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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28641322/scuba-diving-and-otology-a-systematic-review-with-recommendations-on-diagnosis-treatment-and-post-operative-care
#1
REVIEW
Devon M Livingstone, Kristine A Smith, Beth Lange
Scuba diving is a popular recreational and professional activity with inherent risks. Complications related to barotrauma and decompression illness can pose significant morbidity to a diver's hearing and balance systems. The majority of dive-related injuries affect the head and neck, particularly the outer, middle and inner ear. Given the high incidence of otologic complications from diving, an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of otic pathology is a necessity. We performed a systematic and comprehensive literature review including the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of otologic pathology related to diving...
June 2017: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28635658/asperentin-b-a-new-inhibitor-of-the-protein-tyrosine-phosphatase-1b
#2
Jutta Wiese, Hülya Aldemir, Rolf Schmaljohann, Tobias A M Gulder, Johannes F Imhoff
In the frame of studies on secondary metabolites produced by fungi from deep-sea environments we have investigated inhibitors of enzymes playing key roles in signaling cascades of biochemical pathways relevant for the treatment of diseases. Here we report on a new inhibitor of the human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a target in the signaling pathway of insulin. A new asperentin analog is produced by an Aspergillussydowii strain isolated from the sediment of the deep Mediterranean Sea. Asperentin B (1) contains an additional phenolic hydroxy function at C-6 and exhibits an IC50 value against PTP1B of 2 μM in vitro, which is six times stronger than the positive control, suramin...
June 21, 2017: Marine Drugs
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28590162/exercise-testing-supplemental-oxygen-and-hypoxia
#3
Susan A Ward, Michael Pw Grocott, Denny Zh Levett
Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in hyperoxia and hypoxia has several applications, stemming from characterization of abnormal physiological response profiles associated with exercise intolerance. As altered oxygenation can impact on the performance of gas-concentration and flow sensors and pulmonary gas exchange algorithms, integrated CPET system function requires validation under these conditions. Also, as oxygenation status can influence peak O2 uptake, care should be taken in the selection of work-rate incrementation rates when CPET performance is to be compared with sea-level...
June 7, 2017: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545324/postmortem-examination-of-australian-sea-snakes-hydrophiinae-anatomy-and-common-pathologic-conditions
#4
Amber K Gillett, Richard Ploeg, Mark Flint, Paul C Mills
There is limited published information about disease in wild sea snakes and no standardized guideline for postmortem examination of sea snakes. Identifying causes of morbidity and mortality of marine vertebrate species has been pivotal to understanding disease factors implicated in stranding events and assisting with the formulation of conservation plans. Additionally, postmortem findings can provide valuable information on life history traits and the ecology of these reclusive species. Sick, moribund, or dead sea snakes are intermittently washed ashore along Australian and international beaches and provide an opportunity to examine a subset of the population and identify causes of population decline...
May 1, 2017: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28531363/beneficial-effect-of-enriched-air-nitrox-on-bubble-formation-during-scuba-diving-an-open-water-study
#5
Anne-Kathrin Brebeck, Andreas Deussen, Ursula Range, Costantino Balestra, Sinclair Cleveland, Jochen D Schipke
Bubble formation during scuba diving might induce decompression sickness. This prospective randomised and double-blind study included 108 advanced recreational divers (38 females). Fifty-four pairs of divers, 1 breathing air and the other breathing nitrox28 undertook a standardised dive (24 ± 1 msw; 62 ± 5min) in the Red Sea. Venous gas bubbles were counted (Doppler) 30-<45 min (early) and 45-60 min (late) post-dive at jugular, subclavian and femoral sites. Only 7% (air) vs. 11% (air28®) (n.s.) were bubble-free after a dive...
May 21, 2017: Journal of Sports Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28474702/-hemoglobin-changes-hb-in-miners-exposed-to-high-altitude-and-associated-factors
#6
Christian R Mejia, Dante M Quiñones-Laveriano, Raúl Gomero, Luis Pérez-Pérez
AIM: To determine the variation of hemoglobin (Hb) in two groups of miners working at different altitudes. METHODOLOGY: A longitudinal study conducted in a private company. Hb was obtained from entrance exams and annual checks of workers at two locations: at sea level and at Peruvian highlands (4,100 m), taken by trained staff and equipment calibrated to environmental conditions. We analyzed variations in the course of the years with the PA-GEE statistical test; p values were obtained...
March 2017: Gaceta Médica de México
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28469847/response-to-letter-to-the-editor-regarding-acute-mountain-sickness-among-tourists-visiting-the-high-altitude-city-of-lhasa-tibet-china-at-3658%C3%A2-m-above-sea-level-a-cross-sectional-study
#7
Gonggalanzi, Per Nafstad
We kindly thank the journal for the opportunity to respond to the recent comments made regarding our manuscript entitled "Acute mountain sickness among tourists visiting the high-altitude city of Lhasa, Tibet, China at 3658 m above sea level: A cross-sectional study".
