidalgo, Ángeles García-Pardo, Joaquín Teixidó, Paloma Sánchez-Mateos
Tumor associated macrophages (TAM) are important components of the multiple myeloma (MM) microenvironment that support malignant plasma cell survival and resistance to therapy. It has been proposed that macrophages (MØ) retain the capacity to change in response to stimuli that can restore their antitumor functions. Here we investigated several approaches to reprogram MØ as a novel therapeutic strategy in MM. First, we found tumor-limiting and tumor-supporting capabilities for monocyte-derived M1-like MØ and M2-like MØ, respectively, when mixed with MM cells, both in vitro and in vivo...
September 13, 2016: Blood
Yosuke Kanno, Akira Ishisaki, Mei Miyashita, Osamu Matsuo
INTRODUCTION: Chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis, cause the bone destruction by promotion of the differentiation of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells into mature osteoclasts (OCs) with active bone-resorbing character. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying this disorder remain unclear. We herein investigated the role of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in the bone destruction caused by chronic inflammation. METHODS: We investigated that the effect of uPAR on inflammatory OC formation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in inflammatory diseases...
September 2016: Immunity, Inflammation and Disease
Chao Shen, Ming-Tai Chen, Xin-Hua Zhang, Xiao-Lin Yin, Hong-Mei Ning, Rui Su, Hai-Shuang Lin, Li Song, Fang Wang, Yan-Ni Ma, Hua-Lu Zhao, Jia Yu, Jun-Wu Zhang
MicroRNA-22 (miR-22) is emerging as a critical regulator in organ development and various cancers. However, its role in normal hematopoiesis and leukaemogenesis remains unclear. Here, we detected its increased expression during monocyte/macrophage differentiation of HL-60, THP1 cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, and confirmed that PU.1, a key transcriptional factor for monocyte/macrophage differentiation, is responsible for transcriptional activation of miR-22 during the differentiation. By gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrated that miR-22 promoted monocyte/macrophage differentiation, and MECOM (EVI1) mRNA is a direct target of miR-22 and MECOM (EVI1) functions as a negative regulator in the differentiation...
September 2016: PLoS Genetics
A de Mingo Pulido, B Ruffell
Metastatic disease is the major cause of fatalities in cancer patients, but few therapies are designed to target the metastatic process. Cancer cells must perform a number of steps to successfully establish metastatic foci, including local invasion, intravasation, survival, extravasation, and growth in ectopic tissue. Due to the nonrandom distribution of metastasis, it has long been recognized that the tissue microenvironment must be an important determinant of colonization. More recently it has been established in animal models that immune cells regulate the metastatic process, including a dominant role for monocytes and macrophages, and emerging roles for neutrophils and various lymphocyte populations...
2016: Advances in Cancer Research
Jingxian Ding, Chungen Guo, Pinghua Hu, Jun Chen, Qiuming Liu, Xiaobo Wu, Yali Cao, Jiong Wu
Despite the great progress in breast cancer research and treatment, measures for efficient targeting of triple‑negative breast cancer (TNBC) are still lacking. The well‑established dependency of cancer cells on their microenvironment suggests that targeting the tumor niche might form a novel therapeutic approach. We identified the tumor‑associated macrophage (TAM) infiltration in breast cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry, and analyzed overall survival (OS). U937 co‑cultures with MDA‑MB‑231, MDA‑MB‑468 and MCF‑7, respectively, to simulate in vivo cellular interactions were assessed...
September 6, 2016: International Journal of Oncology
Koen M Marien, Valerie Croons, Yannick Waumans, Ellen Sluydts, Stefanie De Schepper, Luc Andries, Wim Waelput, Erik Fransen, Peter B Vermeulen, Mark M Kockx, Guido R Y De Meyer
Despite all efforts made to develop predictive biomarkers for antiangiogenic therapies, no unambiguous markers have been identified so far. This is due to among others the lack of standardized tests. This study presents an improved microvessel density quantification method in tumor tissue based on stereological principles and using whole-slide images. Vessels in tissue sections of different cancer types were stained for CD31 by an automated and validated immunohistochemical staining method. The stained slides were digitized with a digital slide scanner...
2016: PloS One
Tsuyoshi Matsuura, Shizuko Ichinose, Masako Akiyama, Yuki Kasahara, Noriko Tachikawa, Ken-Ichi Nakahama
The trigger for bone remodeling is bone resorption by osteoclasts. Osteoclast differentiation only occurs on the old bone, which needs to be repaired under physiological conditions. However, uncontrolled bone resorption is often observed in pro-inflammatory bone diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Mature osteoclasts are multinuclear cells that differentiate from monocyte/macrophage lineage cells by cell fusion. Although Osteoclast precursors should migrate across osteoblast layer to reach bone matrix before maturation, the underlying mechanisms have not yet been elucidated in detail...
August 31, 2016: Journal of Cellular Physiology
O Ige, V F Edem, O G Arinola
Tuberculosis(TB)-specific host biomarkers for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment response have been identified as priorities for TB research. Macrophage and T cell lymphocytes play vital roles in Mycobacterium tuberculosis immune response and their associated biomarkers could form good candidates for diagnosis and treatment monitoring. The enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) is produced mainly by monocytes and macrophages and increase in biological fluids in the course of infection with microorganisms infecting macrophages...
2016: Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences: Official Publication of the Physiological Society of Nigeria
Runze Yang, Susobhan Sarkar, Daniel J Korchinski, Ying Wu, V Wee Yong, Jeff F Dunn
BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive brain cancer with a poor prognosis. The use of immune therapies to treat GBM has become a promising avenue of research. It was shown that amphotericin B (Amp B) can stimulate the innate immune system and suppress the growth of brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs). However, it is not feasible to use histopathology to determine immune activation in patients. We developed an MRI technique that can rapidly detect a therapeutic response in animals treated with drugs that stimulate innate immunity...
August 29, 2016: Neuro-oncology
T L Hartman, L Yang, A N Helfrick, M Hassink, N I Shank, K George Rosenker, M T Scerba, M Saha, E Hughes, A Q Wang, X Xu, P Gupta, R W Buckheit, D H Appella
Although the effective use of highly active antiretroviral therapy results in the suppression of virus production in infected individuals, it does not eliminate the infection and low level virus production in cells harboring virus in sanctuary sites. Thus, the continued search for new antiretroviral agents with unique and different mechanisms of HIV inhibition remains critical, and compounds that can reduce the level of virus production from cells already infected with HIV, as opposed to preventing de novo infection, would be of great benefit...
October 2016: Antiviral Research
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