Read by QxMD icon Read


Shereen M Hamza, John E Hall
Renal sympathetic nerves contribute significantly to both physiological and pathophysiological phenomena. Evaluating renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) is of great interest in many areas of research such as chronic kidney disease, hypertension, heart failure, diabetes and obesity. Unequivocal assessment of the role of the sympathetic nervous system is thus imperative for proper interpretation of experimental results and understanding of disease processes. RSNA has been traditionally measured in anesthetized rodents, including mice...
February 14, 2018: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Takuma Iguchi, Noriyo Niino, Satoshi Tamai, Ken Sakurai, Kazuhiko Mori
RT-qPCR is one of the most common methods to assess individual target miRNAs. MiRNAs levels are generally measured relative to a reference sample. This approach is appropriate for examining physiological changes in target gene expression levels. However, absolute quantification using better statistical analysis is preferable for a comprehensive assessment of gene expression levels. Absolute quantification is still not in common use. This report describes a protocol for measuring the absolute levels of plasma miRNA, using RT-qPCR with or without pre-amplification...
February 12, 2018: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Jennifer F Buckman, Evgeny G Vaschillo, Maria Fonoberova, Igor Mezić, Marsha E Bates
OBJECTIVE: It has been nearly 15 years since Kazdin and Nock published methodological and research recommendations for understanding mechanisms of change in child and adolescent therapy. Their arguments and enthusiasm for research on mechanisms of behavior change (MOBCs) resonated across disciplines and disorders, as it shined a light on the crucial importance of understanding how and for whom treatments instigate behavior change and how therapeutic mechanisms might be extended to "situations and settings of everyday life...
March 2018: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Temitayo Oyefunmike Oyegbile, Bronson Elizabeth Delasobera, Nassim Zecavati
The objective was to characterize cognitive deficits and postconcussive symptoms in a pediatric population with no concussion, a single concussion, and ≥2 concussions, using a cross-sectional design. Cognitive function and postconcussive symptoms were assessed in participants (age 10-20) with no concussion (n = 1118), single concussion (n = 368), and repeated (≥2) concussions (n = 252). Analyses were adjusted for age and gender. Individuals with ≥2 concussions exhibited more total postconcussive symptoms; more loss of consciousness, amnesia and confusion; more headaches; and poorer cognitive function compared to no concussion and single concussion...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Child Neurology
Ákos Lehotsky, András Falus, Ágnes Lukács, Andrea Rita Füzi, Edina Gradvohl, Sarolta Mészárosné Darvay, Ilona Bihariné Krekó, Kata Berta, Alexandra Deák, Helga Judit Feith
INTRODUCTION AND AIM: In the case of primary school children in Budapest (n = 165), data on their social status and their previous knowledge on hand hygiene were elicited with the help of pre-knowledge questionnaires issued by students of higher education. The aim of the research was introducing a novel pedagogical procedure - application and optimization of peer education in the development of proper hand hygiene among primary school students. METHOD: The knowledge-based survey was conducted after four (n = 85) and eight hours of teaching (n = 36)...
March 2018: Orvosi Hetilap
Bing Wu, Yi Yang, Shuai Zhou, Wei Wang, Zizhen Wang, Gang Hu, Jianghong He, Xinhuai Wu
Purpose: Diagnostic error is common among patients with vegetative state (VS) and minimally conscious state (MCS). The purpose of this article is to use three-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pcASL) to compare cerebral blood flow (CBF) patterns in patients in MCS with those in VS. Methods: Patients meeting MCS and VS criteria were identified. Two post-labeling delay (PLD) time pcASL on 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner system were performed with patients in the resting awake state...
