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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29051628/deadly-acute-decompression-sickness-in-risso-s-dolphins
#1
A Fernández, E Sierra, J Díaz-Delgado, S Sacchini, Y Sánchez-Paz, C Suárez-Santana, M Arregui, M Arbelo, Y Bernaldo de Quirós
Diving air-breathing vertebrates have long been considered protected against decompression sickness (DCS) through anatomical, physiological, and behavioural adaptations. However, an acute systemic gas and fat embolic syndrome similar to DCS in human divers was described in beaked whales that stranded in temporal and spatial association with military exercises involving high-powered sonar. More recently, DCS has been diagnosed in bycaught sea turtles. Both cases were linked to human activities. Two Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) out of 493 necropsied cetaceans stranded in the Canary Islands in a 16-year period (2000-2015), had a severe acute decompression sickness supported by pathological findings and gas analysis...
October 19, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29042272/effect-of-dietary-nitrate-on-respiratory-physiology-at-high-altitude-results-from-the-xtreme-alps-study
#2
Andrew Cumpstey, Philip J Hennis, Edward T Gilbert-Kawai, Bernadette O Fernandez, Matthieu Poudevigne, Alexandra Cobb, Paula Meale, Kay Mitchell, Helen Moyses, Helmut Pöhnl, Monty G Mythen, Michael P W Grocott, Martin Feelisch, Daniel S Martin
Nitric oxide (NO) production plays a central role in conferring tolerance to hypoxia. Tibetan highlanders, successful high-altitude dwellers for millennia, have higher circulating nitrate and exhaled NO (ENO) levels than native lowlanders. Since nitrate itself can reduce the oxygen cost of exercise in normoxia it may confer additional benefits at high altitude. Xtreme Alps was a double-blinded randomised placebo-controlled trial to investigate how dietary nitrate supplementation affects physiological responses to hypoxia in 28 healthy adult volunteers resident at 4559 m for 1 week; 14 receiving a beetroot-based high-nitrate supplement and 14 receiving a low-nitrate 'placebo' of matching appearance/taste...
October 14, 2017: Nitric Oxide: Biology and Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28974936/dive-risk-factors-gas-bubble-formation-and-decompression-illness-in-recreational-scuba-diving-analysis-of-dan-europe-dsl-data-base
#3
Danilo Cialoni, Massimo Pieri, Costantino Balestra, Alessandro Marroni
Introduction: The popularity of SCUBA diving is steadily increasing together with the number of dives and correlated diseases per year. The rules that govern correct decompression procedures are considered well known even if the majority of Decompression Sickness (DCS) cases are considered unexpected confirming a bias in the "mathematical ability" to predict DCS by the current algorithms. Furthermore, little is still known about diving risk factors and any individual predisposition to DCS. This study provides an in-depth epidemiological analysis of the diving community, to include additional risk factors correlated with the development of circulating bubbles and DCS...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28951950/high-altitude-adaptation-in-humans-from-genomics-to-integrative-physiology
#4
REVIEW
Priti Azad, Tsering Stobdan, Dan Zhou, Iain Hartley, Ali Akbari, Vineet Bafna, Gabriel G Haddad
About 1.2 to 33% of high-altitude populations suffer from Monge's disease or chronic mountain sickness (CMS). Number of factors such as age, sex, and population of origin (older, male, Andean) contribute to the percentage reported from a variety of samples. It is estimated that there are around 83 million people who live at altitudes > 2500 m worldwide and are at risk for CMS. In this review, we focus on a human "experiment in nature" in various high-altitude locations in the world-namely, Andean, Tibetan, and Ethiopian populations that have lived under chronic hypoxia conditions for thousands of years...
September 26, 2017: Journal of Molecular Medicine: Official Organ of the "Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Ärzte"
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28947454/relationship-of-altitude-mountain-sickness-and-smoking-a-catalan-traveller-s-cohort-study
#5
Alba Sánchez-Mascuñano, Cristina Masuet-Aumatell, Sergio Morchón-Ramos, Josep M Ramon
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between smoking and altitude mountain sickness in a cohort of travellers to 2500 metres above sea level (masl) or higher. SETTING: Travel Health Clinic at the Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, in Barcelona, Spain. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 302 adults seeking medical advice at the travel clinic, between July 2012 and August 2014, before travelling to 2500 masl or above, who agreed to participate in the study and to be contacted after the trip were included...
