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neural homeostasis

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28935704/the-splicing-co-factor-barricade-tat-sf1-is-required-for-cell-cycle-and-lineage-progression-in-drosophila-neural-stem-cells
#1
Monika K Abramczuk, Thomas R Burkard, Vivien Rolland, Victoria Steinmann, Peter Duchek, Yanrui Jiang, Sebastian Wissel, Heinrich Reichert, Juergen A Knoblich
Stem cells need to balance self-renewal and differentiation for correct tissue development and homeostasis. Defects in this balance can lead to developmental defects or tumor formation. In recent years, mRNA splicing has emerged as one important mechanism regulating cell fate decisions. Here we address the role of the evolutionary conserved splicing co-factor Barricade (Barc)/Tat-SF1/CUS2 in Drosophila neural stem cell (neuroblast) lineage formation. We show that Barc is required for the generation of neurons during Drosophila brain development by ensuring correct neural progenitor proliferation and differentiation...
September 21, 2017: Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28932245/electromagnetic-fields-for-the-regulation-of-neural-stem-cells
#2
REVIEW
Mengchu Cui, Hongfei Ge, Hengli Zhao, Yongjie Zou, Yujie Chen, Hua Feng
Localized magnetic fields (MFs) could easily penetrate the scalp, skull, and meninges, thus inducing an electrical current in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, which is primarily used in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for inducing specific effects on different regions or cells that play roles in various brain activities. Studies of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have led to novel attractive therapeutic approaches. Neural stem cells (NSCs) in adult human brain are able to self-renew and possess multidifferential ability to maintain homeostasis and repair damage after acute central nervous system...
2017: Stem Cells International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28932187/linking-network-activity-to-synaptic-plasticity-during-sleep-hypotheses-and-recent-data
#3
REVIEW
Carlos Puentes-Mestril, Sara J Aton
Research findings over the past two decades have supported a link between sleep states and synaptic plasticity. Numerous mechanistic hypotheses have been put forth to explain this relationship. For example, multiple studies have shown structural alterations to synapses (including changes in synaptic volume, spine density, and receptor composition) indicative of synaptic weakening after a period of sleep. Direct measures of neuronal activity and synaptic strength support the idea that a period of sleep can reduce synaptic strength...
2017: Frontiers in Neural Circuits
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923480/impact-of-morphine-on-the-expression-of-insulin-receptor-and-protein-levels-of-insulin-igfs-in-rat-neural-stem-cells
#4
Sadegh Salarinasab, AliReza Nourazarian, Masoud Nikanfar, Nima Abdyazdani, Masoumeh Kazemi, Navid Feizy, Reza Rahbarghazi
Alzheimer's disease is correlated with neuronal degeneration and loss of neuronal precursors in different parts of the brain. It has been found disturbance in the homeostasis neural stem cells (NSCs) can cause neurodegeneration. Morphine, an analgesic agent, can disrupt the dynamic and normal state of NSCs. However, more investigations are required to clearly address underlying mechanisms. The current experiment aimed to investigate the effects of morphine on the cell distribution of insulin factor and receptor and insulin-like growth factors (IGF1, IGF2) in NSCs...
September 15, 2017: Neuroscience Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916442/acute-stress-promotes-post-injury-brain-regeneration-in-fish
#5
Michael S Sinyakov, Amihai Haimovich, Ramy R Avtalion
The central nervous system and the immune system, the two major players in homeostasis, operate in the ongoing bidirectional interaction. Stress is the third player that exerts strong effect on these two 'supersystems'; yet, its impact is studied much less. In this work employing carp model, we studied the influence of preliminary stress on neural and immune networks involved in post-injury brain regeneration. The relevant in-vivo models of air-exposure stress and precisely directed cerebellum injury have been developed...
September 12, 2017: Brain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28915355/thiamin-deficiency-on-fetal-brain-development-with-and-without-prenatal-alcohol-exposure
#6
Olena Kloss, Michael Eskin, Miyoung Suh
Adequate thiamin levels are crucial for optimal health, through maintenance of homeostasis and viability of metabolic enzymes, which require thiamine as a co-factor. Thiamin deficiency occurs during pregnancy when dietary intake is inadequate or excessive alcohol is consumed. Thiamin deficiency leads to brain dysfunction due to its involvement in synthesis of myelin and neurotransmitters (eg. acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate), and increases oxidative stress by decreasing the production of reducing agents...
September 15, 2017: Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Biochimie et Biologie Cellulaire
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28912251/neuro-immune-interaction-and-the-regulation-of-intestinal-immune-homeostasis
#7
Simon Verheijden, Guy E Boeckxstaens
Many essential gastrointestinal functions, including motility, secretion and blood flow are regulated by the autonomic nervous system (ANS), both through intrinsic enteric neurons and extrinsic (sympathetic and parasympathetic) innervation. Recently identified neuro-immune mechanisms, in particular the interplay between enteric neurons and muscularis macrophages, are now considered to be essential for fine-tuning peristalsis. These findings shed new light on how intestinal immune cells can support enteric nervous function...