2017: Archives of Public Health, Archives Belges de Santé Publique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28439981/evolution-of-the-plasma-proteome-of-divers-before-and-after-a-single-scuba-dive
#8
Jacky Lautridou, Vianney Pichereau, Sébastien Artigaud, Benoit Bernay, Otto Barak, Ryan Hoiland, Andrew T Lovering, Ingrid Eftedal, Zeljko Dujic, François Guerrero
PURPOSE: Decompression sickness (DCS) is a poorly understood and complex systemic disease caused by inadequate desaturation following a reduction of ambient pressure. A previous proteomic study of ours showed that DCS occurrence but not diving was associated with changes in the plasma proteome in rats, including a dramatic decrease of abundance of the tetrameric form of Transthyretin (TTR). The present study aims to assess the impact on the human blood proteome of a dive inducing significant decompression stress but without inducing DCS symptoms...
April 25, 2017: Proteomics. Clinical Applications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421029/a-historical-view-of-motion-sickness-a-plague-at-sea-and-on-land-also-with-military-impact
#9
Doreen Huppert, Judy Benson, Thomas Brandt
Seasickness and its triggers, symptoms, and preventive measures were well known in antiquity. This chapter is based on an analysis of descriptions of motion sickness, in particular seasickness, in ancient Greek, Roman, and Chinese literature. A systematic search was made from the Greek period beginning with Homer in 800 BC to the late Roman period and ending with Aetios Amidenos in 600 AD, as well as in the Chinese medical classics dating from around 300 AD. Major aspects are the following: body movements caused by waves were identified in all cultures as the critical stimuli...
2017: Frontiers in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28394182/medex2015-greater-sea-level-fitness-is-associated-with-lower-sense-of-effort-during-himalayan-trekking-without-worse-acute-mountain-sickness
#10
Gabriella M K Rossetti, Jamie H Macdonald, Matthew Smith, Anna R Jackson, Nigel Callender, Hannah K Newcombe, Heather M Storey, Sebastian Willis, Jojanneke van den Beukel, Jonathan Woodward, James Pollard, Benjamin Wood, Victoria Newton, Jana Virian, Owen Haswell, Samuel J Oliver
Rossetti, Gabriella M.K., Jamie H. Macdonald, Matthew Smith, Anna R. Jackson, Nigel Callender, Hannah K. Newcombe, Heather M. Storey, Sebastian Willis, Jojanneke van den Beukel, Jonathan Woodward, James Pollard, Benjamin Wood, Victoria Newton, Jana Virian, Owen Haswell, and Samuel J. Oliver. MEDEX2015: Greater sea-level fitness is associated with lower sense of effort during Himalayan trekking without worse acute mountain sickness. High Alt Med Biol. 18:152-162, 2017.-This study examined the complex relationships of fitness and hypoxic sensitivity with submaximal exercise responses and acute mountain sickness (AMS) at altitude...
June 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28357819/a-comparative-evaluation-of-two-decompression-procedures-for-technical-diving-using-inflammatory-responses-compartmental-versus-ratio-deco
#11
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Enzo Spisni, Claudio Marabotti, Luigia De Fazio, Maria Chiara Valerii, Elena Cavazza, Stefano Brambilla, Klarida Hoxha, Antonio L'Abbate, Pasquale Longobardi
INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to compare two decompression procedures commonly adopted by technical divers: the ZH-L16 algorithm modified by 30/85 gradient factors (compartmental decompression model, CDM) versus the 'ratio decompression strategy' (RDS). The comparison was based on an analysis of changes in diver circulating inflammatory profiles caused by decompression from a single dive. METHODS: Fifty-one technical divers performed a single trimix dive to 50 metres' sea water (msw) for 25 minutes followed by enriched air (EAN50) and oxygen decompression...
March 2017: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28329216/heart-mechanics-at-high-altitude-6%C3%A2-days-on-the-top-of-europe
#12
Claire Maufrais, Thomas Rupp, Pierre Bouzat, Gregory Doucende, Samuel Verges, Stéphane Nottin, Guillaume Walther
Aims: The aim of this study was to analyse the underlying mechanisms of left and right ventricular (LV and RV) functional alterations during several days in high-altitude hypoxia. Methods and results: Resting evaluations of LV and RV function and mechanics were assessed by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography on 11 subjects at sea level (SLPRE), 3 ± 2 h after helicopter transport to high altitude (D0), at day 2 (D2), day 4 (D4) and day 6 (D6) at 4350 m and 5 ± 2 h after return to sea level (SLPOST)...
December 22, 2016: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323589/preventing-high-altitude-cerebral-edema-in-rats-with-repurposed-anti-angiogenesis-pharmacotherapy
#13
Samantha Tarshis, Joanne Maltzahn, Zoe Loomis, David C Irwin
BACKGROUND: High altitude cerebral edema (HACE) is a fulminant, deadly, and yet still unpredictable brain disease. A new prophylactic treatment for HACE and its predecessor, acute mountain sickness (AMS), needs to be developed without the contraindications or adverse effect profiles of acetazolamide and dexamethasone. Since neovascularization signals are likely key contributors to HACE/AMS, our approach was to examine already existing anti-angiogenic drugs to inhibit potential initiating HACE pathway(s)...
