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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28902112/the-efficacy-of-repeated-cold-water-immersion-on-recovery-following-a-simulated-rugby-union-protocol
#1
Sean Barber, Pattison John, Freddy Brown, Jessica Hill
Training and athletic competition frequently results in exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of repeated cold water immersion (CWI) on recovery following a simulated rugby union match. Sixteen male, club level rugby players were matched for body mass and randomly assigned to either a CWI group or control (CON) group. Following the simulated rugby match the CWI group underwent 2 x 5 min immersions at a temperature of 10°C separated by 2.5 min seated at room temperature, whilst the CON group remained seated for 15 min...
September 6, 2017: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28891869/chronic-exposure-to-insufficient-sleep-alters-processes-of-pain-habituation-and-sensitization
#2
Norah S Simpson, Jennifer Scott-Sutherland, Shiva Gautam, Navil Sethna, Monika Haack
Chronic pain conditions are highly co-morbid with insufficient sleep. While the mechanistic relationships between the two are not understood, chronic insufficient sleep may be one pathway through which central pain-modulatory circuits deteriorate, thereby contributing to chronic pain vulnerability over time. To test this hypothesis, an in-laboratory model of three weeks of restricted sleep with limited recovery (five nights of 4-hour sleep/night followed by two nights of 8-hour sleep/night) was compared to three weeks of 8-hour sleep/night (control protocol)...
September 1, 2017: Pain
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28885962/cold-acclimation-does-not-alter-physiological-or-perceptual-responses-during-subsequent-exercise-in-the-heat
#3
Douglas M Jones, Kaitlyn A Rostomily, Carina M Pautz, Danica W Ito, Stephen P Bailey, Bart Roelands, Michael J Buono, Romain Meeusen
INTRODUCTION: Warfighters often train and conduct operations in cold environments. Specifically, military trainees and divers that are repeatedly exposed to cold water may experience inadvertent cold acclimatization, which results in body heat retention. These same warfighters can quickly switch between environments (cold to hot or hot to cold) given the nature of their work. This may present a risk of early onset of hyperthermia when cold-acclimatized warfighters are subsequently exposed to physiological insults that increase body temperature, such as exercise and heat stress...
September 2017: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28885961/effectiveness-of-ice-sheet-cooling-following-exertional-hyperthermia
#4
Cory L Butts, Debora L Spisla, J D Adams, Cody R Smith, Kathleen M Paulsen, Aaron R Caldwell, Matthew S Ganio, Brendon P McDermott
BACKGROUND: The procedure of wrapping a heat casualty in ice-water soaked bed sheets to reduce core temperature has received little investigation, despite the practice and recommendation for its use in some military settings. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the cooling efficacy of ice-sheet cooling (ISC) following exertional hyperthermia. METHODS: 13 (11 males, 2 females) participants (age = 23 ± 3 years, height = 176.5 ± 10.3 cm, mass = 78...
September 2017: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28877129/iatrogenic-full-thickness-frostbite-injury-caused-by-the-use-of-a-conductive-cooling-device
#5
Corbin Muetterties, Eric Weiss, Sandra Tomlinson-Hansen, William Hughes
Reports of iatrogenic cold thermal injuries are rare in the literature. Conductive cooling devices, typically employed for their neuroprotective effects, use conductive hydrogel pads to achieve rapid and precise temperature control approaching the level of water immersion. Despite a number of built-in safeguards, prolonged or improper use of these devices can lead to significant thermal injury. To the best of their knowledge, the authors describe the first report of a significant iatrogenic full-thickness injury caused by the use of a surface cooling system in a patient who had recently suffered a cerebrovascular accident...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Burn Care & Research: Official Publication of the American Burn Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28859025/seizures-induced-by-exiting-water-a-unique-form-of-reflex-epilepsy
#6
Brian Appavu, Jordana Fox, Robert Little, John F Kerrigan, Makram Obeid
INTRODUCTION: Reflex epilepsies represent a form of epilepsy in which unique modes of seizure precipitation are characterized by endogenous or exogenous stimuli. Hot water epilepsy represents a subtype of reflex epilepsy in which seizure precipitation arises from the act of immersing the head with hot water. Bathing epilepsy represents another subtype of reflex epilepsy in which seizure precipitation arises from the immersion with water at lukewarm temperatures. CASE SERIES: We report on 2 boys with a unique form of bathing epilepsy characterized by the act of exiting out of water...
