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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673435/decompression-sickness-in-the-f-a-18c-after-atypical-cabin-pressure-fluctuations
#1
Katherine J Lee, Aliye Z Sanou
BACKGROUND: The spectrum of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) is evolving as more cases of atypical pressure fluctuations occur. This ongoing change makes it a difficult condition to diagnose and even more difficult to identify. Both Flight Surgeons and Undersea Medical Officers (UMOs) must keep DCS on the differential. These two cases describe altitude DCS after unique pressure patterns, with one at a markedly lower than expected altitude for DCS. CASE REPORT: Both cases occurred in the F/A-18C and resulted in DCS requiring hyperbaric chamber treatment...
May 1, 2018: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29670534/divergent-mitochondrial-antioxidant-activities-and-lung-alveolar-architecture-in-the-lungs-of-rats-and-mice-at-high-altitude
#2
Alexandra Jochmans-Lemoine, Susana Revollo, Gabriella Villalpando, Ibana Valverde, Marcelino Gonzales, Sofien Laouafa, Jorge Soliz, Vincent Joseph
Compared with mice, adult rats living at 3,600 m above sea level (SL-La Paz, Bolivia) have high hematocrit, signs of pulmonary hypertension, and low lung volume with reduced alveolar surface area. This phenotype is associated with chronic mountain sickness in humans living at high altitude (HA). We tested the hypothesis that this phenotype is associated with impaired gas exchange and oxidative stress in the lungs. We used rats and mice (3 months old) living at HA (La Paz) and SL (Quebec City, Canada) to measure arterial oxygen saturation under graded levels of hypoxia (by pulse oximetry), the alveolar surface area in lung slices and the activity of pro- (NADPH and xanthine oxidases-NOX and XO) and anti- (superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase-SOD and GPx) oxidant enzymes in cytosolic and mitochondrial lung protein extracts...
2018: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29625625/association-of-egln1-genetic-polymorphisms-with-spo-2-responses-to-acute-hypobaric-hypoxia-in-a-japanese-cohort
#3
Yoshiki Yasukochi, Takayuki Nishimura, Midori Motoi, Shigeki Watanuki
BACKGROUND: Recent studies have explored various genetic and physiological factors related to high-altitude adaptation in highlander populations. However, the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), influencing such adaptation, on physiological responses to hypobaric hypoxia have not been examined in lowlanders with lowlander ancestry. Thus, we aimed to investigate the association between SNPs around the EGLN1 genomic region, possibly involved in high-altitude adaptation, and physiological changes to hypobaric hypoxia exposure in a cohort of Japanese lowlanders...
April 6, 2018: Journal of Physiological Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29623044/long-term-intermittent-work-at-high-altitude-right-heart-functional-and-morphological-status-and-associated-cardiometabolic-factors
#4
Julio Brito, Patricia Siques, Rosario López, Raul Romero, Fabiola León-Velarde, Karen Flores, Nicole Lüneburg, Juliane Hannemann, Rainer H Böger
Background: Living at high altitude or with chronic hypoxia implies functional and morphological changes in the right ventricle and pulmonary vasculature with a 10% prevalence of high-altitude pulmonary hypertension (HAPH). The implications of working intermittently (day shifts) at high altitude (hypobaric hypoxia) over the long term are still not well-defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the right cardiac circuit status along with potentially contributory metabolic variables and distinctive responses after long exposure to the latter condition...
2018: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29614518/hypobaric-hypoxia-causes-elevated-thrombin-generation-mediated-by-fviii-that-is-balanced-by-decreased-platelet-activation
#5
Cécile H Kicken, Marisa Ninivaggi, Joke Konings, Martijn Moorlag, Dana Huskens, Jasper A Remijn, Saartje Bloemen, Marcus D Lancé, Bas De Laat
INTRODUCTION:  Epidemiological studies suggest that hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude poses a risk for developing venous thromboembolism. The cause of this observed hypercoagulability remains unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of hypobaric hypoxia at 3,883 m above sea level on thrombin generation and platelet activation. METHODS:  After complying with medical ethical procedures, 18 participants were recruited, of whom 1 had to leave the study prematurely due to mild acute mountain sickness...