September 24, 2017: BMJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28777905/decompression-sickness-among-diving-fishermen-in-mexico-observational-retrospective-analysis-of-dcs-in-three-sea-cucumber-fishing-seasons
#6
Oswaldo Huchim-Lara, Walter Chin, Silvia Salas, Normando Rivera-Canul, Salvador Cordero-Romero, Juan Tec, Ellie Joo, Nina Mendez-Dominguez
The probabilities of decompression sickness (DCS) among diving fishermen are higher than in any other group of divers. Diving behavior of artisanal fishermen has been directed mainly to target high-value species. The aim of this study was to learn about the occurrence of DCS derived from sea cucumber harvesting in the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico. We conducted a retrospective chart review of diving fishermen treated at a multiplace hyperbaric chamber in Tizimín, Mexico. In total, 233 recompression therapies were rendered to 166 diving fishermen from 2014 to 2016...
March 2017: Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine: Journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731986/the-effect-of-sex-on-heart-rate-variability-at-high-altitude
#7
Christopher John Boos, Emma Vincent, Adrian Mellor, John O'Hara, Caroline Newman, Richard Cruttenden, Phylip Scott, Mark Cooke, Jamie Matu, David Richard Woods
There is evidence to suggest that high altitude (HA) exposure leads to a fall in heart rate variability (HRV) that is linked to the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). The effects of sex on changes in HRV at HA and its relationship to AMS are unknown. METHODS: HRV (5-minute single lead ECG) was measured in 63 healthy adults (41 men and 22 women) aged 18-56 years at sea level (SL) and during a HA trek at 3619m, 4600m and 5140m respectively. The main effects of altitude (SL, 3619, 4600 and 5140m) and sex (men vs women) and their potential interaction were assessed using a Factorial Repeated Measures ANOVA...
July 20, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28705998/is-normobaric-hypoxia-an-effective-treatment-for-sustaining-previously-acquired-altitude-acclimatization
#8
Beth A Beidleman, Charles S Fulco, Bruce S Cadarette, Allen Cymerman, Mark J Buller, Roy M Salgado, Alexander M Posch, Janet E Staab, Ingrid V Sils, Beau R Yurkevicius, Adam J Luippold, Alexander P Welles, Stephen R Muza
This study examined whether normobaric hypoxia (NH) treatment is more efficacious for sustaining high altitude (HA) acclimatization during re-introduction to altitude (RA) than no treatment at all. Seventeen sea level (SL) residents (age=23±6yrs; mean±SE) completed in the following order: 1)4d of SL testing, 2)12d of high altitude (HA) acclimatization at 4300m, 3)12d at SL post HA acclimatization (Post) where each received either NH (n=9;FiO2=0.122) or Sham (n=8;FiO2=0.207) treatment, and 4)24-h re-introduction to 4300m altitude (RA) in a hypobaric chamber...
July 13, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28684588/dietary-nitrate-supplementation-increases-acute-mountain-sickness-severity-and-sense-of-effort-during-hypoxic-exercise
#9
Gabriella M K Rossetti, Jamie Hugo Macdonald, Lee J Wylie, Samuel J Little, Victoria Newton, Benjamin Wood, Kieran A Hawkins, Rhys Beddoe, Hannah E Davies, Samuel James Oliver
Dietary nitrate supplementation enhances sea level performance and may ameliorate hypoxemia at high altitude. However, nitrate may exacerbate acute mountain sickness (AMS), specifically headache. This study investigated the effect of nitrate supplementation on AMS symptoms and exercise responses with 6h hypoxia. Twenty recreationally-active men (mean(SD): age 22(4) years, V̇O2max 51(6) mL·min-1·kg-1) completed this randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled crossover study. Twelve participants were classified as AMS- based on Environmental Symptom Questionnaire (AMS-C) score <0...
