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Empathy pain

Man-Kyu Song, Soo-Hee Choi, Do-Hyeong Lee, Kyung-Jun Lee, Won Joon Lee, Do-Hyung Kang
Objective: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is effective in patients with chronic pain. However, the efficacy of CBT for impaired empathy has not been studied in this population. We investigated the effect of CBT on empathy in patients with chronic pain. Methods: Patients with severe chronic pain were recruited. Empathy was assessed before and after CBT using the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). The patients underwent eight sessions over the course of 1 month conducted...
February 28, 2018: Psychiatry Investigation
Pavel Goldstein, Irit Weissman-Fogel, Guillaume Dumas, Simone G Shamay-Tsoory
The mechanisms underlying analgesia related to social touch are not clear. While recent research highlights the role of the empathy of the observer to pain relief in the target, the contribution of social interaction to analgesia is unknown. The current study examines brain-to-brain coupling during pain with interpersonal touch and tests the involvement of interbrain synchrony in pain alleviation. Romantic partners were assigned the roles of target (pain receiver) and observer (pain observer) under pain-no-pain and touch-no-touch conditions concurrent with EEG recording...
February 26, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Thomas J M Kootstra, Suzanne C Wilkens, Mariano E Menendez, David Ring
BACKGROUND: In prior work we demonstrated that patient-rated physician empathy was the strongest driver of patient satisfaction after a visit to an orthopaedic hand surgeon. Data from the primary care setting suggest a positive association between physician empathy and clinical outcomes, including symptoms of the common cold. It is possible that an empathic encounter could make immediate and measureable changes in a patient's mindset, symptoms, and functional limitations. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Comparing patients who rated their physicians as perfectly empathic with those who did not, is there a difference in pre- to postvisit change in Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Upper Extremity Function scores? (2) Do patients who gave their physicians perfectly empathic ratings have a greater decrease in pre- to postvisit change in Pain Intensity, PROMIS Pain Interference, and PROMIS Depression scores? METHODS: Between September 2015 and February 2016, based on the clinic patient flow, 134 new patients were asked to participate in this study...
February 23, 2018: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
Suzanne C Wilkens, Jonathan Lans, Claudia A Bargon, David Ring, Neal C Chen
BACKGROUND: Prior research documents that greater psychologic distress (anxiety/depression) and less effective coping strategies (catastrophic thinking, kinesophobia) are associated with greater pain intensity and greater limitations. Recognition and acknowledgment of verbal and nonverbal indicators of psychologic factors might raise opportunities for improved psychologic health. There is evidence that specific patient words and phrases indicate greater catastrophic thinking. This study tested proposed nonverbal indicators (such as flexion of the wrist during attempted finger flexion or extension of uninjured fingers as the stiff and painful finger is flexed) for their association with catastrophic thinking...
February 14, 2018: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
Jason A Smith
Contemporary art can be a powerful pedagogical tool in the health humanities. Students in an undergraduate course in the health humanities explore the subjective experience of illness and develop their empathy by studying three artists in the context of the AIDS epidemic: Keith Haring, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Wolfgang Tillmans. Using assignments based in narrative pedagogy, students expand their empathic response to pain and suffering. The role of visual art in health humanities pedagogy is discussed.
February 23, 2018: Journal of Medical Humanities
Kirsten Arnett, Alexandra Roach, Meredith Elzy, Laura Jelsone-Swain
Empathy is a critical aspect of social behavior, and impairment in empathic processing is linked to hindered social interactions and several disorders. Despite much interest in this topic, our understanding of the developmental and neural involvement for empathic processing is limited. Recent evidence suggests the Mirror Neuron System (MNS) may play a role in this behavior, and that mu rhythm suppression found over the sensorimotor cortices may be a proxy for the MNS. Therefore, we aimed to measure mu rhythm oscillations in response to empathic processing during observation of painful action-based situations using electroencephalogram (EEG)...
