Read by QxMD icon Read

Animal Allergy

Paul C Schröder, Sabina Illi, Vera I Casaca, Anna Lluis, Andreas Böck, Caroline Roduit, Martin Depner, Remo Frei, Jon Genuneit, Petra Ina Pfefferle, Marjut Roponen, Juliane Weber, Charlotte Braun-Fahrländer, Josef Riedler, Jean-Charles Dalphin, Juha Pekkanen, Roger Lauener, Erika von Mutius, Bianca Schaub, Anne Hyvärinen, Anne M Karvonen, Maija-Riitta Hirvonen, Pekka Tiittanen, Sami Remes, Vincent Kaulek, Marie-Laure Dalphin, Markus J Ege, Georg J Loss, Harald Renz, Gert Doekes, Michael Kabesch
BACKGROUND: Farm exposure protects against development of allergies early in life. At 4.5 years, protection against asthma by farm-milk exposure was partially mediated by regulatory T-cells (Tregs). The aim of this study was to investigate the critical time window of the "asthma-protective" farm effect via Tregs during childhood immune maturation. METHODS: Tregs were assessed longitudinally at 4.5 and 6 years in 111 children (56 farm, 55 reference children) from the PASTURE/EFRAIM birth cohort (flow-cytometry)...
October 12, 2016: Allergy
Masamichi Yamashita
Aspirin is the oldest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and it sometimes causes asthma-like symptoms known as aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which can be serious. Unwanted effects of aspirin (aspirin intolerance) are also observed in patients with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, a type I allergy disease, and aspirin-induced urticaria (AIU). However the target and the mechanism of the aspirin intolerance are still unknown. There is no animal or cellular model of AERD, because its pathophysiological mechanism is still unknown, but it is thought that inhibition of cyclooxygenase by causative agents lead to an increase of free arachidonic acid, which is metabolized into cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) that provoke airway smooth muscle constriction and asthma symptoms...
October 5, 2016: Current Drug Targets
Moisés A Calderón, Carmen Vidal, Pablo Rodríguez Del Río, Jocelyne Just, Oliver Pfaar, Ana I Tabar, Inmaculada Sánchez-Machín, Petra Bubel, Jesus Borja, Peter Eberle, Rainer Reiber, Michel Bouvier, Alain Lepelliez, Ludger Klimek, Pascal Demoly
BACKGROUND: Outside clinical trials, data on systemic reactions (SRs) due to allergen immunotherapy (AIT) are scarce. METHODS: A prospective, longitudinal, web-based survey of "real-life" respiratory allergen immunotherapy (AIT) clinical practice was conducted in France, Germany and Spain. SRs were recorded and coded according to the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) and risk factors associated with SRs were identified. RESULTS: A total of 4,316 patients (corresponding to 4,363 ongoing courses of AIT) were included...
October 8, 2016: Allergy
Sarah S Killingbeck, Moyar Q Ge, Angela Haczku
Immunotherapy has been employed with great success in the form of vaccination to combat viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection. In this issue of Allergy, Cabauatan et al. describe a novel method of allergen specific immunotherapy using epicutaneous patch vaccination with the recombinant birch pollen antigen Bet v 1 in combination with a heat-labile Escherichia coli toxin (LT) as adjuvant. Patch vaccination with rBet v 1 + LT augmented production of IgG instead of IgE antibodies, inhibiting rBet v 1 sensitization in outbred guinea pigs...
October 7, 2016: Allergy
Ana B Blázquez, M Cecilia Berin
Food allergy is a common disease affecting approximately 8% of children and 5% of adults. The prevalence has increased over the last two decades, suggesting an important environmental contribution to susceptibility. Studies have identified mode of birth, pet exposure, and having older siblings as being significant risk modifying factors in the development of food allergy. With the discovery that these factors significantly impact the composition of the intestinal microbiome, which is known to play a critical role in shaping the immune system, recent studies have begun to address the role of the intestinal microbiota in the development of food allergy...
September 13, 2016: Translational Research: the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
Dan Xu, Yingshuo Wang, Zhimin Chen, Shuxian Li, Yungai Cheng, Li Zhang, Lingzhi Zhao
BACKGROUND: Asthma is a global problem. Prevalence varies among different countries and cities. We aimed to obtain the prevalence, describe the characteristics, and discover factors that may relate to asthma in Hangzhou. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Hangzhou. The subjects were children aged 14 years and younger. A control group of non-asthma children that matched in age and sex with each asthmatic patient was also randomly selected and interviewed...
