Read by QxMD icon Read

esophageal trauma

Benjamin Nicholson, Harinder Dhindsa, Louis Seay
BACKGROUND: Blunt injuries to the cervical trachea remain rare but present unique and challenging clinical scenarios for prehospital providers. These injuries depend on prehospital providers either definitively securing the injured airway or bridging the patient to a treatment facility that can mobilize the necessary resources. CASE SUMMARY: The case presented here involves a clothesline injury to a pediatric patient that resulted in complete tracheal transection and partial esophageal transection...
October 4, 2016: Prehospital Emergency Care
Lijie Tan, Han Tang
Esophageal cancer is one of the most common digestive tract cancers in our country. Although multimodality therapy has been used in the treatment of esophageal cancer, such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and targeted therapy, surgery plays its irreplaceable role. With the development of techniques and innovation of instruments, minimally invasive esophagectomy is introduced into practice worldwide. Due to its less trauma and fewer complications, minimally invasive esophagectomy draws great attention, however, controversy exists in the question whether minimally invasive esophagectomy has similar efficacy to open esophagectomy...
September 25, 2016: Zhonghua Wei Chang Wai Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
George Manchi, Mathias M Brunnberg, Muhammad Shahid, Ahmad Al Aiyan, Leo Brunnberg, Silke Stein
An 8-year-old male Jack Russell crossbreed dog was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea and shock following a dog-bite injury on the ventral neck. Radiographs revealed subcutaneous emphysema and bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures. Intraoperatively, rupture of both sternohyoid muscles, both hyoepiglotticus muscles, both thyrohyoid muscles, and a partial cranial rupture of the superficial sphincter colli muscle were detected. Part of the epiglottis was detached from the thyroid cartilage. The patient's severed muscles and torn epiglottis were reattached using a simple interrupted suture pattern...
2016: Frontiers in Veterinary Science
Yuko Ono, Takuya Sugiyama, Yasuyuki Chida, Tetsuya Sato, Hiroaki Kikuchi, Daiji Suzuki, Masakazu Ikeda, Koichi Tanigawa, Kazuaki Shinohara
BACKGROUND: A reduction in medical staff such as occurs in hospitals during nights and weekends (off hours) is associated with a worse outcome in patients with several unanticipated critical conditions. Although difficult airway management (DAM) requires the simultaneous assistance of several appropriately trained medical caregivers, data are scarce regarding the association between off-hour presentation and endotracheal intubation (ETI)-related adverse events, especially in the trauma population...
2016: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
Christopher P Michetti, Heather A Prentice, Jennifer Rodriguez, Anna Newcomb
BACKGROUND: We studied trauma-specific conditions precluding semiupright positioning and other nonmodifiable risk factors for their influence on ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). METHODS: We performed a retrospective study at a Level I trauma center from 2008 to 2012 on ICU patients aged ≥15, who were intubated for more than 2 days. Using backward logistic regression, a composite of 4 factors (open abdomen, acute spinal cord injury, spine fracture, spine surgery) that preclude semiupright positioning (supine composite) and other variables were analyzed...
July 28, 2016: American Journal of Surgery
Marco E Allaix, Jason M Long, Marco G Patti
The last 25 years have witnessed a steady increase in the use of minimally invasive esophagectomy for the treatment of esophageal cancer. However, it is unclear which the optimal minimally invasive approach is: totally minimally invasive or hybrid (laparoscopic assisted or thoracoscopic assisted)? The current evidence from nonrandomized control trials suggests that hybrid laparoscopic-assisted esophagectomy couples the benefits of laparoscopy and the advantages of thoracotomy, leading to reduced surgical trauma without jeopardizing survival compared with open esophagectomy...
October 2016: Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques. Part A
Jana Sperka, Sheila J Hanson, Raymond G Hoffmann, Mahua Dasgupta, Michael T Meyer
OBJECTIVE: Recent Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) guidelines have deemphasized the use of advanced airways in short transport. It is unclear if guideline recommendations have altered practice. We sought to determine if a temporal change exists in the number of prehospital pediatric trauma intubations since the 2005 PALS guidelines update. METHODS: This is an institutional review board-approved, retrospective, single-center study. Reviewed all pediatric trauma activations where patients younger than 19 years were intubated at the scene, en route or at the level 1 trauma center during 2006 to 2011...
August 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Edward J Richer, Ramon Sanchez
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is an infrequent condition in pediatric patients. Presenting symptoms include chest pain, dysphagia, or vomiting, without initiating event. Patients may undergo esophagram because of concern for esophageal perforation as the source for pneumomediastinum, however, abnormalities are rarely demonstrated. The objective of this study is to identify whether esophagrams performed on pediatric patients for spontaneous pneumomediastinum are warranted...
June 6, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Surgery
Kenneth N Hiller, Carin A Hagberg
Initial management of ingested esophageal foreign bodies involves airway assessment, determination of the requirement for and timing of therapeutic intervention, risk mitigation during removal, and identification of all indicated equipment for retrieval. Long, sharp-pointed objects lodged in the esophagus require emergent attention and should be retrieved endoscopically, if perforation has not occurred. Inducing general anesthesia and rapidly securing the airway can minimize the risk of aspiration, mitigate any effects of tracheal compression, avoid the potential of exacerbating existing trauma, and provide optimal conditions for removal of long, sharp-pointed esophageal foreign bodies...