September 2017: Neurologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28854251/facilitatory-and-inhibitory-pain-mechanisms-are-altered-in-patients-with-carpal-tunnel-syndrome
#7
Benjamin Soon, Bill Vicenzino, Annina B Schmid, Michel W Coppieters
Preliminary evidence from studies using quantitative sensory testing suggests the presence of central mechanisms in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) as apparent by widespread hyperalgesia. Hallmarks of central mechanisms after nerve injuries include nociceptive facilitation and reduced endogenous pain inhibition. Methods to study nociceptive facilitation in CTS so far have been limited to quantitative sensory testing and the integrity of endogenous inhibition remains unexamined. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate changes in facilitatory and inhibitory processing in patients with CTS by studying hypersensitivity following experimentally induced pain (facilitatory mechanisms) and the efficacy of conditioned pain modulation (CPM, inhibitory mechanisms)...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28851323/evoked-potentials-after-painful-cutaneous-electrical-stimulation-depict-pain-relief-during-a-conditioned-pain-modulation
#8
Oliver Höffken, Özüm S Özgül, Elena K Enax-Krumova, Martin Tegenthoff, Christoph Maier
BACKGROUND: Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) evaluates the pain modulating effect of a noxious conditioning stimulus (CS) on another noxious test stimulus (TS), mostly based solely on subjective pain ratings. We used painful cutaneous electrical stimulation (PCES) to induce TS in a novel CPM-model. Additionally, to evaluate a more objective parameter, we recorded the corresponding changes of cortical evoked potentials (PCES-EP). METHODS: We examined the CPM-effect in 17 healthy subjects in a randomized controlled cross-over design during immersion of the non-dominant hand into 10 °C or 24 °C cold water (CS)...
August 29, 2017: BMC Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28847139/swimming-three-ice-miles-within-fifteen-hours
#9
Mirko Stjepanovic, Pantelis T. Nikolaidis, Beat Knechtle
Ice Mile swimming (1608 m in water of below 5 °Celsius) is becoming increasingly popular. This case study aimed to identify body core temperature and selected haematological and biochemical parameters before and after repeated Ice Miles. An experienced ice swimmer completed three consecutive Ice Miles within 15 h. Swim times, body core temperatures, and selected urinary and haematological parameters were recorded. Body core temperature reached its maximum between 5, 8 and 15 min after immersion (37.7°C, 38...
August 31, 2017: Chinese Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28833689/cold-water-immersion-kill-or-cure
#10
M J Tipton, N Collier, H Massey, J Corbett, M Harper
Like other environmental constituents such as pressure, heat and oxygen, cold water can be either good or bad, threat or treatment depending on circumstance. Given the current increase in the popularly of open cold water swimming it is timely to review the various human responses to cold water immersion (CWI) and consider the strength of the claims made for the effects of CWI. As a consequence, in this review we look at the history of CWI and examine CWI as a pre-cursor to drowning, cardiac arrest and hypothermia...
August 23, 2017: Experimental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28829536/pediatric-heat-related-illness-recommendations-for-prevention-and-management-digest
#11
Roberta J Dunn, Tommy Y Kim, Pradip Chaudhari
Infants, children, and adolescents are at increased risk for heat-related illness due to their inability to remove themselves from dangerous environments. Evidence shows that morbidity and mortality from heat illness is related to the length of time core temperature is elevated, so rapid reduction and accurate serial measurements are crucial to prevention of organ system damage and death. The primary methods of patient cooling are conduction (ice-water immersion, cold packs) and convection (moisture and moving air)...
August 22, 2017: Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28819008/effect-of-a-patent-foramen-ovale-in-humans-on-thermal-responses-to-passive-cooling-and-heating
#12
James T Davis, Madeline W Hay, Alyssa M Hardin, Matthew D White, Andrew T Lovering
Humans with a patent foramen ovale (PFO) have a higher esophageal temperature (Tesoph) than humans without a PFO (PFO-) . Thus, the presence of a PFO might also be associated with differences in thermal responsiveness to passive cooling and heating, such as shivering and hyperpnea, respectively. The purpose of this study was to determine if thermal responses to passive cooling and heating are different between PFO- subjects and subjects with a PFO (PFO+). We hypothesized that compared to PFO- subjects, PFO+ subjects would cool down more rapidly and heat up slower, and PFO+ subjects that experienced thermal hyperpnea would have a blunted increase in ventilation...
August 17, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812908/a-quantitative-assessment-of-the-risk-of-human-salmonellosis-arising-from-the-consumption-of-pecans-in-the-united-states
#13
Sofia M Santillana Farakos, Régis Pouillot, Rhoma Johnson, Judith Spungen, Insook Son, Nathan Anderson, Gordon R Davidson, Jane M Van Doren
A quantitative risk assessment was conducted to assess the risk of human salmonellosis acquired from consumption of pecans in the United States. The model considered the potential for Salmonella survival, growth, and recontamination of pecans from the sheller to the consumer, including steps such as immersion in water, drying, conditioning, cracking, partitioning, and storage. Five theoretical microbial reduction treatment levels (1 to 5 log CFU) were modeled. Data from the 2010 to 2013 surveys by the National Pecan Shellers Association were used for initial prevalence and contamination levels...