September 27, 2016: Respiratory Research
Eva Rönmark, Katja Warm, Anders Bjerg, Helena Backman, Linnea Hedman, Bo Lundbäck
BACKGROUND: Longitudinal population-based studies about the natural history of allergic sensitization are rare. The aim was to study incidence and persistence of airborne allergen sensitization up to young adulthood, and risk factors for early and late onset of sensitization. METHODS: All children aged 7-8 years in two municipalities in Northern Sweden were invited to a parental questionnaire and skin prick tests (SPT) to ten airborne allergens, and 2,148 (88%) participated...
September 23, 2016: Allergy
Enrica Zucca, Emanuela Corsini, Valentina Galbiati, Anna Lange-Consiglio, Francesco Ferrucci
BACKGROUND: Data obtained in both animal models and clinical trials suggest that cell-based therapies represent a potential therapeutic strategy for lung repair and remodeling. Recently, new therapeutic approaches based on the use of stem cell derivatives (e.g., conditioned medium (CM) and microvesicles (MVs)) to regenerate tissues and improve their functions were proposed. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of equine amniotic mesenchymal cell derivatives on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine production in equine alveolar macrophages, which may be beneficial in lung inflammatory disorders such as recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) in horses...
2016: Stem Cell Research & Therapy
Willem S Lexmond, Jeremy A Goettel, Jonathan J Lyons, Justin Jacobse, Marion M Deken, Monica G Lawrence, Thomas H DiMaggio, Daniel Kotlarz, Elizabeth Garabedian, Paul Sackstein, Celeste C Nelson, Nina Jones, Kelly D Stone, Fabio Candotti, Edmond H H M Rings, Adrian J Thrasher, Joshua D Milner, Scott B Snapper, Edda Fiebiger
In addition to the infectious consequences of immunodeficiency, patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) often suffer from poorly understood exaggerated immune responses that result in autoimmunity and elevated levels of serum IgE. Here, we have shown that WAS patients and mice deficient in WAS protein (WASP) frequently develop IgE-mediated reactions to common food allergens. WASP-deficient animals displayed an adjuvant-free IgE-sensitization to chow antigens that was most pronounced for wheat and soy and occurred under specific pathogen-free as well as germ-free housing conditions...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Clinical Investigation
T Banti, A Carsin, B Chabrol, R Reynaud, A Fabre
: Infant food diversification has undergone a rapid succession of good practice recommendations in France, but there has been no assessment of pediatrician practices on food diversification. OBJECTIVE: To assess the practices of pediatricians in relation to current recommendations of the French Society of Pediatrics on infant food diversification. METHODS: This was an observational study conducted from 1 November 2014 to 31 March 2015. The study population consisted of 97 pediatricians in the Var department and 84 pediatric residents assigned to the University of Aix-Marseille in France...
October 2016: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
A-S Halling-Overgaard, S Kezic, I Jakasa, K A Engebretsen, H Maibach, J P Thyssen
Patients with atopic dermatitis have skin barrier impairment in both lesional and non-lesional skin. They are typically exposed to emollients daily and topical anti-inflammatory medicaments intermittently, hereby increasing the risk of developing contact allergy and systemic exposed to chemicals ingredients found in these topical preparations. We systematically searched for studies that investigated skin absorption of various penetrants, including medicaments, in atopic dermatitis patients, but also animals with experimentally induced dermatitis...
September 17, 2016: British Journal of Dermatology
King-Thom Chung
Synthetic azo dyes are widely used in industries. Gerhardt Domagk discovered that the antimicrobial effect of red azo dye Prontosil was due to the reductively cleaved (azo reduction) product sulfanilamine. The significance of azo reduction is thus revealed. Azo reduction can be accomplished by human intestinal microflora, skin microflora, environmental microorganisms, to a lesser extent by human liver azoreductase, and by non-biological means. Some azo dyes can be carcinogenic without being cleaved into aromatic amines...
September 16, 2016: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part C, Environmental Carcinogenesis & Ecotoxicology Reviews
Na-Kyoung Lee, Hyun-Dong Paik
This review discusses the status, antimicrobial mechanisms, application, and regulation of natural preservatives in livestock food systems. Conventional preservatives are synthetic chemical substances including nitrates/nitrites, sulfites, sodium benzoate, propyl gallate, and potassium sorbate. The use of artificial preservatives is being reconsidered because of concerns relating to headache, allergies, and cancer. As the demand for biopreservation in food systems has increased, new natural antimicrobial compounds of various origins are being developed, including plant-derived products (polyphenolics, essential oils, plant antimicrobial peptides (pAMPs)), animal-derived products (lysozymes, lactoperoxidase, lactoferrin, ovotransferrin, antimicrobial peptide (AMP), chitosan and others), and microbial metabolites (nisin, natamycin, pullulan, ε-polylysine, organic acid, and others)...
