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emergency department sedation

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28500785/don-t-label-me-a-qualitative-study-of-patients-perceptions-and-experiences-of-sedation-during-behavioral-emergency-in-the-emergency-department
#1
Celene Y L Yap, Jonathan C Knott, David C M Kong, Marie Gerdtz, Kay Stewart, David McD Taylor
OBJECTIVES: Behavioral emergencies are commonly seen in emergency departments. Acutely agitated patients can be difficult to manage and sedation may be required to decrease dangerous behavior and to ensure the safety of both the patient and staff. While the experience of staff caring for this population has been reported, patients' experiences with their overall management remains unknown. We aimed to describe the perceptions and experiences of patients regarding the use of sedation during acute behavioral emergencies...
May 13, 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28489008/-do-opioids-sedatives-and-proton-pump-inhibitors-increase-the-risk-of-fractures
#2
Gudlaug Thorsdottir, Elisabet Benedikz, Sigridur A Thorgeirsdottir, Magnus Johannsson
INTRODUCTION: A pharmacoepidemiological study was conducted to analyse the relationship between bone fracture and the use of certain drugs. MATERIAL/METHODS: The study includes patients 40 years and older, diagnosed with bone fractures in the Emergency Department of Landspitali University Hospital in Reykjavik, Iceland, during a 10-year period (2002-2011). Also were included those who picked up from a pharmacy 90 DDD or more per year of the drugs included in the study in the capital region of Iceland during same period...
May 2017: Læknablađiđ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28476551/emergency-department-visits-involving-benzodiazepines-and-non-benzodiazepine-receptor-agonists
#3
Christopher N Kaufmann, Adam P Spira, G Caleb Alexander, Lainie Rutkow, Ramin Mojtabai
OBJECTIVE: Sedative-hypnotic medications (e.g., Benzodiazepines [BZDs] and non-benzodiazepine receptor agonists [nBZRAs]) are associated with adverse events, especially in the elderly, that may require emergency department (ED) treatment. This study assessed outcomes from ED visits attributed to BZDs and/or nBZRAs, and variations in these associations by age group. METHODS: Data came from the 2004-2011 waves of the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN). Visits were categorized as involving: (1) BZDs-only, (2) nBZRAs-only, (3) combination of BZDs and nBZRAs, or (4) any other sedative-hypnotic medication...
April 14, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28466184/thirty-day-emergency-room-visits-and-hospital-admissions-after-outpatient-non-vascular-image-guided-procedures
#4
Quang Nguyen, Sahil V Mehta, Jieming Fang, Robert Sheiman, Robert Kane, Muneeb Ahmed, Ammar Sarwar, Bettina Siewert, Olga R Brook
PURPOSE: To evaluate the rate of post-procedure emergency department (ED) visits and hospital admissions following outpatient non-vascular image-guided interventions performed under moderate sedation and to identify common and preventable causes of emergency department visits and hospital admissions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Institutional review board approval was acquired for this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study with waiver of informed consent. 1426 consecutive patients undergoing 1512 outpatient image-guided procedures under moderate sedation from November 2012 to August 2014 were included...
May 2, 2017: Abdominal Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28460809/ultrasound-guided-interscalene-nerve-block-vs-procedural-sedation-by-propofol-and-fentanyl-for-anterior-shoulder-dislocations
#5
Esmaeil Raeyat Doost, Mohammad Mehdi Heiran, Mitra Movahedi, Amirhossein Mirafzal
BACKGROUND: Few studies were performed to compare ultrasound guided brachial plexus block with procedural sedation for reduction of shoulder dislocations in the Emergency Department (ED). This study was done to provide further evidence regarding this comparison. METHODS: This was a randomized clinical trial performed on patients presenting with anterior shoulder dislocations to the emergency department of an academic level 2 trauma center. Exclusion criteria were any contraindications to the drugs used, any patient which may not be potentially assigned into both groups because of an underlying medical condition, presence of neurovascular compromise related to the dislocation, presence of concomitant fractures, and patient refusal to participate in the study...
April 14, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28457743/the-information-needs-of-patients-receiving-procedural-sedation-in-a-hospital-emergency-department
#6
Sue Revell, Judy Searle, Shona Thompson
This research investigated the information needs of patients receiving ED procedural sedation to determine the best format to consistently deliver key information in a way acceptable to all involved. Of particular interest was the question concerning patients' need for receiving written information. A descriptive exploratory study gathered qualitative data through face-to-face interviews and focus groups involving patients, nurses and medical staff. Individual interviews were conducted with eight adult patients following procedural sedation...