April 3, 2018: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29571231/a-case-control-questionnaire-survey-of-decompression-sickness-risk-in-okinawa-divers
#6
Naoko Suzuki, Kazuyoshi Yagishita, Mitsuhiro Enomoto, Yasushi Kojima, Takuya Oyaizu, Masaharu Shibayama, Kazuo Yamamoto
Background: Decompression sickness (DCS) is a rare condition that is often difficult to diagnose in deep-sea divers. Because of this, prevention and early diagnosis are important. In this case-control study, we examined the risk and preventive factors associated with DCS. Methods: Our original questionnaire survey was conducted among 269 recreational divers in Okinawa. Divers who were diagnosed with DCS by a physician (n = 94) were compared with healthy recreational divers (n = 175)...
January 2018: Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine: Journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29553010/-cleanse-or-die-british-naval-hygiene-in-the-age-of-steam-1840-1900
#7
Elise Juzda Smith
This article focuses on the consolidation of naval hygiene practices during the Victorian era, a period of profound medical change that coincided with the fleet's transition from sail to steam. The ironclads of the mid- to late- nineteenth century offered ample opportunities to improve preventive medicine at sea, and surgeons capitalised on new steam technologies to provide cleaner, dryer, and airier surroundings below decks. Such efforts reflected the sanitarian idealism of naval medicine in this period, inherited from the eighteenth-century pioneers of the discipline...
April 2018: Medical History
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29535634/effect-of-shallow-and-deep-scuba-dives-on-heart-rate-variability
#8
Yeonsik Noh, Hugo F Posada-Quintero, Yan Bai, Joseph White, John P Florian, Peter R Brink, Ki H Chon
Prolonged and high pressure diving may lead to various physiological changes including significant alterations of autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity that may be associated with altered physical performance, decompression sickness, or central nervous system oxygen toxicity. Ideally, researchers could elucidate ANS function before, during, and after dives that are most associated with altered function and adverse outcomes. However, we have a limited understanding of the activities of the ANS especially during deeper prolonged SCUBA diving because there has never been a convenient way to collect physiological data during deep dives...
2018: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29387446/acetazolamide-reduces-exercise-capacity-following-a-5-day-ascent-to-4559-m-in-a-randomised-study
#9
Arthur R Bradwell, Kimberley Ashdown, Carla Rue, John Delamere, Owen D Thomas, Samuel J E Lucas, Alex D Wright, Stephen J Harris, Stephen D Myers
Objective: To assess whether acetazolamide (Az), used prophylactically for acute mountain sickness (AMS), alters exercise capacity at high altitude. Methods: Az (500 mg daily) or placebo was administered to 20 healthy adults (aged 36±20 years, range 21-77), who were paired for age, sex, AMS susceptibility and weight, in a double-blind, randomised manner. Participants ascended over 5 days to 4559 m, then exercised to exhaustion on a bicycle ergometer, while recording breath-by-breath gas measurements...
2018: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29355592/down-regulation-of-inwardly-rectifying-k-currents-in-astrocytes-derived-from-patients-with-monge-s-disease
#10
Wei Wu, Hang Yao, Helen W Zhao, Juan Wang, Gabriel G Haddad
Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) or Monge's disease is a disease in highlanders. These patients have a variety of neurologic symptoms such as migraine, mental fatigue, confusion, dizziness, loss of appetite, memory loss and neuronal degeneration. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying CMS neuropathology is not understood. In the previous study, we demonstrated that neurons derived from CMS patients' fibroblasts have a decreased expression and altered gating properties of voltage-gated sodium channel...