February 16, 2018: Social Neuroscience
Gurpreet Singh, Christopher Newton, Kieran O'Sullivan, Andrew Soundy, Nicola R Heneghan
INTRODUCTION: Disabling chronic low back pain (CLBP) is associated with negative beliefs and behaviours, which are influenced by culture, religion and interactions with healthcare practitioners (HCPs). In the UK, HCPs encounter people from different cultures and ethnic backgrounds, with South Asian Indians (including Punjabis) forming the largest ethnic minority group. Better understanding of the beliefs and experiences of ethnic minorities with CLBP might inform effective management...
February 11, 2018: BMJ Open
Ryan P Calfee
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 8, 2018: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
Simone Kühn, Dimitrij Kugler, Katharina Schmalen, Markus Weichenberger, Charlotte Witt, Jürgen Gallinat
BACKGROUND/AIMS: It is a common concern in the research field and the community that habitual violent video gaming reduces empathy for pain in its players. However, previous fMRI studies have only compared habitual game players against control participants cross-sectionally. However the observed pattern of results may be due to a priori differences in people who become gamers and who not. In order to derive the causal conclusion that violent video game play causes desensitisation, longitudinal studies are needed...
January 31, 2018: Neuro-Signals
Quentin Vuillemin, Pierre-Eric Schwartzbrod, Pierre Pasquier, Florian Sibille, Marion Trousselard, Marie-Hélène Ferrer
Introduction: Health care delivery in military conflicts implies high-stress environments. Hemorrhage is the first cause of survivable death among combat casualties, and tourniquet application is one of the most critical lifesaving interventions on the battlefield. However, previous studies have shown high failure rates in tourniquet application. Our study aimed to assess the correlation between personality traits that may interfere with effective tourniquet application in a simulated extremity hemorrhage...
January 1, 2018: Military Medicine
Narelle J Watson, Sally A Martin, Jennifer L Keating
OBJECTIVE: To investigate patients' experience following wrist fracture, surgical repair and immobilization. DESIGN: A qualitative investigation involving individual participant interviews. SETTING: A metropolitan trauma service. SUBJECTS: In all, 31 participants were consecutively recruited from three groups within a randomized controlled trial comparing immobilization for one ( n = 11), three ( n = 10) or six weeks ( n = 10) following surgical treatment for wrist fracture...
February 1, 2018: Clinical Rehabilitation
Tom R Kupfer
According to pathogen-avoidance perspectives on disgust, injuries, gore, mutilation, or body-envelope violations elicit disgust because they have infectious potential. Here, an alternative explanation is proposed: People empathically simulate an observed injury, leading to unpleasant vicarious feelings, and for lack of a more accurate word, they describe the feelings as disgust. In Study 1, factor analysis of participants' disgust ratings showed that injury items emerged as a separate factor from pathogen items...
February 1, 2018: Emotion
Jonathan Levy, Abraham Goldstein, Maayan Pratt, Ruth Feldman
While empathy to the pain of conspecific is evolutionary-ancient and is observed in rodents and in primates, it also integrates higher-order affective representations. Yet, it is unclear whether human empathy for pain is inborn or matures during development and what neural processes underpin its maturation. Using magnetoencephalography, we monitored the brain response of children, adolescents, and adults (n = 209) to others' pain, testing the shift from childhood to adult functioning. Results indicate that children's vicarious empathy for pain operates via rudimentary sensory predictions involving alpha oscillations in somatosensory cortex, while adults' response recruits advanced mechanisms of updating sensory predictions and activating affective empathy in viceromotor cortex via higher-level representations involving beta- and gamma-band activity...
January 29, 2018: Scientific Reports
Federica Meconi, Mattia Doro, Arianna Schiano Lomoriello, Giulia Mastrella, Paola Sessa
Emotional communication often needs the integration of affective prosodic and semantic components from speech and the speaker's facial expression. Affective prosody may have a special role by virtue of its dual-nature; pre-verbal on one side and accompanying semantic content on the other. This consideration led us to hypothesize that it could act transversely, encompassing a wide temporal window involving the processing of facial expressions and semantic content expressed by the speaker. This would allow powerful communication in contexts of potential urgency such as witnessing the speaker's physical pain...