December 1, 2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251400/effects-of-rapid-ascent-on-the-heart-rate-variability-of-individuals-with-and-without-acute-mountain-sickness
#14
Ming Ling Yih, Fang-Chi Lin, Heng-Sheng Chao, Han-Chen Tsai, Shi-Chuan Chang
PURPOSE: Through time- and frequency-domain analysis, we compared the effects of acute hypobaric hypoxia on the changes in heart rate variability (HRV) following night sleeping and morning awakening in individuals with and without acute mountain sickness (AMS). METHOD: Thirty-nine nonacclimatised healthy individuals were transported by bus from sea level to 3150 m within 3 h. Short-term HRV was measured two times a day-before sleeping (BS) and after awakening (AA)- at 3 days before ascent (T0), two consecutive nights at 3150 m (T1 and T2), and 2 days after descent (T3)...
April 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28242600/the-susceptibility-gene-screening-in-a-chinese-high-altitude-pulmonary-edema-family-by-whole-exome-sequencing
#15
Yang Yingzhong, Wang Yaping, Xu Jin, Ge Rili
High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is one of idiopathic mountain sicknesses that occur in healthy lowlanders when they quickly ascend to altitudes exceeding 2500 m above sea levels within 1-7 days. Growing evidence suggests that genetics plays an important role in the risk of HAPE. In this study, we recruited a Chinese HAPE family and screened genetic variations in the 7 family members (including 6 family members with a medical history of HAPE and the propositus's mother) by whole-exome sequencing. The results showed 18 genetic variations (9 SNVs and 9 Indels) were related to HAPE...
February 20, 2017: Yi Chuan, Hereditas
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28240265/a-longitudinal-study-of-cerebral-blood-flow-under-hypoxia-at-high-altitude-using-3d-pseudo-continuous-arterial-spin-labeling
#16
Wenjia Liu, Jie Liu, Xin Lou, Dandan Zheng, Bing Wu, Danny J J Wang, Lin Ma
Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) may occur with acute exposure to high altitude; however, the CBF of the brain parenchyma has not been studied to date. In this study, identical magnetic resonance scans using arterial spin labeling (ASL) were performed to study the haemodynamic changes at both sea level and high altitude. We found that with acute exposure to high altitude, the CBF in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subjects was higher (P < 0.05), while the CBF of non-AMS subjects was lower (P > 0...
February 27, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28168119/demographic-ecological-and-physiological-responses-of-ringed-seals-to-an-abrupt-decline-in-sea-ice-availability
#17
Steven H Ferguson, Brent G Young, David J Yurkowski, Randi Anderson, Cornelia Willing, Ole Nielsen
To assess whether demographic declines of Arctic species at the southern limit of their range will be gradual or punctuated, we compared large-scale environmental patterns including sea ice dynamics to ringed seal (Pusa hispida) reproduction, body condition, recruitment, and stress in Hudson Bay from 2003 to 2013. Aerial surveys suggested a gradual decline in seal density from 1995 to 2013, with the lowest density occurring in 2013. Body condition decreased and stress (cortisol) increased over time in relation to longer open water periods...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27986366/end-tidal-co2-relates-to-seasickness-susceptibility-a-study-in-antarctic-voyages
#18
Tatsuhisa Hasegawa, Hirofumi Oe, Masakatsu Taki, Hirofumi Sakaguchi, Shigeru Hirano, Yoshiro Wada
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) and seasickness (motion sickness at sea) during an Antarctic voyage. METHODS: In this study, we measured EtCO2 and severity of seasickness using the subjective symptoms of motion sickness (SSMS). We sampled EtCO2 and SSMS every 3-4h for 3 days from the date of sail in 16 healthy subjects. This experiment was performed on an icebreaker (standard displacement: 12,650t). RESULTS: Since 2 subjects dropped out because of severe motion sickness, available data were collected from 14 subjects...
December 13, 2016: Auris, Nasus, Larynx
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27821551/senp1-drives-hypoxia-induced-polycythemia-via-gata1-and-bcl-xl-in-subjects-with-monge-s-disease
#19
Priti Azad, Huiwen W Zhao, Pedro J Cabrales, Roy Ronen, Dan Zhou, Orit Poulsen, Otto Appenzeller, Yu Hsin Hsiao, Vineet Bafna, Gabriel G Haddad
In this study, because excessive polycythemia is a predominant trait in some high-altitude dwellers (chronic mountain sickness [CMS] or Monge's disease) but not others living at the same altitude in the Andes, we took advantage of this human experiment of nature and used a combination of induced pluripotent stem cell technology, genomics, and molecular biology in this unique population to understand the molecular basis for hypoxia-induced excessive polycythemia. As compared with sea-level controls and non-CMS subjects who responded to hypoxia by increasing their RBCs modestly or not at all, respectively, CMS cells increased theirs remarkably (up to 60-fold)...
November 14, 2016: Journal of Experimental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27727851/clinical-profile-of-decompression-sickness-in-deep-sea-divers
#20
Ajinkya Borhade, S Arulrhaj, B Kannan, Rakesh Sonavane
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
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