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Internet addiction

Manoj Kumar Sharma, Thamil Selvan Palanichamy
Increase in the use of technology has led to an increase in various kinds of technological addictions. A range of psychological and behavioural theories has been proposed to explain technology addictions. These include learning theories, reward-deficiency hypothesis, impulsivity, cognitive-behavioural models and social skills deficiency theories. While no particular form of psychological intervention has been suggested as being the golden standard for its treatment, the most frequently investigated approaches have been cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and motivational enhancement therapy...
February 2018: Indian Journal of Psychiatry
Jory Deleuze, Jiang Long, Tie-Qiao Liu, Pierre Maurage, Joël Billieux
A criticism of current diagnostic approaches to gaming disorder is that they fail to take into account that high and repeated engagement is not problematic per se, nor is it necessarily associated with adverse consequences. To tackle this controversy, we used Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to test, in regular gamers (N = 268), whether high (but healthy) engagement can be distinguished from problematic engagement by using the Addiction-Engagement Questionnaire (Charlton & Danforth, 2007). We then tested whether differential relationships exist between the engagement and addiction constructs, DSM-5 criteria for Internet gaming disorder (IGD), and psychological factors linked to gaming use and misuse (self-reported impulsivity, motives to play, and depression)...
February 27, 2018: Addictive Behaviors
Verena Vogel, Ines Kollei, Theodora Duka, Jan Snagowski, Matthias Brand, Astrid Müller, Sabine Loeber
At present, there is a considerable lack of human studies that investigated the impact of conditioned cues on instrumental responding although these processes are considered as core mechanisms contributing to the development and maintenance of addictive behaviours. No studies are available that assessed these processes with regard to Internet gaming or Internet shopping applications. We thus developed a Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer (PIT)-Paradigm implementing appetitive stimuli related to Internet gaming and Internet shopping applications and investigated whether an outcome-specific PIT-Effect is observed...
March 6, 2018: Behavioural Brain Research
Xavier Carbonell, Andrés Chamarro, Ursula Oberst, Beatriz Rodrigo, Mariona Prades
It has been more than a decade since a concern about the addictive use of the Internet and mobile phones was first expressed, and its possible inclusion into the lists of mental disorders has recently become a popular topic of scientific discussion. Thus, it seems to be a fitting moment to investigate the prevalence of this issue over time. The aim of the present study was to analyze the prevalence of the perception of problematic Internet and smartphone use in young people over the period 2006-2017. To this end, a questionnaire on Internet use habits and two questionnaires on the negative consequences of Internet and smartphone use were administered to a sample of 792 university students...
March 8, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Robert D Ashford, Kevin Lynch, Brenda Curtis
BACKGROUND: Substance use disorder research and practice have not yet taken advantage of emerging changes in communication patterns. While internet and social media use is widespread in the general population, little is known about how these mediums are used in substance use disorder treatment. OBJECTIVE: The aims of this paper were to provide data on patients' with substance use disorders mobile phone ownership rates, usage patterns on multiple digital platforms (social media, internet, computer, and mobile apps), and their interest in the use of these platforms to monitor personal recovery...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Hyera Ryu, Ji-Yoon Lee, Aruem Choi, Sunyoung Park, Dai-Jin Kim, Jung-Seok Choi
Background: This study aimed to explore relationships between impulsivity, interpersonal relationships, depression, and Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) symptoms. Methods: A total of 118 young adults participated in this study: 67 IGD patients who met five or more of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for IGD and 56 healthy controls. We administered questionnaires to assess IGD symptoms (Young's Internet Addiction Test; Y-IAT), impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11), interpersonal relationship (Relationship Change Scale; RCS), and depression (Beck Depression Inventory; BDI)...
March 6, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Gulzade Uysal, Serap Balci
This study aimed to evaluate a school-based program for Internet addiction, the Healthy Internet Use Program, with adolescents in Turkey. Forty-one students were included in the intervention group, and the control group was composed of 43 students. All students were from two primary schools. Students in the intervention group participated in the Healthy Internet Use Program, which was developed in accordance with the literature. The intervention group was given eight training sessions over a 3-month period, and their parents were given two training and consultancy sessions...
