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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28439981/evolution-of-the-plasma-proteome-of-divers-before-and-after-a-single-scuba-dive
#1
Jacky Lautridou, Vianney Pichereau, Sébastien Artigaud, Benoit Bernay, Otto Barak, Ryan Hoiland, Andrew T Lovering, Ingrid Eftedal, Zeljko Dujic, François Guerrero
PURPOSE: Decompression sickness (DCS) is a poorly understood and complex systemic disease caused by inadequate desaturation following a reduction of ambient pressure. A previous proteomic study of ours showed that DCS occurrence but not diving was associated with changes in the plasma proteome in rats, including a dramatic decrease of abundance of the tetrameric form of Transthyretin (TTR). The present study aims to assess the impact on the human blood proteome of a dive inducing significant decompression stress but without inducing DCS symptoms...
April 25, 2017: Proteomics. Clinical Applications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421029/a-historical-view-of-motion-sickness-a-plague-at-sea-and-on-land-also-with-military-impact
#2
Doreen Huppert, Judy Benson, Thomas Brandt
Seasickness and its triggers, symptoms, and preventive measures were well known in antiquity. This chapter is based on an analysis of descriptions of motion sickness, in particular seasickness, in ancient Greek, Roman, and Chinese literature. A systematic search was made from the Greek period beginning with Homer in 800 BC to the late Roman period and ending with Aetios Amidenos in 600 AD, as well as in the Chinese medical classics dating from around 300 AD. Major aspects are the following: body movements caused by waves were identified in all cultures as the critical stimuli...
2017: Frontiers in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28394182/medex2015-greater-sea-level-fitness-is-associated-with-lower-sense-of-effort-during-himalayan-trekking-without-worse-acute-mountain-sickness
#3
Gabriella M K Rossetti, Jamie H Macdonald, Matthew Smith, Anna R Jackson, Nigel Callender, Hannah K Newcombe, Heather M Storey, Sebastian Willis, Jojanneke van den Beukel, Jonathan Woodward, James Pollard, Benjamin Wood, Victoria Newton, Jana Virian, Owen Haswell, Samuel J Oliver
Rossetti, Gabriella M.K., Jamie H. Macdonald, Matthew Smith, Anna R. Jackson, Nigel Callender, Hannah K. Newcombe, Heather M. Storey, Sebastian Willis, Jojanneke van den Beukel, Jonathan Woodward, James Pollard, Benjamin Wood, Victoria Newton, Jana Virian, Owen Haswell, and Samuel J. Oliver. MEDEX2015: Greater sea-level fitness is associated with lower sense of effort during Himalayan trekking without worse acute mountain sickness. High Alt Med Biol 00:000-000, 2017.-This study examined the complex relationships of fitness and hypoxic sensitivity with submaximal exercise responses and acute mountain sickness (AMS) at altitude...
April 10, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28357819/a-comparative-evaluation-of-two-decompression-procedures-for-technical-diving-using-inflammatory-responses-compartmental-versus-ratio-deco
#4
Enzo Spisni, Claudio Marabotti, Luigia De Fazio, Maria Chiara Valerii, Elena Cavazza, Stefano Brambilla, Klarida Hoxha, Antonio L'Abbate, Pasquale Longobardi
INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to compare two decompression procedures commonly adopted by technical divers: the ZH-L16 algorithm modified by 30/85 gradient factors (compartmental decompression model, CDM) versus the 'ratio decompression strategy' (RDS). The comparison was based on an analysis of changes in diver circulating inflammatory profiles caused by decompression from a single dive. METHODS: Fifty-one technical divers performed a single trimix dive to 50 metres' sea water (msw) for 25 minutes followed by enriched air (EAN50) and oxygen decompression...