August 2016: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia
Gesa Wiegand, Christian Schlensak, Michael Hofbeck
The AMPLATZER(TM) Vascular Plug 4 (AVP4) is a self-expandable, replaceable occluder made of Nitinol wire mesh, which allows the safe and effective interventional occlusion of medium size vessels. This report describes an infant diagnosed with pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect, and multifocal collateral lung perfusion through four major aortopulmonary collateral arteries (MAPCAs). A central aorto-pulmonary shunt was performed at 4 months of age. Because of postoperative pulmonary hyperperfusion, one of the MAPCAs was closed interventionally using a 5 mm AVP4...
June 3, 2016: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
Gail T Tominaga, Kristan L Staudenmayer, Shahid Shafi, Kevin M Schuster, Stephanie A Savage, Steven Ross, Peter Muskat, Nathan T Mowery, Preston Miller, Kenji Inaba, Mitchell Jay Cohen, David Ciesla, Carlos V R Brown, Suresh Agarwal, Michel B Aboutanos, Garth H Utter, Marie Crandall
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Kyle R Taylor, Nicholas A Milone, Carlos E Rodriguez
The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is widely acclaimed to be cancer-resistant and of considerable research interest based on a paucity of reports of neoplasia in this species. We have, however, encountered four spontaneous cases of neoplasia and one presumptive case of neoplasia through routine necropsy and biopsy of individuals in a zoo collection of nonhybrid naked mole-rats bred from a single pair. One case each of metastasizing hepatocellular carcinoma, nephroblastoma (Wilms' tumor), and multicentric lymphosarcoma, as well as presumptive esophageal adenocarcinoma (Barrett's esophagus-like) was identified postmortem among 37 nonautolyzed necropsy submissions of naked mole-rats over 1-year-old that were submitted for necropsy between 1998 and August 2015...
April 29, 2016: Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Jennifer M Herring
BACKGROUND: Early enteral nutrition in dogs and cats can have significant benefit in the therapeutic management of critical illness. Blind placement of nasogastric or nasoesophageal feeding tubes to accomplish this goal has become standard practice. However, complications from tube misdirection into the tracheobronchial tree can lead to significant patient morbidity and mortality. Safe and consistent alternatives are desirable to minimize these risks. KEY CONCEPTS: A modified method for placement of nasoenteric tubes is described...
July 2016: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Shruti Patel, Ghulamullah Shahzad, Mahreema Jawairia, Krishnaiyer Subramani, Prakash Viswanathan, Paul Mustacchia
Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration...
2016: Case Reports in Medicine
Juan A Asensio, Patrizio Petrone, Oluwaseye Ayoola Ogun, Alejandro J Perez-Alonso, Michel Wagner, Robert Bertellotti, Bradley J Phillips, Anthony O Udekwu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
André Beer-Furlan, Roger S Brock, Lucas S Mendes, Eduardo G Mutarelli
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2, 2016: Acta Neurologica Belgica
Tatsuro Sassa, Ken-Ichiro Kobayashi, Masayuki Ota, Takuya Washino, Mayu Hikone, Naoya Sakamoto, Sentaro Iwabuchi, Mizuto Otsuji, Kenji Ohnishi
Most mediastinal abscesses result from infections after thoracotomy, esophageal perforation or pene- trating chest trauma. This disease is rarely caused by closed blunt chest trauma. All previously reported such cases after closed blunt chest trauma presented with hematoma and sternal osteomyelitis resulting from sternal fracture. Here we report a 15-year-old sumo wrestler who presented with an anterior mediastinal abscess without any mediastinal fracture. The mediastinal abscess resulted from the hematogenous spread of Staphylococcus aureus to a hematoma that might have been caused by a closed blunt chest trauma incurred during sumo wrestling exercises...
2015: Chinese Journal of Traumatology, Zhonghua Chuang Shang za Zhi
R Vecchio, E Intagliata, F Basile, C Spataro, G Giulia, V Leanza, S Marchese
Pneumomediastinum usually occurs after esophageal or chest trauma. Subcutaneous cervical emphysema as a presentation of non-traumatic colonic perforation following colorectal cancer or diverticulitis, is very rare. We report a case of a patient with rectal cancer who developed a diastatic cecum retroperitoneal perforation with a secondary pneumomediastinum and cervical emphysema. The patient was in treatment with a neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy for a low rectal cancer. Treatment consisted in an emergency right hemi-colectomy with ileostomy and performance of distal colonic fistula...
November 2015: Il Giornale di Chirurgia
Carlo Liguori, Nicola Gagliardi, Pietro Paolo Saturnino, Antonio Pinto, Luigia Romano
Perforation of the esophagus remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Currently, the most common cause of perforation is instrumentation of the esophagus, but other conditions such as foreign body, trauma, or spontaneous rupture are possible entities in the clinical practice. Multidetector computed tomography has become the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of this setting of patients because of its capability to depict all the different signs associated with the degrees of wall impairment...
February 2016: Seminars in Ultrasound, CT, and MR
KimMi Whitehead, Yonaira Cortes, Laura Eirmann
OBJECTIVE: To review the human and veterinary literature regarding gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility disorders in respect to pathogenesis, patient risk factors, and treatment options in critically ill dogs and cats. ETIOLOGY: GI dysmotility is a common sequela of critical illness in people and small animals. The most common GI motility disorders in critically ill people and small animals include esophageal dysmotility, delayed gastric emptying, functional intestinal obstruction (ie, ileus), and colonic motility abnormalities...
March 2016: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"