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death dying and reflective practice

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29669455/third-year-nursing-students-lived-experience-of-caring-for-the-dying-a-hermeneutic-phenomenological-approach
#1
Kristen Ranse, Jamie Ranse, Mikayla Pelkowitz
BACKGROUND: In preparation for practice as a Registered Nurse, it is essential that students are equipped to care for the dying patient and their family. AIM: To explore nursing students' lived experience of caring for a dying patient and their family. DESIGN: Hermeneutic phenomenology. METHODS: Students who had cared for a dying patient in their final year of study were invited to participate in an interview. Participants' narratives (n = 6) were thematically analysed...
April 18, 2018: Contemporary Nurse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29428888/medical-provision-and-urban-rural-differences-in-maternal-mortality-in-late-nineteenth-century-scotland
#2
Alice Reid, Eilidh Garrett
This paper examines the effect of variable reporting and coding practices on the measurement of maternal mortality in urban and rural Scotland, 1861-1901, using recorded causes of death and women who died within six weeks of childbirth. This setting provides data (n = 604 maternal deaths) to compare maternal mortality identified by cause of death with maternal mortality identified by record linkage and to contrast urban and rural settings with different certification practices. We find that underreporting was most significant for indirect causes, and that indirect causes accounted for a high proportion of maternal mortality where the infectious disease load was high...
March 2018: Social Science & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29402110/addressing-the-cultural-spiritual-and-religious-perspectives-of-palliative-care
#3
Hodan Nalayeh
Healthcare services are often out of sync with cultural, spiritual and religious perspectives on health, death, and grieving. This dissonance affects attitudes and behaviours in seeking and utilizing end-of-life health services and can lead to poor clinical communication, misunderstanding, and anxiety as patients, families and health providers interact during a serious illness. To address a gap in cultural-specific information Canadian Virtual Hospice launched LivingMyCulture.ca-an evidence-informed collection of videos of immigrants, refugees, and Indigenous people sharing their stories about the intersection of culture, spirituality, and religion with their experiences of advanced illness, palliative care, and grief...
January 2018: Annals of Palliative Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29402097/lessons-we-are-learning-using-participatory-action-research-to-integrate-palliative-care-health-promotion-and-public-health-through-the-d%C3%A3-bra-research-program-in-sweden
#4
Carol Tishelman
Public health and health promotion approaches to end-of-life (EoL) research and care are still rare in Sweden. People remain generally ill-prepared for encounters with death and unable to advocate for quality EoL care; this may be reflected in Sweden's low scores for community engagement in the 2015 Quality of Death index. We have consolidated our endeavours into a cohesive national transdisciplinary research program, DöBra (a pun meaning both 'dying well' and 'awesome' in Swedish). In DöBra, we investigate how culture, the environment and conversation can promote constructive change and support better quality of life and death among the general population, in specific subgroups and in interventions directed to staff caring for dying individuals, their friends and families...
January 2018: Annals of Palliative Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29399904/privacy-at-end-of-life-in-icu-a-review-of-the-literature
#5
Fiona Timmins, Stelios Parissopoulos, Sotirios Plakas, Margaret T Naughton, Jan Ma de Vries, Georgia Fouka
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the issues surrounding privacy during death in ICU. BACKGROUND: While the provision of ICU care is vital, the nature and effect of the potential lack of privacy during death and dying in ICUs have not been extensively explored. DESIGN: A literature search using CINAHL and Pubmed revealed articles related to privacy, death and dying in ICU. METHOD: Keywords used in the search were "ICU," "Privacy," "Death" and "Dying...
February 5, 2018: Journal of Clinical Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29233318/a-course-for-developing-interprofessional-skills-in-pre-professional-honor-students-using-humanities-and-media
#6
Therese I Poirier, Connie Stamper-Carr, Kate Newman
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To design and implement an undergraduate honors course for pre-health professional students that develops interpersonal skills through use of a variety of humanities. EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY AND SETTING: A three credit hour course in an honors seminar sequence was developed by pharmacy practice faculty and with input from faculty in mass communications, philosophy, applied communication studies and history. The course utilized a variety of media such as literature, film, and podcasts to foster student discussion about a variety of health-related topics...
