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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095600/human-quarantine-toward-reducing-infectious-pressure-on-chimpanzees-at-the-ta%C3%A3-chimpanzee-project-c%C3%A3-te-d-ivoire
#1
Kim Grützmacher, Verena Keil, Vera Leinert, Floraine Leguillon, Arthur Henlin, Emmanuel Couacy-Hymann, Sophie Köndgen, Alexander Lang, Tobias Deschner, Roman M Wittig, Fabian H Leendertz
Due to their genetic relatedness, great apes are highly susceptible to common human respiratory pathogens. Although most respiratory pathogens, such as human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV), rarely cause severe disease in healthy human adults, they are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality in wild great apes habituated to humans for research or tourism. To prevent pathogen transmission, most great ape projects have established a set of hygiene measures ranging from keeping a specific distance, to the use of surgical masks and establishment of quarantines...
January 17, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095593/automated-face-detection-for-occurrence-and-occupancy-estimation-in-chimpanzees
#2
Anne-Sophie Crunchant, Monika Egerer, Alexander Loos, Tilo Burghardt, Klaus Zuberbühler, Katherine Corogenes, Vera Leinert, Lars Kulik, Hjalmar S Kühl
Surveying endangered species is necessary to evaluate conservation effectiveness. Camera trapping and biometric computer vision are recent technological advances. They have impacted on the methods applicable to field surveys and these methods have gained significant momentum over the last decade. Yet, most researchers inspect footage manually and few studies have used automated semantic processing of video trap data from the field. The particular aim of this study is to evaluate methods that incorporate automated face detection technology as an aid to estimate site use of two chimpanzee communities based on camera trapping...
January 17, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28081564/african-non-human-primates-host-diverse-enteroviruses
#3
Illich Manfred Mombo, Alexander N Lukashev, Tobias Bleicker, Sebastian Brünink, Nicolas Berthet, Gael D Maganga, Patrick Durand, Céline Arnathau, Larson Boundenga, Barthélémy Ngoubangoye, Vanina Boué, Florian Liégeois, Benjamin Ollomo, Franck Prugnolle, Jan Felix Drexler, Christian Drosten, François Renaud, Virginie Rougeron, Eric Leroy
Enteroviruses (EVs) belong to the family Picornaviridae and are responsible for mild to severe diseases in mammals including humans and non-human primates (NHP). Simian EVs were first discovered in the 1950s in the Old World Monkeys and recently in wild chimpanzee, gorilla and mandrill in Cameroon. In the present study, we screened by PCR EVs in 600 fecal samples of wild apes and monkeys that were collected at four sites in Gabon. A total of 32 samples were positive for EVs (25 from mandrills, 7 from chimpanzees, none from gorillas)...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077632/phyloepidemiological-analysis-reveals-that-viral-divergence-led-to-the-paucity-of-sivmus-gsn-mon-infections-in-wild-populations
#4
Fabian Schmidt, Florian Liegeois, Edward J D Greenwood, Matthew LeBreton, James Lester, Luc Deleplancque, Martine Peeters, Avelin Aghokeng, Ubald Tamoufe, Joseph L D Diffo, Jean M Takuo, Nathan D Wolfe, Eric Leroy, François Rouet, Jonathan L Heeney
: Human immunodeficiency virus subtype-1 (HIV-1) is the result of cross-species transmission of simian immunodeficiency virus from chimpanzees (SIVcpz). SIVcpz is a chimeric virus which shares common ancestors with viruses infecting red capped mangabeys and a subset of guenon species. The epidemiology of SIV infection in hominoids is characterized by low prevalence and uneven geographical distribution. Surveys in Cameroon indicated that two closely related members of the guenon species subset, mustached guenons and greater spot-nosed guenons, infected with SIVmus and SIVgsn respectively, have also low rates of SIV infections in their populations...