2018: Frontiers in Neurology
Marjan Persuh, Eric LaRock, Jacob Berger
Working memory (WM), an important posit in cognitive science, allows one to temporarily store and manipulate information in the service of ongoing tasks. WM has been traditionally classified as an explicit memory system-that is, as operating on and maintaining only consciously perceived information. Recently, however, several studies have questioned this assumption, purporting to provide evidence for unconscious WM. In this article, we focus on visual working memory (VWM) and critically examine these studies as well as studies of unconscious perception that seem to provide indirect evidence for unconscious WM...
2018: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Qindong Sun, Nan Wang, Shancang Li, Hongyi Zhou
Recently, the online social networks (OSNs) have received considerable attentions as a revolutionary platform to offer users massive social interaction among users that enables users to be more involved in their own healthcare. The OSNs have also promoted increasing interests in the generation of analytical, data models in health informatics. This paper aims at developing an obesity identification, analysis, and estimation model, in which each individual user is regarded as an online social network 'sensor' that can provide valuable health information...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Biomedical Informatics
Jackson Emanuel, Andrea Marzi, Heinz Feldmann
The Filoviridae are a family of negative-strand RNA viruses that include several important human pathogens. Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus are well-known filoviruses which cause life-threatening viral hemorrhagic fever in human and nonhuman primates. In addition to severe pathogenesis, filoviruses also exhibit a propensity for human-to-human transmission by close contact, posing challenges to containment and crisis management. Past outbreaks, in particular the recent West African EBOV epidemic, have been responsible for thousands of deaths and vaulted the filoviruses into public consciousness...
2018: Advances in Virus Research
Amrita Aranake-Chrisinger, Jenny Zhao Cheng, Maxwell R Muench, Rose Tang, Angela Mickle, Hannah Maybrier, Nan Lin, Troy Wildes, Eric Lenze, Michael Simon Avidan
INTRODUCTION: Postoperative delirium (POD) is a common complication in elderly patients, characterised by a fluctuating course of altered consciousness, disordered thinking and inattention. Preliminary research has linked POD with persistent cognitive impairment and decreased quality of life. However, these findings maybe confounded by patient comorbidities, postoperative complications and frailty. Our objective is to determine whether POD is an independent risk factor for persistent impairments in attention and executive function after elective surgery...
March 17, 2018: BMJ Open
Pete Buth, Benoit de Gryse, Sean Healy, Vincent Hoedt, Tara Newell, Giovanni Pintaldi, Hernan Del Valle, Julian C Sheather, Sidney Wong
Humanitarian organisations often work alongside those responsible for serious wrongdoing. In these circumstances, accusations of moral complicity are sometimes levelled at decision makers. These accusations can carry a strong if unfocused moral charge and are frequently the source of significant moral unease. In this paper, we explore the meaning and usefulness of complicity and its relation to moral accountability. We also examine the impact of concerns about complicity on the motivation of humanitarian staff and the risk that complicity may lead to a retreat into moral narcissism...
March 17, 2018: Journal of Medical Ethics
Lauri Nummenmaa, Juha M Lahnakoski, Enrico Glerean
Sociability and capability of shared mental states are hallmarks of the human species, and pursuing shared goals oftentimes requires coordinating both behaviour and mental states. Here we review recent work using indices of intersubject neural synchronisation for measuring similarity of mental states across individuals. We discuss the methodological advances and limitations in the analyses based on intersubject synchrony, and discuss how these kinds of model-free analysis techniques enable the investigation of the brain basis of complex social processes...
March 8, 2018: Current Opinion in Psychology
Peter A White
This paper reviews proposals that conscious perception consists, in whole or part, of successive discrete temporal frames on the sub-second time scale, each frame containing information registered as simultaneous or static. Although the idea of discrete frames in conscious perception cannot be regarded as falsified, there are many problems. Evidence does not consistently support any proposed duration or range of durations for frames. EEG waveforms provide evidence of periodicity in brain activity, but not necessarily in conscious perception...