July 6, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28665150/association-between-plasma-n-acylethanolamides-and-high-hemoglobin-concentration-in-southern-peruvian-highlanders
#10
Dulce E Alarcón-Yaquetto, Lidia Caballero, Gustavo F Gonzales
Alarcón-Yaquetto, Dulce E., Lidia Caballero, and Gustavo F. Gonzales. Association between plasma N-acylethanolamides and high hemoglobin concentration in Southern Peruvian highlanders. High Alt Med Biol 00:000-000, 2017.-High-altitude (HA) hypoxia is a stressful condition endured by organisms through different mechanisms. Failing to adapt to chronic HA exposure leads to a disease called chronic mountain sickness (CMS) characterized by excessive erythrocytosis (hemoglobin [Hb] ≥19 g/dL for women and ≥21 g/dL for men)...
June 30, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28661230/circle-co2-reabsorbing-breathing-systems-human-applications
#11
Patrick Magee
Artificial breathing systems to help humans survive extreme environments are used over a range of ambient pressures, using various gases of different volumetric concentrations. These activities include anaesthesia and intensive care activity, high-altitude mountaineering, firefighting, aerospace extravehicular space activity and underwater diving operations. A circle breathing system is one in which the exhaled carbon dioxide is absorbed by an alkali substance and the remaining unused gases are recirculated, usually for the sake of economy and environment...
July 2017: Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Part H, Journal of Engineering in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28653390/interventions-for-preventing-high-altitude-illness-part-1-commonly-used-classes-of-drugs
#12
REVIEW
Víctor H Nieto Estrada, Daniel Molano Franco, Roger David Medina, Alejandro G Gonzalez Garay, Arturo J Martí-Carvajal, Ingrid Arevalo-Rodriguez
BACKGROUND: High altitude illness (HAI) is a term used to describe a group of cerebral and pulmonary syndromes that can occur during travel to elevations above 2500 metres (8202 feet). Acute hypoxia, acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE) and high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) are reported as potential medical problems associated with high altitude. In this review, the first in a series of three about preventive strategies for HAI, we assess the effectiveness of six of the most recommended classes of pharmacological interventions...
June 27, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28641322/scuba-diving-and-otology-a-systematic-review-with-recommendations-on-diagnosis-treatment-and-post-operative-care
#13
REVIEW
Devon M Livingstone, Kristine A Smith, Beth Lange
Scuba diving is a popular recreational and professional activity with inherent risks. Complications related to barotrauma and decompression illness can pose significant morbidity to a diver's hearing and balance systems. The majority of dive-related injuries affect the head and neck, particularly the outer, middle and inner ear. Given the high incidence of otologic complications from diving, an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of otic pathology is a necessity. We performed a systematic and comprehensive literature review including the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of otologic pathology related to diving...
June 2017: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28635658/asperentin-b-a-new-inhibitor-of-the-protein-tyrosine-phosphatase-1b
#14
Jutta Wiese, Hülya Aldemir, Rolf Schmaljohann, Tobias A M Gulder, Johannes F Imhoff
In the frame of studies on secondary metabolites produced by fungi from deep-sea environments we have investigated inhibitors of enzymes playing key roles in signaling cascades of biochemical pathways relevant for the treatment of diseases. Here we report on a new inhibitor of the human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a target in the signaling pathway of insulin. A new asperentin analog is produced by an Aspergillussydowii strain isolated from the sediment of the deep Mediterranean Sea. Asperentin B (1) contains an additional phenolic hydroxy function at C-6 and exhibits an IC50 value against PTP1B of 2 μM in vitro, which is six times stronger than the positive control, suramin...
June 21, 2017: Marine Drugs
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28590162/exercise-testing-supplemental-oxygen-and-hypoxia
#15
Susan A Ward, Michael P W Grocott, Denny Z H Levett
Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in hyperoxia and hypoxia has several applications, stemming from characterization of abnormal physiological response profiles associated with exercise intolerance. As altered oxygenation can impact the performance of gas-concentration and flow sensors and pulmonary gas exchange algorithms, integrated CPET system function requires validation under these conditions. Also, as oxygenation status can influence peak [Formula: see text]o2, care should be taken in the selection of work-rate incrementation rates when CPET performance is to be compared with normobaria at sea level...