April 27, 2017: International Emergency Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28457093/deliberate-self-harm-in-older-adults-a-general-hospital-emergency-department-survey
#7
Irina Briskman, Assaf Shelef, Uri Berger, Yehuda Baruch, Gali Bar, Jack Asherov, Artur Lvovski, Alan Apter, Yoram Barak
BACKGROUND: Deliberate self-harm (DSH) increases the danger of future suicide death and the risk increases with age. Self-harm in older adults is often associated with greater suicidal intent and lethality. OBJECTIVES: To investigate clinical and psychosocial variables of older patients (age ≥ 65 years) assessed due to DSH, compared with younger adults. METHODS: Patients admitted to the Emergency Department following DSH during an 8 year period were included...
March 2017: Israel Medical Association Journal: IMAJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438447/randomized-clinical-trial-of-propofol-versus-alfentanil-for-moderate-procedural-sedation-in-the-emergency-department
#8
James R Miner, Brian E Driver, Johanna C Moore, Erik Faegerstrom, Lauren Klein, Matthew Prekker, Jon B Cole
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To compare the frequency of airway and respiratory adverse events leading to an intervention between moderate sedation using alfentanil or propofol. METHODS: We performed a randomized clinical trial in which adults undergoing moderate sedation in the ED received either alfentanil or propofol. Our primary outcome was the frequency of airway and respiratory adverse events leading to an intervention. Other outcomes included sedation depth, efficacy, sedation time, patient satisfaction, pain, and satisfaction...
April 21, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433211/adverse-events-during-a-randomized-trial-of-ketamine-versus-co-administration-of-ketamine-and-propofol-for-procedural-sedation-in-a-pediatric-emergency-department
#9
Keith Weisz, Lalit Bajaj, Sara J Deakyne, Lina Brou, Alison Brent, Joseph Wathen, Genie E Roosevelt
BACKGROUND: The co-administration of ketamine and propofol (CoKP) is thought to maximize the beneficial profile of each medication, while minimizing the respective adverse effects of each medication. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to compare adverse events between ketamine monotherapy (KM) and CoKP for procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) in a pediatric emergency department (ED). METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, controlled trial of KM vs...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28416265/comparison-of-outcomes-for-pediatric-paraphimosis-reduction-using-topical-anesthetic-versus-intravenous-procedural-sedation
#10
Brett Burstein, Raphael Paquin
BACKGROUND: Paraphimosis is an acute urologic emergency requiring urgent manual reduction, frequently necessitating procedural sedation (PS) in the pediatric population. The present study sought to compare outcomes among pediatric patients undergoing paraphimosis reduction using a novel topical anesthetic (TA) technique versus PS. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients <18years old, presenting to a tertiary pediatric ED requiring analgesia for paraphimosis reduction between October 2013 and September 2016...
April 11, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28398941/the-season-of-hoverboards-a-case-series-of-fractures
#11
Chester J Donnally, Charles M Lawrie, Augustus J Rush, Avi C Baitner
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify the types of pediatric orthopedic extremity fractures that are sustained as a result of hoverboard (self-balancing, self-propelling, 2-wheeled boards) use. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of all orthopedic consultations from the emergency department at our institution from December 1 to 31, 2015. Data was collected on the injury mechanism, fracture location, management, and patient characteristics including sex, age, and hand dominance...
May 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28395927/correction-correction-to-clinical-policy-procedural-sedation-and-analgesia-in-the-emergency%C3%A2-department-annals-of-emergency-medicine-63-2014-247-258-e18
#12
Steven A Godwin, John H Burton, Charles J Gerardo, Benjamin W Hatten, Sharon E Mace, Scott M Silvers, Francis M Fesmire
Due to a miscommunication during the process of transferring this manuscript from our editorial team to Production, the Members of the American College of Emergency Physicians Clinical Policies Committee (Oversight Committee) were not properly indexed in PubMed. This has now been corrected online. The publisher would like to apologize for any inconvenience caused.
April 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28371459/patient-satisfaction-with-procedural-sedation-in-the-emergency-department
#13
Olivia G Johnson, David McD Taylor, Marina Lee, Juen-Li Ding, Aadith Ashok, Damian Johnson, Daniel Peck, Jonathan Knott, Laurence Weinberg
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine patient satisfaction with procedural sedation as a function of nature of the procedure and depth of sedation. METHOD: We undertook a prospective observational study of adult patients who received procedural sedation in two EDs (20 month period). The level of sedation was determined by an investigator, using the Observers Assessment of Anaesthesia/Sedation Scale (1 = awake to 6 = no response to noxious stimuli)...
March 29, 2017: Emergency Medicine Australasia: EMA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28366351/when-to-pick-the-nose-out-of-hospital-and-emergency-department-intranasal-administration-of-medications
#14
REVIEW
Megan A Rech, Brian Barbas, Whitney Chaney, Elizabeth Greenhalgh, Charles Turck
The intranasal route for medication administration is increasingly popular in the emergency department and out-of-hospital setting because such administration is simple and fast, and can be used for patients without intravenous access and in situations in which obtaining an intravenous line is difficult or time intensive (eg, for patients who are seizing or combative). Several small studies (mostly pediatric) have shown midazolam to be effective for procedural sedation, anxiolysis, and seizures. Intranasal fentanyl demonstrates both safety and efficacy for the management of acute pain...