March 14, 2018: Consciousness and Cognition
Ping-Hsien Yang, Shyh-Dar Shyur, Ming-Jer Liu, Hsin-Hui Chuang
Buckwheat anaphylaxis is commonly recognized in Europe and Asia, and there is only one case reported in Taiwan so far. Here, we report a case of biphasic buckwheat anaphylaxis in a 57 year-old male patient who lost consciousness twice in the same day after having buckwheat noodles. The serum test shows that Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp)immunoglobulin E (IgE) (42.4 kU/L) and buckwheat-specific IgE (81.5 kU/L) are unusually high. Although biphasic buckwheat anaphylaxis is rare, we should still be aware the second episode could be life-threatening and happen within a day after the exposure to the buckwheat antigen...
March 12, 2018: Asian Pacific Journal of Allergy and Immunology
Sharon Shmuely, Prisca R Bauer, Erik W van Zwet, J Gert van Dijk, Roland D Thijs
OBJECTIVE: We assessed motor phenomena in syncope and convulsive seizures to aid differential diagnosis and understand the pathophysiologic correlates. METHODS: We studied video-EEG recordings of tilt-induced syncope and convulsive seizures in participants aged 15 years and older. Syncope was defined as (1) loss of consciousness (video-assessed), (2) circulatory changes (accelerating blood pressure decrease with or without bradycardia/asystole), and (3) EEG changes ("slow" or "slow-flat-slow")...
March 16, 2018: Neurology
Jennifer Smith, Xin Zheng, Kevin Lafreniere, Ian Pike
BACKGROUND: Social marketing is a tool used in the domain of public health for prevention and public education. Because injury prevention is a priority public health issue in British Columbia, Canada, a 3-year consultation was undertaken to understand public attitudes towards preventable injuries and mount a province-wide social marketing campaign aimed at adults aged 25-55 years. METHODS: Public response to the campaign was assessed through an online survey administered to a regionally representative sample of adults within the target age group between 1 and 4 times per year on an ongoing basis since campaign launch...
March 16, 2018: Injury Prevention: Journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention
Augusto Caraceni, Raffaella Speranza, Elio Spoldi, Cristina Sonia Ambroset, Stefano Canestrari, Mauro Marinari, Anna Maria Marzi, Luciano Orsi, Laura Piva, Mirta Rocchi, Danila Valenti, Gianluigi Zeppetella, Furio Zucco, Alessandra Raimondi, Leonor Vasconcelos Matos, Cinzia Brunelli
CONTEXT: Few studies regarding palliative sedation (PS) have been carried out in home care (HC) setting. A comparison of PS rate and practices between hospice (HS) and HC is also lacking. OBJECTIVES: Comparing HC and HS settings for PS rate, patient clinical characteristics before and during PS, decision-making process and clinical aspects of PS. METHODS: 38 HC/HS services in Italy participated in a multicenter observational longitudinal study...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Robin L Carhart-Harris
The entropic brain hypothesis proposes that within upper and lower limits, after which consciousness may be lost, the entropy of spontaneous brain activity indexes the informational richness of conscious states. Here the hypothesis is revisited four years on from its original publication. It is shown that the principle that the entropy of brain activity is elevated in the psychedelic state is increasingly well supported by separate and independent studies and analyses, and evidence for greater brain criticality under psychedelics is also highlighted...
March 13, 2018: Neuropharmacology
Jinha Park, B Kahng
The Kuramoto model with mixed signs of couplings is known to produce a traveling-wave synchronized state. Here, we consider an abrupt synchronization transition from the incoherent state to the traveling-wave state through a long-lasting metastable state with large fluctuations. Our explanation of the metastability is that the dynamic flow remains within a limited region of phase space and circulates through a few active states bounded by saddle and stable fixed points. This complex flow generates a long-lasting critical behavior, a signature of a hybrid phase transition...
February 2018: Physical Review. E
Byron J Schneider, Zachary McCormick, David O'Brien, Michael Bunch, Clark C Smith
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 14, 2018: Pain Medicine: the Official Journal of the American Academy of Pain Medicine
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"