January 2018: Journal of Addictions Nursing
Jorge Saraiva, Graça Esgalhado, Henrique Pereira, Samuel Monteiro, Rosa Marina Afonso, Manuel Loureiro
This study aimed to compare emotional intelligence (EI) levels and Internet addiction (IA) by gender and age groups and to assess the predictive relationship between EI and IA. One thousand four hundred thirteen young people and adults participated in the study. Participants were between 17 and 81 years old (M = 38.70 years old, SD = 13.72 years old); 42.2% were male, whereas 57.5% were female. We used a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Schutte Emotional Intelligence Scale (Schutte, Malouff, & Bhullar, 2009), and the Internet Addiction Test (Young, 1998) as data collection instruments...
January 2018: Journal of Addictions Nursing
David N Greenfield
Internet and video game addiction has been a steadily developing consequence of modern living. Behavioral and process addictions and particularly Internet and video game addiction require specialized treatment protocols and techniques. Recent advances in addiction medicine have improved our understanding of the neurobiology of substance and behavioral addictions. Novel research has expanded the ways we understand and apply well-established addiction treatments as well as newer therapies specific to Internet and video game addiction...
April 2018: Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America
Clifford J Sussman, James M Harper, Jessica L Stahl, Paul Weigle
In the past 2 decades, there has been substantial increase in availability and use of digital technologies, including the Internet, computer games, smart phones, and social media. Behavioral addiction to use of technologies spawned a body of related research. The recent inclusion of Internet gaming disorder as a condition for further study in the DSM-V invigorated a new wave of researchers, thereby expanding our understanding of these conditions. This article reviews current research, theory, and practice regarding the diagnosis, epidemiology, and neurobiology of Internet and video game addictions...
April 2018: Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America
Phoenix K H Mo, Virginia W Y Chan, Samuel W Chan, Joseph T F Lau
INTRODUCTION: Internet addiction is prevalent among adolescents and is associated with various negative outcomes. Relatively few studies examined the role of emotion dysregulation and social support on Internet addiction in this population. The present examined the association between emotion dysregulation, social support, and Internet addiction among junior secondary school students in Hong Kong. The mediating role of emotion dysregulation and Internet use on the relationship between social support and Internet addiction and the gender difference in such association were also tested...
January 31, 2018: Addictive Behaviors
Chelsey R Wilks, Anita Lungu, Sin Yee Ang, Brandon Matsumiya, Qingqing Yin, Marsha M Linehan
BACKGROUND: Given that alcohol misuse elevates risk of suicide death among ideators, the paucity of treatment outcome research for individuals presenting with both suicide ideation and problem drinking is particularly troubling. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) skills training, which effectively targets behaviors associated with emotion dysregulation including addictive and suicidal behaviors, provides a fitting model amenable to computerization. As stigma and scarcity stand as potential barriers to treatment, online dissemination platforms provide means for efficient treatment delivery that can augment the utility of suitable interventions...
February 17, 2018: Journal of Affective Disorders
Joshua B Grubbs, Joshua A Wilt, Julie J Exline, Kenneth I Pargament
In recent years, several works have reported on perceived addiction to internet pornography, or the potential for some individuals to label their own use of pornography as compulsive or out of control. Such works have consistently found that perceived addiction is related to concerning outcomes such as psychological distress, relational distress, and other addictive behaviors. However, very little work has specifically examined whether or not perceived addiction is actually related to increased use of pornography, cross-sectionally or over time...
February 26, 2018: Addictive Behaviors
David A Ellis, Linda K Kaye, Thomas D W Wilcockson, Francesca C Ryding
Griffiths' (2017) response to the recent commentary piece by Ryding and Kaye (2017) on "Internet Addiction: A conceptual minefield" provided a useful critique and extension of some key issues. We take this opportunity to further build upon on one of these issues to provide some further insight into how the field of "internet addiction" (IA) or technological addictions more generally, may benefit from capitalising on behavioural data. As such, this response extends Griffiths' (2007) points surrounding the efficacy of behavioural data previously used in studies on problematic gambling, to consider its merit for future research on IA or associated topics such as Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) or "Smartphone addiction"...