March 2017: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28329216/heart-mechanics-at-high-altitude-6%C3%A2-days-on-the-top-of-europe
#5
Claire Maufrais, Thomas Rupp, Pierre Bouzat, Gregory Doucende, Samuel Verges, Stéphane Nottin, Guillaume Walther
Aims: The aim of this study was to analyse the underlying mechanisms of left and right ventricular (LV and RV) functional alterations during several days in high-altitude hypoxia. Methods and results: Resting evaluations of LV and RV function and mechanics were assessed by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography on 11 subjects at sea level (SLPRE), 3 ± 2 h after helicopter transport to high altitude (D0), at day 2 (D2), day 4 (D4) and day 6 (D6) at 4350 m and 5 ± 2 h after return to sea level (SLPOST)...
December 22, 2016: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323589/preventing-high-altitude-cerebral-edema-in-rats-with-repurposed-anti-angiogenesis-pharmacotherapy
#6
Samantha Tarshis, Joanne Maltzahn, Zoe Loomis, David C Irwin
BACKGROUND: High altitude cerebral edema (HACE) is a fulminant, deadly, and yet still unpredictable brain disease. A new prophylactic treatment for HACE and its predecessor, acute mountain sickness (AMS), needs to be developed without the contraindications or adverse effect profiles of acetazolamide and dexamethasone. Since neovascularization signals are likely key contributors to HACE/AMS, our approach was to examine already existing anti-angiogenic drugs to inhibit potential initiating HACE pathway(s)...
December 1, 2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251400/effects-of-rapid-ascent-on-the-heart-rate-variability-of-individuals-with-and-without-acute-mountain-sickness
#7
Ming Ling Yih, Fang-Chi Lin, Heng-Sheng Chao, Han-Chen Tsai, Shi-Chuan Chang
PURPOSE: Through time- and frequency-domain analysis, we compared the effects of acute hypobaric hypoxia on the changes in heart rate variability (HRV) following night sleeping and morning awakening in individuals with and without acute mountain sickness (AMS). METHOD: Thirty-nine nonacclimatised healthy individuals were transported by bus from sea level to 3150 m within 3 h. Short-term HRV was measured two times a day-before sleeping (BS) and after awakening (AA)- at 3 days before ascent (T0), two consecutive nights at 3150 m (T1 and T2), and 2 days after descent (T3)...
March 1, 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28242600/the-susceptibility-gene-screening-in-a-chinese-high-altitude-pulmonary-edema-family-by-whole-exome-sequencing
#8
Yang Yingzhong, Wang Yaping, Xu Jin, Ge Rili
High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is one of idiopathic mountain sicknesses that occur in healthy lowlanders when they quickly ascend to altitudes exceeding 2500 m above sea levels within 1-7 days. Growing evidence suggests that genetics plays an important role in the risk of HAPE. In this study, we recruited a Chinese HAPE family and screened genetic variations in the 7 family members (including 6 family members with a medical history of HAPE and the propositus's mother) by whole-exome sequencing. The results showed 18 genetic variations (9 SNVs and 9 Indels) were related to HAPE...
February 20, 2017: Yi Chuan, Hereditas
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28240265/a-longitudinal-study-of-cerebral-blood-flow-under-hypoxia-at-high-altitude-using-3d-pseudo-continuous-arterial-spin-labeling
#9
Wenjia Liu, Jie Liu, Xin Lou, Dandan Zheng, Bing Wu, Danny J J Wang, Lin Ma
Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) may occur with acute exposure to high altitude; however, the CBF of the brain parenchyma has not been studied to date. In this study, identical magnetic resonance scans using arterial spin labeling (ASL) were performed to study the haemodynamic changes at both sea level and high altitude. We found that with acute exposure to high altitude, the CBF in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subjects was higher (P < 0.05), while the CBF of non-AMS subjects was lower (P > 0...