September 14, 2017: American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28902444/genomewide-association-studies-of-suicide-attempts-in-us-soldiers
#8
Murray B Stein, Erin B Ware, Colter Mitchell, Chia-Yen Chen, Susan Borja, Tianxi Cai, Catherine L Dempsey, Carol S Fullerton, Joel Gelernter, Steven G Heeringa, Sonia Jain, Ronald C Kessler, James A Naifeh, Matthew K Nock, Stephan Ripke, Xiaoying Sun, Jean C Beckham, Nathan A Kimbrel, Robert J Ursano, Jordan W Smoller
Suicide is a global public health problem with particular resonance for the US military. Genetic risk factors for suicidality are of interest as indicators of susceptibility and potential targets for intervention. We utilized population-based nonclinical cohorts of US military personnel (discovery: N = 473 cases and N = 9778 control subjects; replication: N = 135 cases and N = 6879 control subjects) and a clinical case-control sample of recent suicide attempters (N = 51 cases and N = 112 control subjects) to conduct GWAS of suicide attempts (SA)...
September 13, 2017: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28900932/neurological-and-motor-disorders-neuronal-store-operated-ca-2-signaling-an-overview-and-its-function
#9
Sunitha Bollimuntha, Biswaranjan Pani, Brij B Singh
Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a ubiquitous second messenger that performs significant physiological task such as neurosecretion, exocytosis, neuronal growth/differentiation, and the development and/or maintenance of neural circuits. An important regulatory aspect of neuronal Ca(2+) homeostasis is store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) which, in recent years, has gained much attention for influencing a variety of nerve cell responses. Essentially, activation of SOCE ensues following the activation of the plasma membrane (PM) store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCC) triggered by the depletion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores...
2017: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28899812/the-starving-brain-overfed-meets-undernourished-in-the-pathology-of-mild-cognitive-impairment-mci-and-alzheimer-s-disease-ad
#10
REVIEW
Kelly J Gibas
Type II Diabetes affects 400 million people worldwide (IDF, 2013). The pathology is paradoxical: internal starvation activated by overfeeding. Hyperinsulinemic impairments of glucose homeostasis are treated with anti-hyperglycemics exacerbating cell starvation, inducing hypoglycemia and raising respiratory quotient. Reductions in hyperglycemia are achieved at the expense of glucose dependency and metabolic inflexibility (Gibas & Gibas, 2017). The brain is not immune from these cycles of starvation. The bioenergetic model characterizes propagation of late-onset, sporadic Alzheimer's disease as loss of molecular fidelity and compromised energy originating in brain networks with highest metabolic demand...
September 9, 2017: Neurochemistry International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28898976/regulation-of-immune-and-neural-function-via-leukocyte-ig-like-receptors
#11
Kazuya Takeda, Akira Nakamura
Leukocyte Ig-like receptors (LILRs)/Ig-like transcripts (ILTs) are expressed on innate and adaptive immune cells and maintain immune homeostasis. LILRs consist of activating and inhibitory-type receptors that regulate adequate cellular functions. LILRs were firstly identified as MHC class I receptors, therefore expression and/or polymorphisms of LILRs are reported to associate with autoimmune disorders and transplant rejection; however, recent accumulating evidences have revealed that LILRs recognize with diverse ligands including bacteria and virus...
August 1, 2017: Journal of Biochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28882554/the-impact-of-androgen-actions-in-neurons-on-metabolic-health-and-disease
#12
REVIEW
Jamie J Morford, Sheng Wu, Franck Mauvais-Jarvis
The male hormone testosterone exerts different effects on glucose and energy homeostasis in males and females. Testosterone deficiency predisposes males to visceral obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, testosterone excess predisposes females to similar metabolic dysfunction. Here, we review the effects of testosterone actions in the central nervous system on metabolic function in males and females. In particular, we highlight changes within the hypothalamus that control glucose and energy homeostasis...
September 4, 2017: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28879461/perinatal-exposure-to-the-cyanotoxin-%C3%AE-n-m%C3%A3-thylamino-l-alanine-bmaa-results-in-long-lasting-behavioral-changes-in-offspring-potential-involvement-of-dna-damage-and-oxidative-stress
#13
Anthony Laugeray, Asma Oummadi, Clément Jourdain, Justyne Feat, Géraldine Meyer-Dilhet, Arnaud Menuet, Karen Plé, Marion Gay, Sylvain Routier, Stéphane Mortaud, Gilles J Guillemin
We recently demonstrated that perinatal exposure to the glutamate-related herbicide, glufosinate ammonium, has deleterious effects on neural stem cell (NSC) homeostasis within the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ), probably leading to ASD-like symptoms in offspring later in life. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether perinatal exposure to another glutamate-related toxicant, the cyanobacterial amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), might also trigger neurodevelopmental disturbances. With this aim, female mice were intranasally exposed to low doses of BMAA, 50 mg kg(-1) three times a week from embryonic days 7-10 to postnatal day 21...
