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protein evolution

Clémence Granier, Emeline Vinatier, Elia Colin, Marion Mandavit, Charles Dariane, Virginie Verkarre, Lucie Biard, Rami El Zein, Corinne Lesaffre, Isabelle Galy-Fauroux, Hélène Roussel, Eléonore De Guillebon, Charlotte Blanc, Antonin Saldmann, Cécile Badoual, Alain Gey, Éric Tartour
Immune cells are important components of the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor growth and evolution at all stages of carcinogenesis. Notably, it is now well established that the immune infiltrate in human tumors can correlate with prognosis and response to therapy. The analysis of the immune infiltrate in the tumor microenvironment has become a major challenge for the classification of patients and the response to treatment. The co-expression of inhibitory receptors such as Program Cell Death Protein 1 (PD1; also known as CD279), Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Associated Protein 4 (CTLA-4), T-Cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin Containing Protein-3 (Tim-3; also known as CD366), and Lymphocyte Activation Gene 3 (Lag-3; also known as CD223), is a hallmark of T cell exhaustion...
February 8, 2018: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Brian G O'Flynn, Aidan J Hawley, David J Merkler
Crop protection against destructive pests has been at the forefront of recent agricultural advancements. Rapid adaptive evolution has led to insects becoming immune to the chemicals employed to quell their damage. Insecticide resistance is a serious problem that negatively impacts food production, food storage, human health, and the environment. To make matters more complicated are the strict regulations in place on insecticide development, driven by rising public concern relating to the harmful effects these chemicals have on the environment and on society...
2018: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Journal
Muhammad Abdullah, Yunpeng Cao, Xi Cheng, Awais Shakoor, Xueqiang Su, Junshan Gao, Yongping Cai
The SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein (SBP)-box proteins are plant-specific transcriptional factors in plants. SBP TFs are known to play important functions in a diverse development process and also related in the process of evolutionary novelties. SBP gene family has been characterized in several plant species, but little is known about molecular evolution, functional divergence and comprehensive study of SBP gene family in Rosacea. We carried out genome-wide investigations and identified 14, 32, 17, and 17 SBP genes from four Rosacea species ( Fragaria vesca , Pyrus bretschneideri, Prunus persica and Prunus mume , respectively)...
2018: Frontiers in Genetics
Andrej Steyer, Tilen Konte, Martin Sagadin, Marko Kolenc, Andrej Škoberne, Julija Germ, Tadeja Dovč-Drnovšek, Miha Arnol, Mateja Poljšak-Prijatelj
Noroviruses are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis, and they can affect humans of all age groups. In immunocompromised patients, norovirus infections can develop into chronic diarrhea or show prolonged asymptomatic virus shedding. Chronic norovirus infections are frequently reported for solid organ transplant recipients, with rapid intrahost norovirus evolution seen. In this report, we describe a case of chronic norovirus infection in an immunocompromised patient who was followed up for over 5 years...
2018: Frontiers in Microbiology
Yaron Caspi, Cees Dekker
Cell division in most prokaryotes is mediated by the well-studied fts genes, with FtsZ as the principal player. In many archaeal species, however, division is orchestrated differently. The Crenarchaeota phylum of archaea features the action of the three proteins, CdvABC. This Cdv system is a unique and less-well-studied division mechanism that merits closer inspection. In vivo , the three Cdv proteins form a composite band that contracts concomitantly with the septum formation. Of the three Cdv proteins, CdvA is the first to be recruited to the division site, while CdvB and CdvC are thought to participate in the active part of the Cdv division machinery...
2018: Frontiers in Microbiology
Anamika Patel, Peng Yang, Matthew Tinkham, Mihika Pradhan, Ming-An Sun, Yixuan Wang, Don Hoang, Gernot Wolf, John R Horton, Xing Zhang, Todd Macfarlan, Xiaodong Cheng
Tandem zinc finger (ZF) proteins are the largest and most rapidly diverging family of DNA-binding transcription regulators in mammals. ZFP568 represses a transcript of placental-specific insulin like growth factor 2 (Igf2-P0) in mice. ZFP568 binds a 24-base pair sequence-specific element upstream of Igf2-P0 via the eleven-ZF array. Both DNA and protein conformations deviate from the conventional one finger-three bases recognition, with individual ZFs contacting 2, 3, or 4 bases and recognizing thymine on the opposite strand...