January 11, 2017: Journal of Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077068/structure-and-evolution-of-the-filaggrin-gene-repeated-region-in-primates
#5
Vanessa Romero, Kazuyoshi Hosomichi, Hirofumi Nakaoka, Hiroki Shibata, Ituro Inoue
BACKGROUND: The evolutionary dynamics of repeat sequences is quite complex, with some duplicates never having differentiated from each other. Two models can explain the complex evolutionary process for repeated genes-concerted and birth-and-death, of which the latter is driven by duplications maintained by selection. Copy number variations caused by random duplications and losses in repeat regions may modulate molecular pathways and therefore affect phenotypic characteristics in a population, resulting in individuals that are able to adapt to new environments...
January 11, 2017: BMC Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28065215/a-comparative-and-evolutionary-analysis-of-the-cultural-cognition-of-humans-and-other-apes
#6
Andrew Whiten
The comparative and evolutionary analysis of social learning and all manner of cultural processes has become a flourishing field. Applying the 'comparative method' to such phenomena allows us to exploit the good fortunate we have in being able to study them in satisfying detail in our living primate relatives, using the results to reconstruct the cultural cognition of the ancestral forms we share with these species. Here I offer an overview of principal discoveries in recent years, organized through a developing scheme that targets three main dimensions of culture: the patterning of culturally transmitted traditions in time and space; the underlying social learning processes; and the particular behavioral and psychological contents of cultures...
January 9, 2017: Spanish Journal of Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28056164/analysis-of-sea-almond-terminalia-catappa-cracking-sites-used-by-wild-burmese-long-tailed-macaques-macaca-fascicularis-aurea
#7
Tiago Falótico, Noemi Spagnoletti, Michael Haslam, Lydia V Luncz, Suchinda Malaivijitnond, Michael Gumert
Nut-cracking is shared by all non-human primate taxa that are known to habitually use percussive stone tools in the wild: robust capuchins (Sapajus spp.), western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus), and Burmese long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea). Despite opportunistically processing nuts, Burmese long-tailed macaques predominantly use stone tools to process mollusks in coastal environments. Here, we present the first comprehensive survey of sea almond (Terminalia catappa) nut-cracking sites created by macaques...
January 5, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28053161/getprime-2-0-gene-and-transcript-specific-qpcr-primers-for-13-species-including-polymorphisms
#8
Fabrice P A David, Jacques Rougemont, Bart Deplancke
GETPrime (http://bbcftools.epfl.ch/getprime) is a database with a web frontend providing gene- and transcript-specific, pre-computed qPCR primer pairs. The primers have been optimized for genome-wide specificity and for allowing the selective amplification of one or several splice variants of most known genes. To ease selection, primers have also been ranked according to defined criteria such as genome-wide specificity (with BLAST), amplicon size, and isoform coverage. Here, we report a major upgrade (2.0) of the database: eight new species (yeast, chicken, macaque, chimpanzee, rat, platypus, pufferfish, and Anolis carolinensis) now complement the five already included in the previous version (human, mouse, zebrafish, fly, and worm)...
January 4, 2017: Nucleic Acids Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28052920/evolution-of-transcript-modification-by-n6-methyladenosine-in-primates
#9
Lijia Ma, Boxuan Zhao, Kai Chen, Amber Thomas, Jigyasa H Tuteja, Xin He, Chuan He, Kevin White
Phenotypic differences within populations and between closely related species are often driven by variation and evolution of gene expression (King and Wilson 1975; Romero et al. 2012; Villar et al. 2014). However, most analyses have focused on the effects of genomic variation at cis-regulatory elements such as promoters and enhancers that control transcriptional activity, and little is understood about the influence of post-transcriptional processes on transcript evolution. Post-transcriptional modification of RNA by N6-methyladenosine (m6A) has been shown to be widespread throughout the transcriptome (Desrosiers et al...
