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"Recording experience"

Bao-Sen Shieh, Shih-Hsiung Liang, Yuh-Wen Chiu, Szu-Ying Lin
Most previous studies concerning avian adaptation to anthropogenic noise have focused on songbirds, but few have focused on non-songbirds commonly found in urban environments such as doves. We conducted field playback-recording experiments on the perch-coos of five dove species, including four native Taiwan species (the spotted dove, Spilopelia chinensis, the oriental turtle-dove, Streptopelia orientalis, the red collared-dove, Streptopelia tranquebarica, and the emerald dove, Chalcophaps indica) and one species not native to Taiwan (the zebra dove, Geopelia striata) to evaluate the detection and recognition of dove coos in habitats with differing levels of traffic noise...
2016: Scientific Reports
Yiming Chen, Yen-Chu Lin, Christopher A Zimmerman, Rachel A Essner, Zachary A Knight
The neural mechanisms underlying hunger are poorly understood. AgRP neurons are activated by energy deficit and promote voracious food consumption, suggesting these cells may supply the fundamental hunger drive that motivates feeding. However recent in vivo recording experiments revealed that AgRP neurons are inhibited within seconds by the sensory detection of food, raising the question of how these cells can promote feeding at all. Here we resolve this paradox by showing that brief optogenetic stimulation of AgRP neurons before food availability promotes intense appetitive and consummatory behaviors that persist for tens of minutes in the absence of continued AgRP neuron activation...
2016: ELife
Martha C Washington, Thaer R Mhalhal, Ayman I Sayegh
Two separate experiments were performed to localize the gastrointestinal sites of action regulating meal size (MS), intermeal interval (IMI) length and satiety ratio (SR, IMI/MS) by cholecystokinin (CCK) 8 and 33. Experiment 1: CCK-8 (0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.25nmol/kg) was infused in the celiac artery (CA, supplies stomach and upper duodenum) or the cranial mesenteric artery (CMA, supplies small and part of the large intestine) prior to the onset of the dark cycle in free feeding, male Sprague Dawley rats and MS (normal rat chow), IMI and SR were recorded...
September 2016: Hormones and Behavior
Jing Liu, Liping Pan, Xuanhong Cheng, Yevgeny Berdichevsky
Living slices of brain tissue are widely used to model brain processes in vitro. In addition to basic neurophysiology studies, brain slices are also extensively used for pharmacology, toxicology, and drug discovery research. In these experiments, high parallelism and throughput are critical. Capability to conduct long-term electrical recording experiments may also be necessary to address disease processes that require protein synthesis and neural circuit rewiring. We developed a novel perfused drop microfluidic device for use with long term cultures of brain slices (organotypic cultures)...
June 2016: Biomedical Microdevices
Yohannes Getiye, Tesfaye Tolessa, Ephrem Engidawork
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Calpurnia aurea (Ait.) Benth. subsp. aurea (CASA) (Fabaceae) seeds are used to treat hypertension in Ethiopian folklore medicine, particularly by Shinasha, Agew-awi and Amhara people in northwest Ethiopia. However, the claim has so far not been substantiated scientifically. AIM OF THE STUDY: The study was conducted to evaluate the antihypertensive activity of 80% methanol extract of CASA in animal model of hypertension as well as its vasorelaxant effect and possible underlying mechanisms in isolated guinea pig aorta...
August 2, 2016: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Kousha Azimi, Ian A Prescott, Robert A Marino, Andrew Winterborn, Ron Levy
BACKGROUND: We present a new halo technique for head fixation of non-human primates during electrophysiological recording experiments. Our aim was to build on previous halo designs in order to create a simple low profile system that provided long-term stability. NEW METHOD: Our design incorporates sharp skull pins that are directly threaded through a low set halo frame and are seated into implanted titanium foot plates on the skull. The inwardly directed skull pins provide an easily calibrated force against the skull...
