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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27895600/the-implementation-of-bring-your-own-device-byod-in-primary-elementary-schools
#1
Karen J McLean
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27754160/pl-03-1-hypertension-management-in-the-era-of-digital-information-and-communication-technologies
#2
Steven Steinhubl
Despite having the basic tools necessary to appropriately identify and manage individuals with hypertension for over half a century it remains the single greatest contributing risk factor to morbidity and mortality worldwide today. Since diagnosis and effective treatment availability are not issues, this major failing in care can be attributed to inadequate systems of care: systems that have led to only <20% of hypertensive individuals globally having their blood pressure adequately controlled. Even in the US, where it is one of the most common reasons for a primary care visit, and with over $42...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27643115/pl-03-1-hypertension-management-in-the-era-of-digital-information-and-communication-technologies
#3
Steven Steinhubl
Despite having the basic tools necessary to appropriately identify and manage individuals with hypertension for over half a century it remains the single greatest contributing risk factor to morbidity and mortality worldwide today. Since diagnosis and effective treatment availability are not issues, this major failing in care can be attributed to inadequate systems of care: systems that have led to only <20% of hypertensive individuals globally having their blood pressure adequately controlled. Even in the US, where it is one of the most common reasons for a primary care visit, and with over $42...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27606788/bring-your-own-device-and-nurse-managers-decision-making
#4
Karen Martinez, Elizabeth Borycki, Karen L Courtney
The Bring Your Own Device phenomenon is important in the healthcare environment because this trend is changing the workplace in healthcare organizations, such as British Columbia. At present, there is little research that exists in Canada to provide a distinct understanding of the complexities and difficulties unique to this phenomenon within the nursing practice. This study focused on the experiences and perceptions of nurse managers regarding how they make decisions on the use of personal handheld devices in the workplace...
September 8, 2016: Computers, Informatics, Nursing: CIN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27554824/using-mobile-devices-for-inpatient-rounding-and-handoffs-an-innovative-application-developed-and-rapidly-adopted-by-clinicians-in-a-pediatric-hospital
#5
Aude Motulsky, Jenna Wong, Jean-Pierre Cordeau, Jorge Pomalaza, Jeffrey Barkun, Robyn Tamblyn
OBJECTIVE: To describe the usage of a novel application (The FLOW) that allows mobile devices to be used for rounding and handoffs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The FLOW provides a view of patient data and the capacity to enter short notes via personal mobile devices. It was deployed using a "bring-your-own-device" model in 4 pilot units. Social network analysis (SNA) was applied to audit trails in order to visualize usage patterns. A questionnaire was used to describe user experience...
August 22, 2016: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27332445/distance-education-programs-the-technical-support-to-be-successful
#6
Ryan E McNew, Jeffry S Gordon, Elizabeth E Weiner, Patricia Trangenstein
Academic success requires support on a variety of levels as well as access to contemporary tools and services. Supporting students enrolled in a successful higher education distance learning program, requires a strong, properly trained IT support staff in addition to a stable IT environment. Our distance education program began with a regional market but has grown significantly over the past few years. This is primarily due to the success of our distance education tools and support which have contributed to achieving a ranking of eleventh of best graduate schools in nursing according to the U...
2016: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27332297/the-hygiene-games
#7
Frederic Klein, Cassandra Severijns, Daniela Albiez, Eugen Seljutin, Marko Jovanović, Milad Eyvazi Hesar
Addressing the correlation of hospital acquired infections and insufficient hand hygiene, we propose a supportive system to enhance the individual hygiene habits of health care workers. By applying gamification to incentivize health care professionals while maintaining a high standard of privacy and usability, the system focuses on technical simplicity by using concepts like bring your own device in a scaleable proof of concept implementation.