March 25, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28350723/reasons-for-interfacility-emergency-department-transfer-and-care-at-the-receiving-facility
#15
Joyce Li, Stephanie Pryor, Ben Choi, Chris A Rees, Mamata V Senthil, Nicholas Tsarouhas, Sage R Myers, Michael C Monuteaux, Richard G Bachur
OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to (1) assess the reasons for pediatric interfacility transfers as identified by transferring providers and review the emergency medical care delivered at the receiving facilities and (2) investigate the emergency department (ED) care among the subpopulation of patients discharged from the receiving facility. METHODS: We performed a multicenter, cross-sectional survey of ED medical providers transferring patients younger than 18 years to 1 of 4 US tertiary care pediatric hospitals with a subsequent medical record review at the receiving facility...
March 27, 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334427/capnography-versus-standard-monitoring-for-emergency-department-procedural-sedation-and-analgesia
#16
REVIEW
Brian F Wall, Kirk Magee, Samuel G Campbell, Peter J Zed
BACKGROUND: Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) is used frequently in the emergency department (ED) to facilitate painful procedures and interventions. Capnography, a monitoring modality widely used in operating room and endoscopy suite settings, is being used more frequently in the ED setting with the goal of reducing cardiopulmonary adverse events. As opposed to settings outside the ED, there is currently no consensus on whether the addition of capnography to standard monitoring modalities reduces adverse events in the ED setting...
March 23, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28331860/quetiapine-misuse-and-abuse-is-it-an-atypical-paradigm-of-drug-seeking-behavior
#17
REVIEW
Sean Kim, Gayoung Lee, Eric Kim, Hyejin Jung, Jongwha Chang
Recent case reports in medical literatures suggest that more and more second-generation atypical antipsychotics (AAs) have been prescribed for off-label use; quetiapine (Brand name: Seroquel(®)) showed increase in its trend for off-label use. Little is known about the reasons behind this trend, although historical sedative and hypnotic prescription patterns suggest that despite relatively superior safety profiles of quetiapine (especially for movement disorders), it may be used for treating substance abuse disorder...
January 2017: Journal of Research in Pharmacy Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28325160/-procedural-sedation-and-analgesia-with-nitrous-oxide-for-children-in-the-emergency-department
#18
W P Kluijfhout, R T C Welsing
Procedural sedation and analgesia with nitrous oxide in children who are anxious or in pain is a relatively new type of sedation in emergency departments in the Netherlands. The gas is inhaled through a face mask and does not require intravenous access. Furthermore, nitrous oxide does not influence the circulatory and respiratory systems and airway reflexes remain intact, which means that the child does not need to be fasted. Children who are treated with nitrous oxide experience significantly less pain and discomfort compared to the application of conventional analgesia...
2017: Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28325154/the-behavioral-profile-of-methylenedioxypyrovalerone-mdpv-and-%C3%AE-pyrrolidinopentiophenone-pvp-a-systematic-review
#19
Cornel N Stanciu, Thomas M Penders, Samantha A Gnanasegaram, Elvin Pirapakaran, Juvraj S Padda, Jeeven S Padda
BACKGROUND: New psychoactive substances are emerging at an alarming rate. With novel structures and properties they produce unique behavioral characteristics during intoxication. Synthetic cathinones are some of the most common. More and more are presenting to emergency departments due to consequences of use. Aside from isolated reports, little is known about these compounds. OBJECTIVE: Here we review literature pertaining to two common synthetic cathinones, MDPV and alphaPVP, and correlate clinically with guidance on management of intoxications...
March 21, 2017: Current Drug Abuse Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28283340/a-prospective-randomized-double-dummy-trial-comparing-intravenous-push-dose-of-low-dose-ketamine-to-short-infusion-of-low-dose-ketamine-for-treatment-of-moderate-to-severe-pain-in-the-emergency-department
#20
Sergey Motov, Mo Mai, Illya Pushkar, Antonios Likourezos, Jefferson Drapkin, Matthew Yasavolian, Jason Brady, Peter Homel, Christian Fromm
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Compare adverse effects and analgesic efficacy of low-dose ketamine for acute pain in the ED administered either by single intravenous push (IVP) or short infusion (SI). METHODS: Patients 18-65, presenting to ED with acute abdominal, flank, or musculoskeletal pain with initial pain score≥5, were randomized to ketamine 0.3mg/kg by either IVP or SI with placebo double-dummy. Adverse effects were evaluated by Side Effects Rating Scale for Dissociative Anesthetics (SERSDA) and Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS) at 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120min post-administration; analgesic efficacy was evaluated by Numerical Rating Scale (NRS)...
March 3, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
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