February 27, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28168119/demographic-ecological-and-physiological-responses-of-ringed-seals-to-an-abrupt-decline-in-sea-ice-availability
#10
Steven H Ferguson, Brent G Young, David J Yurkowski, Randi Anderson, Cornelia Willing, Ole Nielsen
To assess whether demographic declines of Arctic species at the southern limit of their range will be gradual or punctuated, we compared large-scale environmental patterns including sea ice dynamics to ringed seal (Pusa hispida) reproduction, body condition, recruitment, and stress in Hudson Bay from 2003 to 2013. Aerial surveys suggested a gradual decline in seal density from 1995 to 2013, with the lowest density occurring in 2013. Body condition decreased and stress (cortisol) increased over time in relation to longer open water periods...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27986366/end-tidal-co2-relates-to-seasickness-susceptibility-a-study-in-antarctic-voyages
#11
Tatsuhisa Hasegawa, Hirofumi Oe, Masakatsu Taki, Hirofumi Sakaguchi, Shigeru Hirano, Yoshiro Wada
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) and seasickness (motion sickness at sea) during an Antarctic voyage. METHODS: In this study, we measured EtCO2 and severity of seasickness using the subjective symptoms of motion sickness (SSMS). We sampled EtCO2 and SSMS every 3-4h for 3 days from the date of sail in 16 healthy subjects. This experiment was performed on an icebreaker (standard displacement: 12,650t). RESULTS: Since 2 subjects dropped out because of severe motion sickness, available data were collected from 14 subjects...
December 13, 2016: Auris, Nasus, Larynx
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27821551/senp1-drives-hypoxia-induced-polycythemia-via-gata1-and-bcl-xl-in-subjects-with-monge-s-disease
#12
Priti Azad, Huiwen W Zhao, Pedro J Cabrales, Roy Ronen, Dan Zhou, Orit Poulsen, Otto Appenzeller, Yu Hsin Hsiao, Vineet Bafna, Gabriel G Haddad
In this study, because excessive polycythemia is a predominant trait in some high-altitude dwellers (chronic mountain sickness [CMS] or Monge's disease) but not others living at the same altitude in the Andes, we took advantage of this human experiment of nature and used a combination of induced pluripotent stem cell technology, genomics, and molecular biology in this unique population to understand the molecular basis for hypoxia-induced excessive polycythemia. As compared with sea-level controls and non-CMS subjects who responded to hypoxia by increasing their RBCs modestly or not at all, respectively, CMS cells increased theirs remarkably (up to 60-fold)...
November 14, 2016: Journal of Experimental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27727851/clinical-profile-of-decompression-sickness-in-deep-sea-divers
#13
Ajinkya Borhade, S Arulrhaj, B Kannan, Rakesh Sonavane
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27722064/subjective-assessment-of-acute-mountain-sickness-investigating-the-relationship-between-the-lake-louise-self-report-a-visual-analogue-scale-and-psychological-well-being-scales
#14
Anika Frühauf, Martin Burtscher, Elena Pocecco, Martin Faulhaber, Martin Kopp
PURPOSE: There is an ongoing discussion how to assess acute mountain sickness (AMS) in real life conditions. Next to more-item scales with a cut off like the Lake Louise Self-Report (LLS), some authors suggested to use visual analog scales (VAS) to assess AMS. This study tried to contribute to this question using VAS items used for the Subjective Ratings of Drug Effects, including an additional single item for AMS. Furthermore, we investigated if instruments developed to assess psychological well-being might predict AMS assessed via LLS or VAS...
2016: SpringerPlus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27640135/a-higher-baseline-somatization-score-at-sea-level-as-an-independent-predictor-of-acute-mountain-sickness
#15
Shi-Zhu Bian, Jun Jin, Jun-Qing Dong, Qian-Ning Li, Jie Yu, Cai-Fa Tang, Shi-Yong Yu, Xiao-Hui Zhao, Jun Qin, Lan Huang
OBJECTIVE: The current study aimed to identify the predictive values of psychological factors that are evaluated by the Symptoms Checklist-90 (SCL-90) for acute mountain sickness (AMS). METHODS: The subjects (n=285, non-acclimatized young Chinese men), who were recruited in July 2013, completed a case report questionnaire. In addition, their vital signs (heart rate [HR], blood pressure and pulse oxygen saturation) were measured, and their psychological factors were examined using the SCL-90 at sea level...
