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Mobile app

Michael Bobian, Aron Kandinov, Nour El-Kashlan, Peter F Svider, Adam J Folbe, Ross Mayerhoff, Jean Anderson Eloy, S Naweed Raza
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Despite the increasing role of mobile applications (apps) in patient education, there has been little inquiry evaluating the quality of these resources. Because poor health literacy has been associated with inferior health outcomes, evaluating the quality of patient education materials takes on great importance. Our objective was to employ validated readability tools for the evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) mobile apps. METHODS: GERD-specific apps found in the Apple App Store (Apple Inc...
October 18, 2016: Laryngoscope
C D Hoppe, J E Cade, M Carter
BACKGROUND: Mobile applications (apps) could support diabetes management through dietary, weight and blood glucose self-monitoring, as well as by promoting behaviour change. The present study aimed to evaluate diabetes apps for content, functions and behaviour change techniques (BCTs). METHODS: Diabetes self-management apps for Android smartphones were searched for on the Google Play Store. Ten apps each from the following search terms were included; 'diabetes', 'diabetes type 1', 'diabetes type 2', 'gestational diabetes'...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics: the Official Journal of the British Dietetic Association
Jonas Geuens, Thijs Willem Swinnen, Rene Westhovens, Kurt de Vlam, Luc Geurts, Vero Vanden Abeele
BACKGROUND: Chronic arthritis (CA), an umbrella term for inflammatory rheumatic and other musculoskeletal diseases, is highly prevalent. Effective disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for CA are available, with the exception of osteoarthritis, but require a long-term commitment of patients to comply with the medication regimen and management program as well as a tight follow-up by the treating physician and health professionals. Additionally, patients are advised to participate in physical exercise programs...
October 13, 2016: JMIR MHealth and UHealth
Sabrina Schuck, Natasha Emmerson, Hadar Ziv, Penelope Collins, Sara Arastoo, Mark Warschauer, Francis Crinella, Kimberley Lakes
Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) receive approximately 80% of instruction in the general education classroom, where individualized behavioral management strategies may be difficult for teachers to consistently deliver. Mobile device apps provide promising platforms to manage behavior. This pilot study evaluated the utility of a web-based application (iSelfControl) designed to support classroom behavior management. iSelfControl prompted students every 'Center' (30-minutes) to self-evaluate using a universal token-economy classroom management system focused on compliance, productivity, and positive relationships...
2016: PloS One
Kimberly Plevniak, Matthew Campbell, Timothy Myers, Abby Hodges, Mei He
Clinical diagnosis requiring central facilities and site visits can be burdensome for patients in resource-limited or rural areas. Therefore, development of a low-cost test that utilizes smartphone data collection and transmission would beneficially enable disease self-management and point-of-care (POC) diagnosis. In this paper, we introduce a low-cost iPOC(3D) diagnostic strategy which integrates 3D design and printing of microfluidic POC device with smartphone-based disease diagnosis in one process as a stand-alone system, offering strong adaptability for establishing diagnostic capacity in resource-limited areas and low-income countries...
September 2016: Biomicrofluidics
Sumi Sinha, Elliott D Kozin, Matthew R Naunheim, Samuel R Barber, Kevin Wong, Leanna W Katz, Tiffany M N Otero, Ishmael J M Stefanov-Wagner, Aaron K Remenschneider
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: 1) Determine feasibility of smartphone-based mobile technology to measure noise exposure; and 2) measure noise exposure in exercise spin classes. STUDY DESIGN: Observational Study. METHODS: The SoundMeter Pro app (Faber Acoustical, Salt Lake City, UT) was installed and calibrated on iPhone and iPod devices in an audiology chamber using an external sound level meter to within 2 dBA of accuracy. Recording devices were placed in the bike cupholders of participants attending spin classes in Boston, Massachusetts (n = 17) and used to measure sound level (A-weighted) and noise dosimetry during exercise according to National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) guidelines...