August 1, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Methods
Kun-Ze Lee
Cervical spinal injury interrupts bulbospinal pathways and results in cessation of phrenic bursting ipsilateral to the lesion. The ipsilateral phrenic activity can partially recover over weeks to months post-injury due to the activation of latent crossed spinal pathways and exhibits a greater capacity to increase activity during respiratory challenges than the contralateral phrenic nerve. However, whether the bilateral phrenic nerves demonstrate differential responses to respiratory inhibitory inputs is unclear...
April 23, 2016: Journal of Physiology
Julie M Bugg, Michael K Scullin, Rachel S Rauvola
In young adults, it has been shown that prospective memory (PM) commission errors, the erroneous performance of a previously relevant intention, are less likely for repeatedly performed intentions (than never performed intentions). We examined whether this pattern holds for older adults, for whom impaired response inhibition processes might heighten risk of commission errors for repeatedly performed PM intentions. Older adults encoded a PM intention to press a key when a target word appeared during an ongoing lexical decision task...
June 2016: Psychology and Aging
Jie Chen, En-De Wu, Xin Chen, Lu-He Zhu, Xiaoman Li, Frank Thorn, Yuri Ostrovsky, Jia Qu
How we learn to interact with and understand our environment for the first time is an age-old philosophical question. Scientists have long sought to understand what is the origin of egocentric spatial localization and the perceptual integration of touch and visual information. It is difficult to study the beginnings of intermodal visual-motor and visual-tactile linkages in early infancy since infants' muscular strength and control cannot accurately guide visual-motor behavior and they do not concentrate well [1-6]...
April 25, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Natale Stucchi, Lisa Scocchia, Alessandro Carlini
How accurate are we in reproducing a point within a simple shape? This is the empirical question we addressed in this work. Participants were presented with a tiny disk embedded in an empty circle (Experiment 1 and 3) or in a square (Experiment 2). Shortly afterwards the disk vanished and they had to reproduce the previously seen disk position within the empty shape by means of the mouse cursor, as accurately as possible. Several loci inside each shape were tested. We found that the space delimited by a circle and by a square is not homogeneous and the observed distortion appears to be consistent across observers and specific for the two tested shapes...
2016: PloS One
Kyle J McCulloch, Daniel Osorio, Adriana D Briscoe
Intracellular recording is a powerful technique used to determine how a single cell may respond to a given stimulus. In vision research, intracellular recording has historically been a common technique used to study sensitivities of individual photoreceptor cells to different light stimuli that is still being used today. However, there remains a dearth of detailed methodology in the literature for researchers wishing to replicate intracellular recording experiments in the eye. Here we present the insect as a model for examining eye physiology more generally...
2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Wiktor S Phillips, Mikkel Herly, Christopher A Del Negro, Jens C Rekling
Study of acute brain stem slice preparations in vitro has advanced our understanding of the cellular and synaptic mechanisms of respiratory rhythm generation, but their inherent limitations preclude long-term manipulation and recording experiments. In the current study, we have developed an organotypic slice culture preparation containing the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), the core inspiratory rhythm generator of the ventrolateral brain stem. We measured bilateral synchronous network oscillations, using calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes, in both ventrolateral (presumably the preBötC) and dorsomedial regions of slice cultures at 7-43 days in vitro...
February 1, 2016: Journal of Neurophysiology
Guang-Wei Li, Yan Zhang, Yi-Ping Li, Jun-Xiang Wu, Xiang-Li Xu
Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) act in insect olfactory processes. OBPs are expressed in the olfactory organs and serve in binding and transport of hydrophobic odorants through the sensillum lymph to olfactory receptor neurons within the antennal sensilla. In this study, three OBP genes were cloned from the antennal transcriptome database of Grapholita molesta via reverse-transcription PCR. Recombinant GmolOBPs (rGmolOBPs) were expressed in a prokaryotic expression system and enriched via Ni ion affinity chromatography...
February 2016: Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology
Lei Liu, Jiani Xie, Ting Li, Hai-Chen Wu
We describe a protocol for the insertion of ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to form nanopores in a Montal-Mueller lipid bilayer. The SWCNTs are designed to bind to a specific analyte of interest; binding will result in the reduction of current in single-channel recording experiments. The first stage of the PROCEDURE is to cut and separate the SWCNTs. We cut long, purified SWCNTs with sonication in concentrated sulfuric acid/nitric acid (3/1). Isolation of ultrashort SWCNTs is carried out by size-exclusion HPLC separation...