September 2017: Currents in Pharmacy Teaching & Learning
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29204655/blood-pressure-trajectories-in-the-20-years-before-death
#7
João Delgado, Kirsty Bowman, Alessandro Ble, Jane Masoli, Yang Han, William Henley, Scott Welsh, George A Kuchel, Luigi Ferrucci, David Melzer
Importance: There is mixed evidence that blood pressure (BP) stabilizes or decreases in later life. It is also unclear whether BP trajectories reflect advancing age, proximity to end of life, or selective survival of persons free from hypertension. Objective: To estimate individual patient BP for each of the 20 years before death and identify potential mechanisms that may explain trajectories. Design, Study, and Participants: We analyzed population-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink primary care and linked hospitalization electronic medical records from the United Kingdom, using retrospective cohort approaches with generalized linear mixed-effects modeling...
January 1, 2018: JAMA Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29133515/-rather-one-more-chemo-than-one-less%C3%A2-oncologists-and-oncology-nurses-reasons-for-aggressive-treatment-of-young-adults-with-advanced-cancer
#8
Katsiaryna Laryionava, Pia Heußner, Wolfgang Hiddemann, Eva C Winkler
BACKGROUND: Empirical research demonstrates that there is a tendency to administer tumor-directed therapy to patients with advanced cancer close to death, especially if they are young. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand oncologists' treatment decisions and oncology nurses' perception of these decisions in young adult patients and to investigate the extent to which young age was a factor in cancer treatment decisions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted 29 face-to-face interviews with oncologists and oncology nurses at the Department of Hematology and Oncology at the University Hospital in Munich, Germany...
February 2018: Oncologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28899296/caring-science-conscious-dying-an-emerging-metaparadigm
#9
William Rosa, Tarron Estes, Jean Watson
Caring science is an extant theory of human relationship, guiding the profession of nursing with the understanding and application of a moral-ethical praxis that promotes, protects, and provides human dignity throughout the life continuum. Over the past 30 or more years, caring science has transformed nursing by calling for a heightened ethical perspective of human dignity in how nurses practice, educate, research, and evolve the profession. Conscious dying is a framework rooted in a human caring ontology, which strives to deepen the nurse healer's awareness in tending to a patient's dying and death, returning death to its sacred place in the cycle of life...
January 2017: Nursing Science Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28756754/never-say-die-death-euphemisms-misunderstandings-and-their-implications-for-practice
#10
Deborah Rawlings, Jennifer J Tieman, Christine Sanderson, Deborah Parker, Lauren Miller-Lewis
BACKGROUND: A Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on death and dying was conducted to open the dialogue around death and dying. In one activity, participants were asked to engage with language and to think of alternative words (or euphemisms) that are used to describe death. AIM: To reflect from a nursing perspective how language enables and sometimes disguises important messages and conversations. METHODS: Four hundred and seventy one participants provided 3053 euphemisms...
July 2, 2017: International Journal of Palliative Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28748639/how-nurses-cope-with-patient-death-a-systematic-review-and-qualitative-meta-synthesis
#11
REVIEW
Ruishuang Zheng, Susan Fiona Lee, Melissa Jane Bloomer
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To review literature on nurses' coping strategies with patient death. BACKGROUND: Dealing with the loss of a patient was viewed as one of the most demanding and challenging encounters in clinical practice. Those nurses who are not competent in coping with patient death may be inadequate in supporting dying patients and their family members, and minimise the quality of end-of-life care. To get a broader understanding of how nurses cope with patient death and to develop meaningful and effective interventions, a systematic review which would help underpin the multidimensional approaches is needed...
January 2018: Journal of Clinical Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28673257/experiences-of-end-of-life-amongst-family-carers-of-people-with-advanced-dementia-longitudinal-cohort-study-with-mixed-methods
#12
Kirsten J Moore, Sarah Davis, Anna Gola, Jane Harrington, Nuriye Kupeli, Victoria Vickerstaff, Michael King, Gerard Leavey, Irwin Nazareth, Louise Jones, Elizabeth L Sampson
BACKGROUND: Many studies have examined the mental health of carers of people with dementia. Few have examined their experiences in the advanced stages of disease and into bereavement. We aimed to understand the experiences of carers during advanced dementia exploring the links between mental health and experiences of end of life care. METHODS: Mixed methods longitudinal cohort study. Thirty-five family carers of people with advanced dementia (6 at home, 29 in care homes) were recruited and assessed monthly for up to nine months or until the person with dementia died, then at two and seven months into bereavement...
July 3, 2017: BMC Geriatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28663341/determinants-of-hospital-death-in-haematological-cancers-findings-from-a-qualitative-study
#13
Dorothy McCaughan, Eve Roman, Alexandra G Smith, Anne Garry, Miriam Johnson, Russell Patmore, Martin Howard, Debra A Howell
OBJECTIVES: Current UK health policy promotes enabling people to die in a place they choose, which for most is home. Despite this, patients with haematological malignancies (leukaemias, lymphomas and myeloma) are more likely to die in hospital than those with other cancers, and this is often considered a reflection of poor quality end-of-life care. This study aimed to explore the experiences of clinicians and relatives to determine why hospital deaths predominate in these diseases. METHODS: The study was set within the Haematological Malignancy Research Network (HMRN-www...