March 15, 2018: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29340152/impact-of-gas-emboli-and-hyperbaric-treatment-on-respiratory-function-of-loggerhead-sea-turtles-caretta-caretta
#11
Cyril Portugues, Jose Luis Crespo-Picazo, Daniel García-Párraga, Jordi Altimiras, Teresa Lorenzo, Alicia Borque-Espinosa, Andreas Fahlman
Fisheries interactions are the most serious threats for sea turtle populations. Despite the existence of some rescue centres providing post-traumatic care and rehabilitation, adequate treatment is hampered by the lack of understanding of the problems incurred while turtles remain entrapped in fishing gears. Recently it was shown that bycaught loggerhead sea turtles ( Caretta caretta ) could experience formation of gas emboli (GE) and develop decompression sickness (DCS) after trawl and gillnet interaction. This condition could be reversed by hyperbaric O2 treatment (HBOT)...
2018: Conservation Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29211382/rebel-heart-how-an-elite-team-of-air-force-pararescuemen-saved-a-sick-baby-a-thousand-miles-out-at-sea
#12
Kevin Grange
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: JEMS: a Journal of Emergency Medical Services
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29172727/objective-versus-self-reported-sleep-quality-at-high-altitude
#13
Paul J Anderson, Christina M Wood-Wentz, Kent R Bailey, Bruce D Johnson
Anderson, Paul J., Christina M. Wood-Wentz, Kent R. Bailey, and Bruce D. Johnson. Objective versus self-reported sleep quality at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 16:000-000, 2017. BACKGROUND: Previous studies have found little relationship between polysomnography and a diagnosis of acute mountain sickness (AMS) using the Lake Louise Symptom Questionnaire (LLSQ). The correlation between sleep question responses on the LLSQ and polysomnography results has not been explored. We compared LLSQ sleep responses and polysomnography data from our previous study of workers rapidly transported to the South Pole...
November 27, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29157337/simulated-high-altitude-helium-oxygen-diving
#14
Lu Shi, Yan-Meng Zhang, Katsuura Tetsuo, Zhong-Yuan Shi, Yi-Qun Fang, Petar J Denoble, Yang-Yang Li
BACKGROUND: Experience with commercial heliox diving at high altitude is limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute high-altitude exposure on fitness to dive and the safety of decompression after heliox diving while using U.S. Navy heliox decompression tables with Cross correction. METHOD: Four professional male divers were consecutively decompressed in a hypo- and hyperbaric chamber to altitudes of 3000 m (9842.5 ft), 4000 m (13,123...
December 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29051628/deadly-acute-decompression-sickness-in-risso-s-dolphins
#15
A Fernández, E Sierra, J Díaz-Delgado, S Sacchini, Y Sánchez-Paz, C Suárez-Santana, M Arregui, M Arbelo, Y Bernaldo de Quirós
Diving air-breathing vertebrates have long been considered protected against decompression sickness (DCS) through anatomical, physiological, and behavioural adaptations. However, an acute systemic gas and fat embolic syndrome similar to DCS in human divers was described in beaked whales that stranded in temporal and spatial association with military exercises involving high-powered sonar. More recently, DCS has been diagnosed in bycaught sea turtles. Both cases were linked to human activities. Two Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) out of 493 necropsied cetaceans stranded in the Canary Islands in a 16-year period (2000-2015), had a severe acute decompression sickness supported by pathological findings and gas analysis...