March 13, 2018: Cell
Carl Peter J Maury
A crucial stage in the origin of life was the emergence of the first molecular entity that was able to replicate, transmit information, and evolve on the early Earth. The amyloid world hypothesis posits that in the pre-RNA era, information processing was based on catalytic amyloids. The self-assembly of short peptides into β-sheet amyloid conformers leads to extraordinary structural stability and novel multifunctionality that cannot be achieved by the corresponding nonaggregated peptides. The new functions include self-replication, catalytic activities, and information transfer...
March 17, 2018: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences: CMLS
Seaim Lwin Aye, Kei Fujiwara, Asuka Ueki, Nobuhide Doi
Although compartmentalized self-replication (CSR) and compartmentalized partnered replication (CPR) are powerful tools for directed evolution of proteins and gene circuits, limitations remain in the emulsion PCR process with the wild-type Taq DNA polymerase used so far, including long run times, low amounts of product, and false negative results due to inhibitors. In this study, we developed a high-efficiency mutant of DNA polymerase I from Thermus thermophilus HB27 (Tth pol) suited for CSR and CPR. We modified the wild-type Tth pol by (i) deletion of the N-terminal 5' to 3' exonuclease domain, (ii) fusion with the DNA-binding protein Sso7d, (iii) introduction of four known effective point mutations from other DNA polymerase mutants, and (iv) codon optimization to reduce the GC content...
March 14, 2018: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Kenichi Morigaki, Yasushi Tanimoto
One of the main questions in the membrane biology is the functional roles of membrane heterogeneity and molecular localization. Although segregation and local enrichment of protein/lipid components (rafts) have been extensively studied, the presence and functions of such membrane domains still remain elusive. Along with biochemical, cell observation, and simulation studies, model membranes are emerging as an important tool for understanding the biological membrane, providing quantitative information on the physicochemical properties of membrane proteins and lipids...
March 14, 2018: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Shintaro Yamada, Kazuto Kugou, Da-Qiao Ding, Yurika Fujita, Yasushi Hiraoka, Hiroshi Murakami, Kunihiro Ohta, Takatomi Yamada
Meiotic recombination ensures faithful chromosome segregation and confers genetic diversity to gametes, and thus, is a key DNA-templated reaction not only for sexual reproduction, but also evolution. This recombination is initiated by programmed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), which are mainly formed at recombination hotspots. As meiotic DSB formation requires multiple proteins, it is regulated by chromatin structure. In particular, DSB occurs in a higher-order chromatin architecture termed "axis-loop", in which many loops protrude from proteinaceous axis...
March 16, 2018: Current Genetics
Hoku West-Foyle, Priyanka Kothari, Jonathan Osborne, Douglas N Robinson
The 14-3-3 family comprises a group of small proteins that are essential, ubiquitous, and highly conserved across eukaryotes. Overexpression of the 14-3-3s sigma, epsilon, zeta, and eta correlates with high metastatic potential in multiple cancer types. In Dictyostelium , 14-3-3 promotes myosin II turnover in the cell cortex and modulates cortical tension, cell shape, and cytokinesis. In light of the important roles of 14-3-3 proteins across a broad range of eukaryotic species, we sought to determine how 14-3-3 proteins interact with myosin II...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Biological Chemistry
Sa Geng, Ayano Miyagi, James G Umen
Volvocine algae comprise a unique comparative model for investigating the evolution of distinct male and female sexes (oogamy) from an isogamous ancestral state with mating types. The mating-type or sex-determining gene MID encodes a putative RWP-RK family transcription factor, and orthologs of MID are present throughout the volvocine algal lineage in either the MT- or male mating locus of dioecious species. It was previously found that ectopic expression of isogamous Chlamydomonas reinhardtii MID ( CrMID ) in a C...
March 16, 2018: Development
Antoine Molaro, Janet M Young, Harmit S Malik
Eukaryotic genomes must accomplish both compact packaging for genome stability and inheritance, as well as accessibility for gene expression. They do so using post-translational modifications of four ancient canonical histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4) and by deploying histone variants with specialized chromatin functions. Some histone variants are conserved across all eukaryotes, whereas others are lineage-specific. Here, we performed detailed phylogenomic analyses of "short H2A histone" variants found in mammalian genomes...