September 2017: Journal of Food Protection
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28777521/blue-fingered-diver-case-report
#14
Rebecca Cable, Lindell K Weaver, Anne B Roberts, Greg Goodman, Kayla Deru
Although Raynaud's phenomenon is a well-known consequence of exposure to cold, neither its incidence in recreational divers nor case reports in that population have been reported in the medical literature. We present a case report of the initial manifestation of primary Raynaud's phenomenon during a warm-water scuba dive. A healthy 18-year-old Caucasian male made four open-circuit compressed air scuba dives over two days in the Florida Keys to a maximum depth of 90 feet. After two of those dives, he noted painless, blue discoloration on three digits of his left hand, unaccompanied by sensory changes, which resolved within an hour of surfacing...
November 2016: Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine: Journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28767502/is-swimming-safe-in-heart-failure-a-systematic-review
#15
Parin Shah, Pierpaolo Pellicori, Alexandra Macnamara, Alessia Urbinati, Andrew L Clark
It is not clear whether swimming is safe in patients with chronic heart failure. Ten studies examining the hemodynamic effects of acute water immersion (WI) (155 patients; average age 60 years; 86% male; mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 29%) and 6 randomized controlled trials of rehabilitation comparing swimming with either medical treatment only (n=3) or cycling (n=1) or aerobic exercise (n=2), (136 patients, average age 59 years; 84% male, mean LVEF 31%) were considered. In 7 studies of warm WI (30 -35 ºC): heart rate (HR) fell (2-15%), and both cardiac output (CO) (7-37%) and stroke volume (SV) increased (13-41%)...
June 22, 2017: Cardiology in Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28764285/a-comparative-evaluation-of-the-influence-of-command-set-methods-on-microleakage-of-glass-ionomer-cement-an-in-vitro-study
#16
Sairaj Punnathara, Ramalingam Krishnakumar, Mohan Govindarajan, Momeka Kanaran, Sunil Thomas Philip, Aswin Saseendran Nair, Joby Peter
INTRODUCTION: A major challenge when using glass ionomer cement in clinical situation particularly in paediatric dentistry is to overcome the problem of microleakage. Fast or command setting of Type IX glass ionomer cement using external energy source enhances the setting reaction and results in improved initial physical and mechanical properties. AIM: To compare and evaluate the influence of ultrasonic activation, halogen light irradiation and combined effect of both on microleakage of enamel adjacent to Type IX glass ionomer restorations...
June 2017: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research: JCDR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28742305/pediatric-heat-related-illness-recommendations-for-prevention-and-management
#17
Roberta J. Dunn, Tommy Y. Kim
Infants, children, and adolescents are at increased risk for heat-related illness due to their inability to remove themselves from dangerous environments. Evidence shows that morbidity and mortality from heat illness is related to the length of time core temperature is elevated, so rapid reduction and accurate serial measurements are crucial to prevention of organ system damage and death. The primary methods of patient cooling are conduction (ice-water immersion, cold packs) and convection (moisture and moving air)...
August 2017: Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28733312/baseline-aortic-pulse-wave-velocity-is-associated-with-central-and-peripheral-pressor-responses-during-the-cold-pressor-test-in-healthy-subjects
#18
Anastasiya Borner, Kyle Murray, Claire Trotter, James Pearson
Cold environmental temperatures increase sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure, and increase the risk of acute cardiovascular events in aged individuals. The acute risk of cardiovascular events increases with aortic pulse wave velocity as well as elevated central and peripheral pulse pressures. The aim of this study was to examine the independent influence of aortic pulse wave velocity upon central and peripheral pressor responses to sympathetic activation via the cold pressor test (CPT). Twenty-two healthy subjects (age: 18-73 years) completed a CPT with the left hand immersed in 2-4°C water for 3 min...
July 2017: Physiological Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28716150/swedish-norwegian-co-operation-in-the-treatment-of-three-hypothermia-victims-a-case-report
#19
Anders Wetting Carlsen, Nils K Skjaervold, Nils Johan Berg, Øystein Karlsen, Eli Gunnarson, Alexander Wahba
BACKGROUND: Accidental hypothermia with cardiac arrest represents a challenge for pre-hospital rescuers as well as in-hospital staff. For pre-hospital personnel, the main focus is to get the patient to the correct destination without unnecessary delay. For in-hospital personnel early information is vital to assess the possibility for resuscitation with extracorporeal re-warming. The challenge is augmented when rescuers must cross national borders to reach and/or deliver the patients. We present a case where three adolescent boys suffered severe hypothermia after a canoeing accident in Sweden...
July 17, 2017: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28715885/the-effects-of-exercise-and-cold-exposure-on-mitochondrial-biogenesis-in-skeletal-muscle-and-white-adipose-tissue
#20
Nana Chung, Jonghoon Park, Kiwon Lim
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise or/and cold exposure regulate mitochondria biogenesis-related gene expression in soleus and inguinal adipose tissue of mice. METHODS: Forty ICR 5-week old male mice were divided into four groups: thermoneutrality-untrained (23 ± 1 °C in room temperature, n=10), cold-water immersion (24 ± 1 °C, n=10), exercise in neutral temperature (34 ± 1 °C, n=10), and exercise in cold temperature (24 ± 1 °C, n=10)...
June 30, 2017: Journal of Exercise Nutrition & Biochemistry
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