January 10, 2018: Scientific Reports
Amy C Lang, Eva C Igler, Ellen K Defenderfer, Julia Uihlein, Chasity T Brimeyer, W Hobart Davies
OBJECTIVES: Over 40% of adolescents with chronic pain report experiencing pain dismissal, which is a response from another individual that is perceived as diminishing, denying, or disbelieving an individual's report of pain. Pain dismissal by physicians often leaves patients feeling discredited, which may discourage them from seeking and receiving proper treatment for their pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the four most commonly reported types of physician pain dismissal differentially affect individuals' reactions...
January 2, 2018: Clinical Journal of Pain
Emilie Qiao-Tasserit, Corrado Corradi-Dell'Acqua, Patrik Vuilleumier
People's sensitivity to first-hand pain is affected by their ongoing emotions, with positive states (joy, amusement) exerting analgesic-like effects, and negative states (sadness, fear) often enhancing the subjective experience. It is however less clear how empathetic responses to others' pain are affected by one's own emotional state. Following embodied accounts that posit a shared representational code between self and others' states, it is plausible that pain empathy might be influenced by emotions in the same way as first-hand pain...
December 16, 2017: Neuropsychologia
Maithri Sivaraman
The purpose of the study was to use multiple exemplar training to teach empathetic responding to two children with autism. Three emotions-happiness, frustration and sadness/pain-were chosen for this purpose. Treatment consisted of verbal prompting and reinforcement of empathetic responses. Four experimenter-defined categories with discriminative stimuli were used for each emotion. The multiple exemplar component of the model consisted of teaching responses in the presence of several discriminative stimuli drawn from the predefined categories for each emotion delivered by two persons across two environments...
December 2017: Behavior Analysis in Practice
Yuan Cao, Genevieve Dingle, Gary C K Chan, Ross Cunnington
Previous studies have shown changes in empathy in patients with depression, including an elevated level of trait personal distress. This study examined if low mood causes changes in self-reported empathic distress when seeing others in pain. To test this, we conducted an initial ( n = 26) and close replication study ( n = 46) in which sad mood was induced in healthy participants (overall mean age M = 21, SD = 5, range = 18-41 years). Participants viewed and rated video stimuli inferring pain experienced by other people...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
Giovanni Laviola, Francesca Zoratto, Danilo Ingiosi, Valentina Carito, Damien Huzard, Marco Fiore, Simone Macrì
Deficits in empathy have been proposed to constitute a hallmark of several psychiatric disturbances like conduct disorder, antisocial and narcissistic personality disorders. Limited sensitivity to punishment, shallow or deficient affect and reduced physiological reactivity to environmental stressors have been often reported to co-occur with limited empathy and contribute to the onset of antisocial phenotypes. Empathy in its simplest form (i.e. emotional contagion) is addressed in preclinical models through the evaluation of the social transmission of emotional states: mice exposed to a painful stimulus display a higher response if in the presence of a familiar individual experiencing a higher degree of discomfort, than in isolation...
2017: PloS One
Kai Karos, Ann Meulders, Liesbet Goubert, Johan W S Vlaeyen
Only one published study has investigated the effect of a threatening social context on the perception and expression of pain, showing that social threat leads to increased pain reports but reduced nonverbal pain expression. The current study aimed to replicate and extend these findings to further explore the effects of a threatening social context. Healthy, female participants (N = 71) received 10 electrocutaneous stimuli delivered by a confederate. They were led to believe that the confederate was requested to administer 10 painful stimuli (control group) or that the confederate deliberately chose to deliver 10 painful stimuli when given the choice to deliver between 1 to 10 painful stimuli (social threat group)...
March 2018: Journal of Pain: Official Journal of the American Pain Society
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