March 2018: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28552003/-i-m-only-dealing-with-the-acute-issues-how-medical-ward-busyness-constrains-care-of-the-dying
#14
Lisa S Chan, Mary Ellen Macdonald, Franco A Carnevale, S Robin Cohen
Acute hospital units are a common location of death. Curative characteristics of the acute medical setting make it difficult to provide adequate palliative care; these characteristics include an orientation to life-prolonging treatment, an emphasis on routine or task-oriented care and a lack of priority on emotional engagement with patients. Indeed, research shows that dying patients in acute medical units often experience unmet needs at the end of life, including uncontrolled symptoms (e.g. pain, breathlessness), inadequate emotional support and poor communication...
May 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28386983/investigating-the-factors-that-affect-the-communication-of-death-related-bad-news-to-people-with-intellectual-disabilities-by-staff-in-residential-and-supported-living-services-an-interview-study
#15
I Tuffrey-Wijne, T Rose
BACKGROUND: Most staff working in intellectual disability services will be confronted with people with intellectual disabilities who need support around death, dying and bereavement. Previous studies suggest that intellectual disability staff tend to protect clients from knowing about death and avoid communication about death. The aims of this study were to gain further insight into the individual, organisational and contextual factors that affect the communication of death-related bad news to people with intellectual disabilities by intellectual disability staff and to develop guidelines for services to enable appropriate communication with clients about death and dying...
August 2017: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research: JIDR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324205/levels-of-intervention-how-are-they-used-in-quebec-hospitals
#16
Marjolaine Frenette, Jocelyne Saint-Arnaud, Karim Serri
In order to promote better practices and communication around end-of-life decision-making, several Canadian hospitals in the province of Quebec have developed a tool called "Levels of Intervention" (LOI). No work to date has been published demonstrating improvement since these forms were implemented. The purpose of the present study was to obtain information about the use of LOI forms across Quebec hospitals and to identify gaps in practice as well as areas for improvement. A retrospective study was undertaken of 299 charts of patients who had died in three Quebec hospitals with a LOI ordered...
June 2017: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100140/human-rights-and-dignity-behind-bars
#17
Tina Maschi, Marina Richter
Death and dying in prisons constitute a topic of growing importance across the globe. Based on the contributions made in this special issue, we reflect on current debates and outline recommendations for dialogue and practice. Scientific dialogue across the Atlantic, and across the globe, provides insights into different national carceral systems and their ways of dealing with end of life behind bars. At the same time, the comparison also helps to identify basic needs and practices that can work in various settings...
January 2017: Journal of Correctional Health Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27989403/-speaking-about-life-and-death-in-neonatology-how-can-communication-with-families-be-optimized
#18
T Pennaforte, A Moussa, A Janvier
Technological progress and improved clinical knowledge have increased survival of neonates who would previously have died. Survival is sometimes accompanied by a risk of short- or long-term adverse outcomes, which may lead to complex decisions about withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining interventions. These decisions are among the most difficult decisions in pediatric practice. They also involve communicating with parents and are emotionally charged. Many articles examining end-of-life decisions in neonatology state the need for healthcare providers to be caring, compassionate, and human without offering clear, practical advice...
February 2017: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27845612/between-east-and-west-a-diachronic-overview-of-finnish-death-culture
#19
Maija Butters
Finland holds a unique place in the geographical and cultural map of Europe by being situated between the East and the West. This article will offer a historical overview of Finland's death culture from the point of view of the various religious and ideological practices that reflect influence from these two sides. I also explore the factors that may explain the Lutheran Church's hegemony over death and dying in Finland.
January 2017: Death Studies
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27531449/advance-care-planning-in-norwegian-nursing-homes-who-is-it-for
#20
Lisbeth Thoresen, Rolf Ahlzén, Kari Nyheim Solbrække
Advance care planning (ACP) is an international concept for improving patient autonomy and communication in the context of anticipated deterioration and end-of-life care. In a preparatory conversation, health care professionals facilitate one or more conversations where nursing home residents are invited to reflect on, and articulate wishes and preferences concerning future medical treatment and end-of-life care. Our aim with this study was to increase knowledge of existing ACP practices in Norwegian nursing homes...
August 2016: Journal of Aging Studies
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