October 19, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29042272/effects-of-dietary-nitrate-on-respiratory-physiology-at-high-altitude-results-from-the-xtreme-alps-study
#16
Andrew F Cumpstey, Philip J Hennis, Edward T Gilbert-Kawai, Bernadette O Fernandez, Matthieu Poudevigne, Alexandra Cobb, Paula Meale, Kay Mitchell, Helen Moyses, Helmut Pöhnl, Monty G Mythen, Michael P W Grocott, Martin Feelisch, Daniel S Martin
Nitric oxide (NO) production plays a central role in conferring tolerance to hypoxia. Tibetan highlanders, successful high-altitude dwellers for millennia, have higher circulating nitrate and exhaled NO (ENO ) levels than native lowlanders. Since nitrate itself can reduce the oxygen cost of exercise in normoxia it may confer additional benefits at high altitude. Xtreme Alps was a double-blinded randomised placebo-controlled trial to investigate how dietary nitrate supplementation affects physiological responses to hypoxia in 28 healthy adult volunteers resident at 4559 m for 1 week; 14 receiving a beetroot-based high-nitrate supplement and 14 receiving a low-nitrate 'placebo' of matching appearance/taste...
December 1, 2017: Nitric Oxide: Biology and Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28974936/dive-risk-factors-gas-bubble-formation-and-decompression-illness-in-recreational-scuba-diving-analysis-of-dan-europe-dsl-data-base
#17
Danilo Cialoni, Massimo Pieri, Costantino Balestra, Alessandro Marroni
Introduction: The popularity of SCUBA diving is steadily increasing together with the number of dives and correlated diseases per year. The rules that govern correct decompression procedures are considered well known even if the majority of Decompression Sickness (DCS) cases are considered unexpected confirming a bias in the "mathematical ability" to predict DCS by the current algorithms. Furthermore, little is still known about diving risk factors and any individual predisposition to DCS. This study provides an in-depth epidemiological analysis of the diving community, to include additional risk factors correlated with the development of circulating bubbles and DCS...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28951950/high-altitude-adaptation-in-humans-from-genomics-to-integrative-physiology
#18
REVIEW
Priti Azad, Tsering Stobdan, Dan Zhou, Iain Hartley, Ali Akbari, Vineet Bafna, Gabriel G Haddad
About 1.2 to 33% of high-altitude populations suffer from Monge's disease or chronic mountain sickness (CMS). Number of factors such as age, sex, and population of origin (older, male, Andean) contribute to the percentage reported from a variety of samples. It is estimated that there are around 83 million people who live at altitudes > 2500 m worldwide and are at risk for CMS. In this review, we focus on a human "experiment in nature" in various high-altitude locations in the world-namely, Andean, Tibetan, and Ethiopian populations that have lived under chronic hypoxia conditions for thousands of years...
December 2017: Journal of Molecular Medicine: Official Organ of the "Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Ärzte"
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28947454/relationship-of-altitude-mountain-sickness-and-smoking-a-catalan-traveller-s-cohort-study
#19
Alba Sánchez-Mascuñano, Cristina Masuet-Aumatell, Sergio Morchón-Ramos, Josep M Ramon
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between smoking and altitude mountain sickness in a cohort of travellers to 2500 metres above sea level (masl) or higher. SETTING: Travel Health Clinic at the Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, in Barcelona, Spain. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 302 adults seeking medical advice at the travel clinic, between July 2012 and August 2014, before travelling to 2500 masl or above, who agreed to participate in the study and to be contacted after the trip were included...
September 24, 2017: BMJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28777905/decompression-sickness-among-diving-fishermen-in-mexico-observational-retrospective-analysis-of-dcs-in-three-sea-cucumber-fishing-seasons
#20
Oswaldo Huchim-Lara, Walter Chin, Silvia Salas, Normando Rivera-Canul, Salvador Cordero-Romero, Juan Tec, Ellie Joo, Nina Mendez-Dominguez
The probabilities of decompression sickness (DCS) among diving fishermen are higher than in any other group of divers. Diving behavior of artisanal fishermen has been directed mainly to target high-value species. The aim of this study was to learn about the occurrence of DCS derived from sea cucumber harvesting in the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico. We conducted a retrospective chart review of diving fishermen treated at a multiplace hyperbaric chamber in Tizimín, Mexico. In total, 233 recompression therapies were rendered to 166 diving fishermen from 2014 to 2016...
March 2017: Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine: Journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc
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