2016: Korean Journal for Food Science of Animal Resources
Chong Han Pek, Crystal Shuk Jin Cheong, Yan Lin Yap, Stephen Doggett, Thiam Chye Lim, Wei Chen Ong, Jane Lim
BACKGROUND: Ticks are blood-sucking arachnids that feed on all classes of vertebrates, including humans. Ixodes holocyclus, also known as the Australian Paralysis Tick, is capable of causing a myriad of clinical issues in humans and companion animals, including the transmission of infectious agents, toxin-mediated paralysis, allergic and inflammatory reactions, and mammalian meat allergies in humans. The Australian Paralysis Tick is endemic to Australia, and only two other exported cases have been reported in the literature...
September 8, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
George Plitas, Alexander Y Rudensky
The immune system of vertebrate animals has evolved to mount an effective defense against a diverse set of pathogens while minimizing transient or lasting impairment in tissue function that could result from the inflammation caused by immune responses to infectious agents. In addition, misguided immune responses to "self" and dietary antigens, as well as to commensal microorganisms, can lead to a variety of inflammatory disorders, including autoimmunity, metabolic syndrome, allergies, and cancer. Regulatory T cells expressing the X chromosome-linked transcription factor Foxp3 suppress inflammatory responses in diverse biological settings and serve as a vital mechanism of negative regulation of immune-mediated inflammation...
September 2, 2016: Cancer Immunology Research
Giuseppe di Mauro, Roberto Bernardini, Salvatore Barberi, Annalisa Capuano, Antonio Correra, Gian Luigi De' Angelis, Iride Dello Iacono, Maurizio de Martino, Daniele Ghiglioni, Dora Di Mauro, Marcello Giovannini, Massimo Landi, Gian Luigi Marseglia, Alberto Martelli, Vito Leonardo Miniello, Diego Peroni, Lucilla Ricottini Maria Giuseppa Sullo, Luigi Terracciano, Cristina Vascone, Elvira Verduci, Maria Carmen Verga, Elena Chiappini
BACKGROUND: Allergic sensitization in children and allergic diseases arising therefrom are increasing for decades. Several interventions, functional foods, pro- and prebiotics, vitamins are proposed for the prevention of allergies and they can't be uncritically adopted. OBJECTIVE: This Consensus document was developed by the Italian Society of Preventive and Social Paediatrics and the Italian Society of Paediatric Allergy and Immunology. The aim is to provide updated recommendations regarding allergy prevention in children...
2016: World Allergy Organization Journal
Katja Radon, Dennis Nowak, Christian Vogelberg, Franziska Ruëff
BACKGROUND: One-third of all young persons entering the work force have a history of atopic disease. Occupationally induced allergy and asthma generally arise in the first few months on the job, while pre-existing symptoms tend to worsen. Young persons with a history of an atopic disease should receive evidence-based advice before choosing a career. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed for cohort studies investigating the new onset of asthma, rhinitis, or hand eczema among job trainees from before the start of training and onward into the first few years on the job...
August 8, 2016: Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
Pamela J Schreiner
Animals interact with humans in multiple ways, including as therapy and service animals, commercially as livestock, as wildlife, and in zoos. But the most common interaction is as companion animals in our homes, with an estimated 180 million cats and dogs living in US households. While pet ownership has been reported to have many health benefits, the findings are inconsistent. Cardiovascular risk factors such as lipids, glucose, obesity, and heart rate variability have improved, worsened, or remained the same in the limited number of studies considering companion animals...
February 2016: Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports
Madhavi Singh, Amy Hays
In last 30 to 40 years there has been a significant increase in the incidence of allergy. This increase cannot be explained by genetic factors alone. Increasing air pollution and its interaction with biological allergens along with changing lifestyles are contributing factors. Dust mites, molds, and animal allergens contribute to most of the sensitization in the indoor setting. Tree and grass pollens are the leading allergens in the outdoor setting. Worsening air pollution and increasing particulate matter worsen allergy symptoms and associated morbidity...
September 2016: Primary Care
Elizabeth Huiwen Tham, Alison Joanne Lee, Hugo Van Bever
Allergic diseases are on the rise in Asia. Aeroallergen exposure is a strong risk factor for sensitization, development and severity of atopic diseases, especially in the Asian paediatric population. Geographical and seasonal variations in aeroallergen sensitization are seen even within Asian countries and changes in aeroallergen sensitization patterns have been observed over time. Some possible reasons include climate change as well as rapid urbanization and improved sanitation which follow socioeconomic development...
September 2016: Asian Pacific Journal of Allergy and Immunology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"