November 2015: Nature Protocols
Sarah Patricia Slight, Eta S Berner, William Galanter, Stanley Huff, Bruce L Lambert, Carole Lannon, Christoph U Lehmann, Brian J McCourt, Michael McNamara, Nir Menachemi, Thomas H Payne, S Andrew Spooner, Gordon D Schiff, Tracy Y Wang, Ayse Akincigil, Stephen Crystal, Stephen P Fortmann, Meredith L Vandermeer, David W Bates
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2015: JMIR Medical Informatics
Sarah Patricia Slight, Eta S Berner, William Galanter, Stanley Huff, Bruce L Lambert, Carole Lannon, Christoph U Lehmann, Brian J McCourt, Michael McNamara, Nir Menachemi, Thomas H Payne, S Andrew Spooner, Gordon D Schiff, Tracy Y Wang, Ayse Akincigil, Stephen Crystal, Stephen P Fortmann, David W Bates
BACKGROUND: With the aim of improving health care processes through health information technology (HIT), the US government has promulgated requirements for "meaningful use" (MU) of electronic health records (EHRs) as a condition for providers receiving financial incentives for the adoption and use of these systems. Considerable uncertainty remains about the impact of these requirements on the effective application of EHR systems. OBJECTIVE: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)-sponsored Centers for Education and Research in Therapeutics (CERTs) critically examined the impact of the MU policy relating to the use of medications and jointly developed recommendations to help inform future HIT policy...
2015: JMIR Medical Informatics
Gabriel Gagnon-Turcotte, Alireza Avakh Kisomi, Reza Ameli, Charles-Olivier Dufresne Camaro, Yoan LeChasseur, Jean-Luc Néron, Paul Brule Bareil, Paul Fortier, Cyril Bories, Yves de Koninck, Benoit Gosselin
We present a small and lightweight fully wireless optogenetic headstage capable of optical neural stimulation and electrophysiological recording. The headstage is suitable for conducting experiments with small transgenic rodents, and features two implantable fiber-coupled light-emitting diode (LED) and two electrophysiological recording channels. This system is powered by a small lithium-ion battery and is entirely built using low-cost commercial off-the-shelf components for better flexibility, reduced development time and lower cost...
2015: Sensors
Christophe Petit, Bruno Le Ru, Stéphane Dupas, Brigitte Frérot, Peter Ahuya, Laure Kaiser-Arnauld, Myriam Harry, Paul-André Calatayud
In Lepidoptera, host plant selection is first conditioned by oviposition site preference of adult females followed by feeding site preference of larvae. Dietary experience to plant volatile cues can induce larval and adult host plant preference. We investigated how the parent's and self-experience induce host preference in adult females and larvae of three lepidopteran stem borer species with different host plant ranges, namely the polyphagous Sesamia nonagrioides, the oligophagous Busseola fusca and the monophagous Busseola nairobica, and whether this induction can be linked to a neurophysiological phenotypic plasticity...
2015: PloS One
Shingo Tanaka, Xiaochuan Pan, Mineki Oguchi, Jessica E Taylor, Masamichi Sakagami
In a complex and uncertain world, how do we select appropriate behavior? One possibility is that we choose actions that are highly reinforced by their probabilistic consequences (model-free processing). However, we may instead plan actions prior to their actual execution by predicting their consequences (model-based processing). It has been suggested that the brain contains multiple yet distinct systems involved in reward prediction. Several studies have tried to allocate model-free and model-based systems to the striatum and the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), respectively...
2015: Frontiers in Psychology
Pu Feng, Masafumi Jyotaki, Agnes Kim, Jinghua Chai, Nirvine Simon, Minliang Zhou, Alexander A Bachmanov, Liquan Huang, Hong Wang
Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli...
October 2015: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
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