September 6, 2017: Neurotoxicity Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28873382/development-and-anatomy-of-the-enteroendocrine-system-in-humans
#14
Carsten Posovszky
The gastrointestinal (GI) tract exhibits an enormous surface area that consists mostly of absorptive enterocytes. Enteroendocrine cells (EECs) are found scattered along the GI tract between absorptive enterocytes and other secretory cells, and comprise around 1% of the epithelial cell population. Interestingly, they develop from the same crypt stem cell as the other absorptive or secretory cells of the gut. EECs differentiate along the crypt villus axis and are renewed every 4-6 days, and hence possess a high plasticity...
2017: Endocrine Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28869249/glp-1-and-the-kidney-from-physiology-to-pharmacology-and-outcomes-in-diabetes
#15
REVIEW
Marcel H A Muskiet, Lennart Tonneijck, Mark M Smits, Michaël J B van Baar, Mark H H Kramer, Ewout J Hoorn, Jaap A Joles, Daniël H van Raalte
The gastrointestinal tract - the largest endocrine network in human physiology - orchestrates signals from the external environment to maintain neural and hormonal control of homeostasis. Advances in understanding entero-endocrine cell biology in health and disease have important translational relevance. The gut-derived incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is secreted upon meal ingestion and controls glucose metabolism by modulating pancreatic islet cell function, food intake and gastrointestinal motility, amongst other effects...
October 2017: Nature Reviews. Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28869034/plasticity-and-function-of-human-skeletal-muscle-in-relation-to-disuse-and-rehabilitation-influence-of-ageing-and-surgery
#16
Charlotte Suetta
In order to study the influence of disuse and aging on skeletal muscle homeostasis, different human models were employed. Effects of chronic disuse were investigated in elderly patients suffering from uni-lateral hip-osteoarthritis, whereas the effect of short-term disuse (4 and 14 days of unilateral lower limb immobilisation) was assessed in healthy young and old individuals. In summary, chronic muscle disuse in the elderly was associated with marked quantitative as well as qualitative neuromuscular impairments...
August 2017: Danish Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28840555/can-astrocytes-be-a-target-for-precision-medicine
#17
Chloe F Allen, Pamela J Shaw, Laura Ferraiuolo
Astrocytes are the most abundant non-neural cell type residing within the central nervous system (CNS) displaying tremendous heterogeneity depending on their location. Once believed to be 'passive support cells for electrically active neurons', astrocytes are now recognised to play an active role in brain homeostasis by forming connections with the surrounding neurons, microglia and endothelial cells. Most importantly, they provide an optimum microenvironment for functional neurons through regulation of the blood brain barrier, energy supply and removal of debris and toxic waste...
2017: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28840469/early-exposure-to-ketamine-impairs-axonal-pruning-in-developing-mouse-hippocampus
#18
Aleksandar Lj Obradovic, Navya Atluri, Lorenza Dalla Massara, Azra Oklopcic, Nikola S Todorovic, Gaurav Katta, Hari P Osuru, Vesna Jevtovic-Todorovic
Mounting evidence suggests that prolonged exposure to general anesthesia (GA) during brain synaptogenesis damages the immature neurons and results in long-term neurocognitive impairments. Importantly, synaptogenesis relies on timely axon pruning to select axons that participate in active neural circuit formation. This process is in part dependent on proper homeostasis of neurotrophic factors, in particular brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We set out to examine how GA may modulate axon maintenance and pruning and focused on the role of BDNF...
August 24, 2017: Molecular Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28837556/from-homeostasis-to-behavior-balanced-activity-in-an-exploration-of-embodied-dynamic-environmental-neural-interaction
#19
Peter John Hellyer, Claudia Clopath, Angie A Kehagia, Federico E Turkheimer, Robert Leech
In recent years, there have been many computational simulations of spontaneous neural dynamics. Here, we describe a simple model of spontaneous neural dynamics that controls an agent moving in a simple virtual environment. These dynamics generate interesting brain-environment feedback interactions that rapidly destabilize neural and behavioral dynamics demonstrating the need for homeostatic mechanisms. We investigate roles for homeostatic plasticity both locally (local inhibition adjusting to balance excitatory input) as well as more globally (regional "task negative" activity that compensates for "task positive", sensory input in another region) balancing neural activity and leading to more stable behavior (trajectories through the environment)...
August 2017: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28835755/intestinal-stem-cell-niche-the-extracellular-matrix-and-cellular-components
#20
REVIEW
Laween Meran, Anna Baulies, Vivian S W Li
The intestinal epithelium comprises a monolayer of polarised columnar cells organised along the crypt-villus axis. Intestinal stem cells reside at the base of crypts and are constantly nourished by their surrounding niche for maintenance, self-renewal, and differentiation. The cellular microenvironment including the adjacent Paneth cells, stromal cells, smooth muscle cells, and neural cells as well as the extracellular matrix together constitute the intestinal stem cell niche. A dynamic regulatory network exists among the epithelium, stromal cells, and the matrix via complex signal transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis...
2017: Stem Cells International
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