January 4, 2017: Genome Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28051932/social-learning-and-culture-in-child-and-chimpanzee
#10
Andrew Whiten
A few decades ago, we knew next to nothing about the behavior of our closest animal relative, the chimpanzee, but long-term field studies have since revealed an undreamed-of richness in the diversity of their cultural traditions across Africa. These discoveries have been complemented by a substantial suite of experimental studies, now bridging to the wild through field experiments. These field and experimental studies, particularly those in which direct chimpanzee-child comparisons have been made, delineate a growing set of commonalities between the phenomena of social learning and culture in the lives of chimpanzees and humans...
January 3, 2017: Annual Review of Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28035660/morphological-integration-of-the-cranium-in-homo-pan-and-hylobates-and-the-evolution-of-hominoid-facial-structures
#11
Dimitri Neaux
OBJECTIVES: Modern humans diverge from other extant hominids (chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans) in a series of craniofacial morphological features. Like hylobatids, they possess a face with a reduced subnasal prognathism that is associated with a globular basicranium. These traits are not independent, as the skull is a complex integrated structure. The aim of the present study is to determine relationships between the face and the basicranium in two hominid genera (Homo and Pan) and a hylobatid genus (Hylobates) to test if these taxa share common patterns of integration linking these structures...
December 30, 2016: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28031267/assessment-of-the-plasmodium-falciparum-pre-erythrocytic-antigen-uis3-as-a-potential-candidate-for-a-malaria-vaccine
#12
Rhea J Longley, Benedict R Halbroth, Ahmed M Salman, Katie J Ewer, Susanne H Hodgson, Chris J Janse, Shahid M Khan, Adrian V S Hill, Alexandra J Spencer
Efforts are currently underway to improve the efficacy of sub-unit malaria vaccines through assessment of new adjuvants, vaccination platforms and antigens. In this study, we further assess the antigen P. falciparum (Pf) upregulated in infective sporozoites 3 (PfUIS3) as a vaccine candidate. PfUIS3 was expressed in the viral vectors chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) and used to immunize mice in a prime-boost regimen. We previously demonstrated that this regimen could provide partial protection against challenge with chimeric P...
December 28, 2016: Infection and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28028227/oxytocin-reactivity-during-intergroup-conflict-in-wild-chimpanzees
#13
Liran Samuni, Anna Preis, Roger Mundry, Tobias Deschner, Catherine Crockford, Roman M Wittig
Intergroup conflict is evident throughout the history of our species, ubiquitous across human societies, and considered crucial for the evolution of humans' large-scale cooperative nature. Like humans, chimpanzee societies exhibit intragroup coordination and coalitionary support during violent intergroup conflicts. In both species, cooperation among group members is essential for individuals to gain access to benefits from engaging in intergroup conflict. Studies suggest that a contributive mechanism regulating in-group cooperation during intergroup conflicts in humans involves the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin, known to influence trust, coordination, and social cognition, although evidence from natural settings is lacking...
December 27, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28027315/non-human-primate-schlafen11-inhibits-production-of-both-host-and-viral-proteins
#14
Alex C Stabell, John Hawkins, Manqing Li, Xia Gao, Michael David, William H Press, Sara L Sawyer
Schlafen11 (encoded by the SLFN11 gene) has been shown to inhibit the accumulation of HIV-1 proteins. We show that the SLFN11 gene is under positive selection in simian primates and is species-specific in its activity against HIV-1. The activity of human Schlafen11 is relatively weak compared to that of some other primate versions of this protein, with the versions encoded by chimpanzee, orangutan, gibbon, and marmoset being particularly potent inhibitors of HIV-1 protein production. Interestingly, we find that Schlafen11 is functional in the absence of infection and reduces protein production from certain non-viral (GFP) and even host (Vinculin and GAPDH) transcripts...