July 2017: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545324/postmortem-examination-of-australian-sea-snakes-hydrophiinae-anatomy-and-common-pathologic-conditions
#16
Amber K Gillett, Richard Ploeg, Mark Flint, Paul C Mills
There is limited published information about disease in wild sea snakes and no standardized guideline for postmortem examination of sea snakes. Identifying causes of morbidity and mortality of marine vertebrate species has been pivotal to understanding disease factors implicated in stranding events and assisting with the formulation of conservation plans. Additionally, postmortem findings can provide valuable information on life history traits and the ecology of these reclusive species. Sick, moribund, or dead sea snakes are intermittently washed ashore along Australian and international beaches and provide an opportunity to examine a subset of the population and identify causes of population decline...
May 1, 2017: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28531363/beneficial-effect-of-enriched-air-nitrox-on-bubble-formation-during-scuba-diving-an-open-water-study
#17
Anne-Kathrin Brebeck, Andreas Deussen, Ursula Range, Costantino Balestra, Sinclair Cleveland, Jochen D Schipke
Bubble formation during scuba diving might induce decompression sickness. This prospective randomised and double-blind study included 108 advanced recreational divers (38 females). Fifty-four pairs of divers, 1 breathing air and the other breathing nitrox28 undertook a standardised dive (24 ± 1 msw; 62 ± 5min) in the Red Sea. Venous gas bubbles were counted (Doppler) 30-<45 min (early) and 45-60 min (late) post-dive at jugular, subclavian and femoral sites. Only 7% (air) vs. 11% (air28®) (n.s.) were bubble-free after a dive...
May 21, 2017: Journal of Sports Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28474702/-hemoglobin-changes-hb-in-miners-exposed-to-high-altitude-and-associated-factors
#18
Christian R Mejia, Dante M Quiñones-Laveriano, Raúl Gomero, Luis Pérez-Pérez
AIM: To determine the variation of hemoglobin (Hb) in two groups of miners working at different altitudes. METHODOLOGY: A longitudinal study conducted in a private company. Hb was obtained from entrance exams and annual checks of workers at two locations: at sea level and at Peruvian highlands (4,100 m), taken by trained staff and equipment calibrated to environmental conditions. We analyzed variations in the course of the years with the PA-GEE statistical test; p values were obtained...
March 2017: Gaceta Médica de México
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28469847/response-to-letter-to-the-editor-regarding-acute-mountain-sickness-among-tourists-visiting-the-high-altitude-city-of-lhasa-tibet-china-at-3658%C3%A2-m-above-sea-level-a-cross-sectional-study
#19
Gonggalanzi, Per Nafstad
We kindly thank the journal for the opportunity to respond to the recent comments made regarding our manuscript entitled "Acute mountain sickness among tourists visiting the high-altitude city of Lhasa, Tibet, China at 3658 m above sea level: A cross-sectional study".
2017: Archives of Public Health, Archives Belges de Santé Publique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28439981/evolution-of-the-plasma-proteome-of-divers-before-and-after-a-single-scuba-dive
#20
Jacky Lautridou, Vianney Pichereau, Sébastien Artigaud, Benoit Bernay, Otto Barak, Ryan Hoiland, Andrew T Lovering, Ingrid Eftedal, Zeljko Dujic, François Guerrero
PURPOSE: Decompression sickness (DCS) is a poorly understood and complex systemic disease caused by inadequate desaturation following a reduction of ambient pressure. A previous proteomic study of ours showed that DCS occurrence but not diving was associated with changes in the plasma proteome in rats, including a dramatic decrease of abundance of the tetrameric form of Transthyretin (TTR). The present study aims to assess the impact on the human blood proteome of a dive inducing significant decompression stress but without inducing DCS symptoms...
September 2017: Proteomics. Clinical Applications
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