October 12, 2016: Laryngoscope
Jean Christophe Rusatira, Brian Tomaszewski, Vincent Dusabejambo, Vincent Ndayiragije, Snedden Gonsalves, Aishwarya Sawant, Angeline Mumararungu, George Gasana, Etienne Amendezo, Anne Haake, Leon Mutesa
BACKGROUND: Lack of access to health and medical education resources for doctors in the developing world is a serious global health problem. In Rwanda, with a population of 11 million, there is only one medical school, hence a shortage in well-trained medical staff. The growth of interactive health technologies has played a role in the improvement of health care in developed countries and has offered alternative ways to offer continuous medical education while improving patient's care...
June 1, 2016: JMIR Med Educ
Ying-Chieh Liu, Chien-Hung Chen, Chien-Wei Lee, Yu-Sheng Lin, Hsin-Yun Chen, Jou-Yin Yeh, Sherry Yueh-Hsia Chiu
OBJECTIVE: We designed and developed two interactive apps interfaces for dietary food measurements on mobile devices. The user-centered designs of both the IPI (interactive photo interface) and the SBI (sketching-based interface) were evaluated. Four types of outcomes were assessed to evaluate the usability of mobile devices for dietary measurements, including accuracy, absolute weight differences, and the response time to determine the efficacy of food measurements. METHODS: The IPI presented users with images of pre-determined portion sizes of a specific food and allowed users to scan and then select the most representative image matching the food that they were measuring...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Biomedical Informatics
Jessica L Baldwin, Hardeep Singh, Dean F Sittig, Traber Davis Giardina
Widespread use of health information technology (IT) could potentially increase patients' access to their health information and facilitate future goals of advancing patient-centered care. Despite having increased access to their health data, patients do not always understand this information or its implications, and digital health data can be difficult to navigate when displayed in a small-format, complex interface. In this paper, we discuss two forms of patient-facing health IT tools-patient portals and applications (apps)-and highlight how, despite several limitations of each, combining high-yield features of mobile health (mHealth) apps with portals could increase patient engagement and self-management and be more effective than either of them alone...
October 3, 2016: Healthcare
Amelia Barwise, Lisbeth Garcia-Arguello, Yue Dong, Manasi Hulyalkar, Marija Vukoja, Marcus J Schultz, Neill K J Adhikari, Benjamin Bonneton, Oguz Kilickaya, Rahul Kashyap, Ognjen Gajic, Christopher N Schmickl
BACKGROUND: The Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness (CERTAIN) is an international collaborative project with the overall objective of standardizing the approach to the evaluation and treatment of critically ill patients world-wide, in accordance with best-practice principles. One of CERTAIN's key features is clinical decision support providing point-of-care information about common acute illness syndromes, procedures, and medications in an index card format...
October 3, 2016: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
Jolie N Haun, Margeaux Chavez, Kim M Nazi, Nicole Antinori
BACKGROUND: The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has developed various health information technology (HIT) resources to provide accessible veteran-centered health care. Currently, the VA is undergoing a major reorganization of VA HIT to develop a fully integrated system to meet consumer needs. Although extensive system documentation exists for various VA HIT systems, a more centralized and integrated perspective with clear documentation is needed in order to support effective analysis, strategy, planning, and use...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Sanchia Shibasaki, Karen Gardner, Beverly Sibthorpe
BACKGROUND: In Australia, there is growing use of technology supported knowledge translation (KT) strategies such as social media and mobile apps in health promotion and in Indigenous health. However, little is known about how individuals use technologies and the evidence base for the impact of these health interventions on health behavior change is meager. OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to examine how Facebook is used to promote health messages to Indigenous people and discuss how KT can support planning and implementing health messages to ensure chosen strategies are fit for the purpose and achieve impact...
October 5, 2016: JMIR MHealth and UHealth
Paul Rinne, Michael Mace, Tagore Nakornchai, Karl Zimmerman, Susannah Fayer, Pankaj Sharma, Jean-Luc Liardon, Etienne Burdet, Paul Bentley
Motor-training software on tablets or smartphones (Apps) offer a low-cost, widely-available solution to supplement arm physiotherapy after stroke. We assessed the proportions of hemiplegic stroke patients who, with their plegic hand, could meaningfully engage with mobile-gaming devices using a range of standard control-methods, as well as by using a novel wireless grip-controller, adapted for neurodisability. We screened all newly-diagnosed hemiplegic stroke patients presenting to a stroke centre over 6 months...