December 2016: PLoS Pathogens
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018647/alloparenting-is-associated-with-reduced-maternal-lactation-effort-and-faster-weaning-in-wild-chimpanzees
#15
Iulia Bădescu, David P Watts, M Anne Katzenberg, Daniel W Sellen
Alloparenting, when individuals other than the mother assist with infant care, can vary between and within populations and has potential fitness costs and benefits for individuals involved. We investigated the effects of alloparenting on the speed with which infants were weaned, a potential component of maternal fitness because of how it can affect inter-birth intervals, in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) at Ngogo, Uganda. We also provide, to our knowledge, the first description of alloparenting in this population and present a novel measure of the contribution of milk to infant diets through faecal stable nitrogen isotopes (δ(15)N)...
November 2016: Royal Society Open Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018626/chimpanzee-fathers-bias-their-behaviour-towards-their-offspring
#16
Carson M Murray, Margaret A Stanton, Elizabeth V Lonsdorf, Emily E Wroblewski, Anne E Pusey
Promiscuous mating was traditionally thought to curtail paternal investment owing to the potential costs of providing care to unrelated infants. However, mounting evidence suggests that males in some promiscuous species can recognize offspring. In primates, evidence for paternal care exists in promiscuous Cercopithecines, but less is known about these patterns in other taxa. Here, we examine two hypotheses for paternal associations with lactating mothers in eastern chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii): paternal effort, whereby males associate and interact more with their own infants, and mating effort, whereby males invest in mothers and offspring for mating privileges...
November 2016: Royal Society Open Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28010125/proposed-association-between-the-hexanucleotide-repeat-of-c9orf72-and-opposability-index-of-the-thumb
#17
Zhongbo Chen, Kuang Lin, Jeffrey D Macklis, Ammar Al-Chalabi
OBJECTIVE: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal disease caused by motor neuron and sub-cerebral projection neuron degeneration. We sought to explore the particular susceptibility of humans to neurodegeneration and whether any characteristic human features might predispose to selective vulnerability of the critical motor circuitry in ALS. The pathophysiology of the C9orf72 repeat is not yet understood, despite its role as a common cause of ALS and frontotemporal dementia. METHODS: We examined the development of the monosynaptic cortico-motoneuronal system, key to skilled hand movements, measured by the thumb opposability index, and its relationship to the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion, a strong predisposing factor for neurodegeneration, using the genomic tool BLAST...
December 23, 2016: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28004893/the-psychology-of-cooperation-insights-from-chimpanzees-and-children
#18
Alicia P Melis, Felix Warneken
Across all cultures, humans engage in cooperative activities that can be as simple as preparing a meal or sharing food with others and as complex as playing in an orchestra or donating to charity. Although intraspecific cooperation exists among many other animal species, only humans engage in such a wide array of cooperative interaction and participate in large-scale cooperation that extends beyond kin and even includes strangers.
November 2016: Evolutionary Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28003445/distance-decay-effect-in-stone-tool-transport-by-wild-chimpanzees
#19
Lydia V Luncz, Tomos Proffitt, Lars Kulik, Michael Haslam, Roman M Wittig
Stone tool transport leaves long-lasting behavioural evidence in the landscape. However, it remains unknown how large-scale patterns of stone distribution emerge through undirected, short-term transport behaviours. One of the longest studied groups of stone-tool-using primates are the chimpanzees of the Taï National Park in Ivory Coast, West Africa. Using hammerstones left behind at chimpanzee Panda nut-cracking sites, we tested for a distance-decay effect, in which the weight of material decreases with increasing distance from raw material sources...
December 28, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28003442/the-heritability-of-chimpanzee-and-human-brain-asymmetry
#20
Aida Gómez-Robles, William D Hopkins, Steven J Schapiro, Chet C Sherwood
Human brains are markedly asymmetric in structure and lateralized in function, which suggests a relationship between these two properties. The brains of other closely related primates, such as chimpanzees, show similar patterns of asymmetry, but to a lesser degree, indicating an increase in anatomical and functional asymmetry during hominin evolution. We analysed the heritability of cerebral asymmetry in chimpanzees and humans using classic morphometrics, geometric morphometrics, and quantitative genetic techniques...
December 28, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
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