December 1, 2016: Physiology & Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27638086/mal-de-d%C3%A3-barquement-syndrome
#16
REVIEW
T C Hain, M Cherchi
Mal de débarquement syndrome (MdDS) is typified by a prolonged rocking sensation - for a month or longer - that begins immediately following a lengthy exposure to motion. The provoking motion is usually a sea voyage. About 80% of MdDS sufferers are women, and most of them are middle-aged. MdDS patients are troubled by more migraine headaches than controls. Unlike dizziness caused by vestibular disorders or motion sickness, the symptoms of MdDS usually improve with re-exposure to motion. The long duration of symptoms - a month or more - distinguishes MdDS from land-sickness...
2016: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27638085/motion-sickness
#17
REVIEW
J F Golding
Over 2000 years ago the Greek physician Hippocrates wrote, "sailing on the sea proves that motion disorders the body." Indeed, the word "nausea" derives from the Greek root word naus, hence "nautical," meaning a ship. The primary signs and symptoms of motion sickness are nausea and vomiting. Motion sickness can be provoked by a wide variety of transport environments, including land, sea, air, and space. The recent introduction of new visual technologies may expose more of the population to visually induced motion sickness...
2016: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27633944/reversible-brain-abnormalities-in-people-without-signs-of-mountain-sickness-during-high-altitude-exposure
#18
Cunxiu Fan, Yuhua Zhao, Qian Yu, Wu Yin, Haipeng Liu, Jianzhong Lin, Tianhe Yang, Ming Fan, Luobu Gesang, Jiaxing Zhang
A large proportion of lowlanders ascending to high-altitude (HA) show no signs of mountain sickness. Whether their brains have indeed suffered from HA environment and the persistent sequelae after return to lowland remain unknown. Thirty-one sea-level college students, who had a 30-day teaching on Qinghai-Tibet plateau underwent MRI scans before, during, and two months after HA exposure. Brain volume, cortical structures, and white matter microstructure were measured. Besides, serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE), C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6 and neuropsychiatric behaviors were tested...
2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27562522/updating-a-gas-dynamics-model-using-estimates-for-california-sea-lions-zalophus-californianus
#19
Matthew R Hodanbosi, Blair Sterba-Boatwright, Andreas Fahlman
Theoretical models are used to predict how breath-hold diving vertebrates manage O2, CO2, and N2 while underwater. One recent gas dynamics model used available lung and tracheal compliance data from various species. As variation in respiratory compliance significantly affects alveolar compression and pulmonary shunt, the current study objective was to evaluate changes in model output when using species-specific parameters from California sea lions (Zalophus californianus). We explored the effects of lung and dead space compliance on the uptake of N2, O2, and CO2 in various tissues during a series of hypothetical dives...
August 22, 2016: Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27454014/dark-adaptation-at-high-altitude-an-unexpected-pupillary-response-to-chronic-hypoxia-in-andean-highlanders
#20
Katherine Healy, Alain B Labrique, J Jaime Miranda, Robert H Gilman, David Danz, Victor G Davila-Roman, Luis Huicho, Fabiola León-Velarde, William Checkley
Healy, Katherine, Alain B. Labrique, J. Jaime Miranda, Robert H. Gilman, David Danz, Victor G. Davila-Roman, Luis Huicho, Fabiola León-Velarde, and William Checkley. Dark adaptation at high altitude: an unexpected pupillary response to chronic hypoxia in Andean highlanders. High Alt Med Biol. 16:000-000, 2016.-Chronic mountain sickness is a maladaptive response to high altitude (>2500 m above sea level) and is characterized by excessive erythrocytosis and hypoxemia resulting from long-term hypobaric hypoxia...
July 25, 2016: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
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