2016: PloS One
Michael Mackert, Amanda Mabry-Flynn, Sara Champlin, Erin E Donovan, Kathrynn Pounders
BACKGROUND: Approximately one-half of American adults exhibit low health literacy and thus struggle to find and use health information. Low health literacy is associated with negative outcomes including overall poorer health. Health information technology (HIT) makes health information available directly to patients through electronic tools including patient portals, wearable technology, and mobile apps. The direct availability of this information to patients, however, may be complicated by misunderstanding of HIT privacy and information sharing...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Medical Internet Research
N H Chavannes
In a systematic review in the Dutch Journal of Medicine (NTvG), Dallinga et al. look for an answer to the societally relevant question of whether mobile apps are proven to lead to a more active and healthy lifestyle. Decision makers in healthcare have high expectations of eHealth, a field where scientific evidence sometimes seems overruled merely by the opinions of self-declared 'futurists'. Commonly, eHealth is propelled forward as the solution to the lack of manpower in healthcare, given the expected rise of chronic disease...
2016: Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde
J M Dallinga, S E Zwolsman, V T Dekkers, M Baart de la Faille-Deutekom
OBJECTIVE: To present an overview of the literature on the effect of smartphone apps and activity trackers on a healthy lifestyle. DESIGN: Systematic review. METHOD: PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Embase and CINAHL were searched for relevant articles. Inclusion criteria were: (a) the intervention was a mobile app or activity tracker; (b) that stimulated activity and healthy diet; (c) in adults with an unhealthy lifestyle but so far without medical disorders; (d) aimed at preventative healthcare, improvement in health or healthy behaviour; and (e) measured the effect of physical activity, diet and weight...
2016: Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde
Chi Yan Hui, Robert Walton, Brian McKinstry, Tracy Jackson, Richard Parker, Hilary Pinnock
OBJECTIVES: Telehealth is promoted as a strategy to support self-management of long-term conditions. The aim of this systematic review is to identify which information and communication technology features implemented in mobile apps to support asthma self-management are associated with adoption, adherence to usage, and clinical effectiveness. METHODS: We systematically searched 9 databases, scanned reference lists, and undertook manual searches (January 2000 to April 2016)...
October 2, 2016: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
Zhen Shen, Shan Zheng, Rui Dong, Gong Chen
PURPOSE: We aimed to study whether saturation in HSV color model could be a parameter for acholic stool and utilized for designing a mobile application for screening biliary atresia (BA). METHODS: Saturations of the colors in the three validated stool color cards (Taiwan, Japan, Britain) were read using PHOTOSHOP. Stools from 40 BA patients and 40 in-hospital neonates with pneumonia were photographed and analyzed with color-analyzing mobile applications. RESULTS: Saturations of normal colors in the published stool cards were all >50% (67%~99%, median 85%) and were all <50% (7~47%, median 25%) for abnormal colors...
September 16, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Surgery
Mayra Sousa Gomes, Paulo Rogério Ferreti Bonan, Vitor Yuri Nicolau Ferreira, Laudenice de Lucena Pereira, Ricardo João Cruz Correia, Hélder Bruno da Silva Teixeira, Daniel Cláudio Pereira
PURPOSE: To develop a mobile application (app) for oral cancer screening. METHODS: The app was developed using Android system version 4.4.2, with JAVA language. Information concerning sociodemographic data and risk factors for oral cancer development, e.g., tobacco and alcohol use, sun exposure and other contributing factors, such as unprotected oral sex, oral pain and denture use, were included. We surveyed a population at high risk for oral cancer development and then evaluated the sensitivity/specificity/accuracy and predictive values of clinical oral diagnosis between two blinded trained examiners, who used movies and data from the app, and in loco oral examination as gold-standard...
September 20, 2016: Technology and Health Care: Official Journal of the European Society for Engineering and Medicine
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