2018: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction
Mark D Griffiths
The recent commentary paper by Ryding and Kaye Journal of Mental Health and Addictio n (doi 10.1007/s11469-017-9811-6, 2017) rightly claimed that "internet addiction" (IA) is a conceptual minefield and raised some important issues for researchers and treatment providers working in the online addiction field. In the present commentary paper, some of the assertions made by Ryding and Kaye are briefly critiqued and extended. More specifically, the present paper (i) examines IA and Internet-based addictions and argues that IA is now a misnomer, (ii) examines IA and its relationship to Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) and argues IA and IGD are two completely different constructs, and that IGD is a sub-type of gaming disorder rather than a sub-type of IA, (iii) argues that the time spent engaging in online activities is not a good criterion for assessing online addictions and that the context of use is far more important criterion, and (iv) argues that those researchers working in the IA field can learn a lot from the problem gambling field in collecting robust data...
2018: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction
Francesca C Ryding, Linda K Kaye
With Internet connectivity and technological advancement increasing dramatically in recent years, "Internet addiction" (IA) is emerging as a global concern. However, the use of the term 'addiction' has been considered controversial, with debate surfacing as to whether IA merits classification as a psychiatric disorder as its own entity, or whether IA occurs in relation to specific online activities through manifestation of other underlying disorders. Additionally, the changing landscape of Internet mobility and the contextual variations Internet access can hold has further implications towards its conceptualisation and measurement...
2018: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction
Sun-Yi Yang, Hee-Soon Kim
OBJECTIVES: This study explored the effects of a self-regulatory efficacy improvement program on self-control, self-efficacy, internet addiction, and time spent on the internet among middle school students in South Korea. The program was led by school nurses, and it is integrated self-efficacy and self-regulation promotion strategies based on Bandura's social cognitive theory. DESIGN AND SAMPLE: A quasi-experimental, nonequivalent, control group, pre-posttest design was used...
February 21, 2018: Public Health Nursing
Kagan Kircaburun, Mark D Griffiths
Background and aims Recent research has suggested that social networking site use can be addictive. Although extensive research has been carried out on potential addiction to social networking sites, such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Tinder, only one very small study has previously examined potential addiction to Instagram. Consequently, the objectives of this study were to examine the relationships between personality, self-liking, daily Internet use, and Instagram addiction, as well as exploring the mediating role of self-liking between personality and Instagram addiction using path analysis...
February 20, 2018: Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Konstantinos Ioannidis, Matthias S Treder, Samuel R Chamberlain, Franz Kiraly, Sarah A Redden, Dan J Stein, Christine Lochner, Jon E Grant
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Problematic internet use (PIU; otherwise known as Internet Addiction) is a growing problem in modern societies. There is scarce knowledge of the demographic variables and specific internet activities associated with PIU and a limited understanding of how PIU should be conceptualized. Our aim was to identify specific internet activities associated with PIU and explore the moderating role of age and gender in those associations. METHODS: We recruited 1749 participants aged 18 and above via media advertisements in an Internet-based survey at two sites, one in the US, and one in South Africa; we utilized Lasso regression for the analysis...
February 12, 2018: Addictive Behaviors
Michelle Colder Carras, Anne Marie Porter, Antonius J Van Rooij, Daniel King, Amanda Lange, Matthew Carras, Alain Labrique
In response to calls for further research into the phenomenology of Internet gaming disorder (IGD), we used a community-engaged consensus development approach to evaluate how members of the "gamer culture" describe problematic gaming and the relationship of these descriptions to the proposed IGD criteria. Two focus groups of gamers were recruited at a video game convention. Participants were asked to submit suggestions for signs of game "addiction". Participants discussed and ranked the criteria in order of conceptual importance...
February 2018: Computers in Human Behavior
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