March 16, 2018: Genome Research
Ying Jiang, Michela Schiavon, Leonardo W Lima, Tripti, Rachel R Jones, Ali F El Mehdawi, Suzanne Royer, Zhaohai Zeng, Yuegao Hu, Elizabeth A H Pilon-Smits, Marinus Pilon
BACKGROUND: The plant Stanleya pinnata hyperaccumulates Se up to 0.5% of its dry weight in organic forms, whereas the closely related Stanleya elata does not hyperaccumulate Se. ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) can catalyze the formation of adenosine 5'-phosphoselenate (APSe) from ATP and selenate. We investigated the S. pinnata ATPS2 isoform (SpATPS2) to assess its possible role in Se hyperaccumulation. METHODS: ATPS expression and activity was compared in the two Stanleya species...
March 13, 2018: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Teresa Morales-Ruiz, Álvaro C Romero-Valenzuela, Vanessa M Vázquez-Grande, Teresa Roldán-Arjona, Rafael R Ariza, Dolores Córdoba-Cañero
Base excision repair (BER) is a major defense pathway against spontaneous DNA damage. This multistep process is initiated by DNA glycosylases that recognise and excise the damaged base, and proceeds by the concerted action of additional proteins that perform incision of the abasic site, gap filling and ligation. BER has been extensively studied in bacteria, yeasts and animals. Although knowledge of this pathway in land plants is increasing, there are no reports detecting BER in algae. We describe here an experimental in vitro system allowing the specific analysis of BER in the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii...
March 5, 2018: DNA Repair
Xiangying Guan, Alok Upadhyay, Sudipto Munshi, Raj Chakrabarti
Across all families of enzymes, only a dozen or so distinct classes of non-natural small molecule activators have been characterized, with only four known modes of activation among them. All of these modes of activation rely on naturally evolved binding sites that trigger global conformational changes. Among the enzymes that are of greatest interest for small molecule activation are the seven sirtuin enzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent protein deacylases that play a central role in the regulation of healthspan and lifespan in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals...
2018: PloS One
Jane Hawkey, David B Ascher, Louise M Judd, Ryan R Wick, Xenia Kostoulias, Heather Cleland, Denis W Spelman, Alex Padiglione, Anton Y Peleg, Kathryn E Holt
Acinetobacter baumannii is a common causative agent of hospital-acquired infections and a leading cause of infection in burns patients. Carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii is considered a major public-health threat and has been identified by the World Health Organization as the top priority organism requiring new antimicrobials. The most common mechanism for carbapenem resistance in A. baumannii is via horizontal acquisition of carbapenemase genes. In this study, we sampled 20 A. baumannii isolates from a patient with extensive burns, and characterized the evolution of carbapenem resistance over a 45 day period via Illumina and Oxford Nanopore sequencing...
March 16, 2018: Microbial Genomics
Yu Shi, Wenguang Liu, Maoxian He
Bivalve mollusks exhibit hermaphroditism and sex reversal/differentiation. Studies generally focus on transcriptional profiling and specific genes related to sex determination and differentiation. Few studies on sex reversal/differentiation have been reported. A combination analysis of gonad proteomics and transcriptomics was conducted on Chlamys nobilis to provide a systematic understanding of sex reversal/differentiation in bivalves. We obtained 4258 unique peptides and 93,731 unigenes with good correlation between messenger RNA and protein levels...
March 15, 2018: Marine Biotechnology
Joshua A Kritzer, Yelena Freyzon, Susan Lindquist
Tyrosine phosphorylation is a key biochemical signal that controls growth and differentiation in multicellular organisms. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and nearly all other unicellular eukaryotes lack intact phosphotyrosine signaling pathways. However, many of these organisms have primitive phosphotyrosine-binding proteins and tyrosine phosphatases, leading to the assumption that the major barrier for emergence of phosphotyrosine signaling was the negative consequences of promiscuous tyrosine kinase activity. In this work, we reveal that the classic oncogene v-Src, which phosphorylates many dozens of proteins in yeast, is toxic because it disrupts a specific spore wall remodeling pathway...
March 13, 2018: FEMS Yeast Research
Peter L Cummins, Babu Kannappan, Jill E Gready
The ubiquitous enzyme Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (RuBisCO) fixes atmospheric carbon dioxide within the Calvin-Benson cycle that is utilized by most photosynthetic organisms. Despite this central role, RuBisCO's efficiency surprisingly struggles, with both a very slow turnover rate to products and also impaired substrate specificity, features that have long been an enigma as it would be assumed that its efficiency was under strong evolutionary pressure. RuBisCO's substrate specificity is compromised as it catalyzes a side-fixation reaction with atmospheric oxygen; empirical kinetic results show a trend to tradeoff between relative specificity and low catalytic turnover rate...
2018: Frontiers in Plant Science
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