2016: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27169345/a-mobile-app-development-guideline-for-hospital-settings-maximizing-the-use-of-and-minimizing-the-security-risks-of-bring-your-own-devices-policies
#8
Soleh U Al Ayubi, Alexandra Pelletier, Gajen Sunthara, Nitin Gujral, Vandna Mittal, Fabienne C Bourgeois
BACKGROUND: Hospitals today are introducing new mobile apps to improve patient care and workflow processes. Mobile device adoption by hospitals fits with present day technology behavior; however, requires a deeper look into hospital device policies and the impact on patients, staff, and technology development. Should hospitals spend thousands to millions of dollars to equip all personnel with a mobile device that is only used in a hospital environment? Allowing health care professionals to use personal mobile devices at work, known as bring-your-own-device (BYOD), has the potential to support both the hospital and its employees to deliver effective and efficient care...
May 11, 2016: JMIR MHealth and UHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27096135/feasibility-of-the-bring-your-own-device-model-in-clinical-research-results-from-a-randomized-controlled-pilot-study-of-a-mobile-patient-engagement-tool
#9
Laura Pugliese, Molly Woodriff, Olga Crowley, Vivian Lam, Jeremy Sohn, Scott Bradley
BACKGROUND: Rising rates of smartphone ownership highlight opportunities for improved mobile application usage in clinical trials. While current methods call for device provisioning, the "bring your own device" (BYOD) model permits participants to use personal phones allowing for improved patient engagement and lowered operational costs. However, more evidence is needed to demonstrate the BYOD model's feasibility in research settings. OBJECTIVE: To assess if CentrosHealth, a mobile application designed to support trial compliance, produces different outcomes in medication adherence and application engagement when distributed through study-provisioned devices compared to the BYOD model...
2016: Curēus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26526934/the-feasibility-of-using-bring-your-own-device-byod-technology-for-electronic-data-capture-in-multicentre-medical-audit-and-research
#10
M C Faulds, K Bauchmuller, D Miller, J H Rosser, K Shuker, I Wrench, P Wilson, G H Mills
Large-scale audit and research projects demand robust, efficient systems for accurate data collection, handling and analysis. We utilised a multiplatform 'bring your own device' (BYOD) electronic data collection app to capture observational audit data on theatre efficiency across seven hospital Trusts in South Yorkshire in June-August 2013. None of the participating hospitals had a dedicated information governance policy for bring your own device. Data were collected by 17 investigators for 392 individual theatre lists, capturing 14,148 individual data points, 12, 852 (91%) of which were transmitted to a central database on the day of collection without any loss of data...
January 2016: Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26357771/bring-your-own-device-or-bring-your-own-disruption-how-to-handle-the-mulitude-of-challenges
#11
Jake Hughes
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2015: Health Management Technology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26316287/highlighting-relationships-of-a-smartphone-s-social-ecosystem-in-potentially-large-investigations
#12
Panagiotis Andriotis, George Oikonomou, Theo Tryfonas, Shancang Li
Social media networks are becoming increasingly popular because they can satisfy diverse needs of individuals (both personal and professional). Modern mobile devices are empowered with increased capabilities, taking advantage of the technological progress that makes them smarter than their predecessors. Thus, a smartphone user is not only the phone owner, but also an entity that may have different facets and roles in various social media networks. We believe that these roles can be aggregated in a single social ecosystem, which can be derived by the smartphone...
September 2016: IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26242083/creating-your-practice-s-bring-your-own-device-policy
#13
Lauren Rieders, Marianne Monroy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 25, 2014: Medical Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25905017/a-uk-perspective-on-smartphone-use-amongst-doctors-within-the-surgical-profession
#14
Rikesh K Patel, Adele E Sayers, Nina L Patrick, Kaylie Hughes, Jonathan Armitage, Iain Andrew Hunter
INTRODUCTION: Hospitals are increasingly looking for mobile solutions to meet their information technology needs. Medical professionals are using personal mobile devices to support their work, because of limitations in both time and space. Our aims were to assess smartphone use amongst UK surgical doctors, the prevalence of medical app use and online activity. METHODS: A thirteen-item questionnaire was derived to identify the proportion of surgical doctors of all grades using smartphones within the workplace...
June 2015: Annals of Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25300613/capturing-patient-reported-outcome-pro-data-electronically-the-past-present-and-promise-of-epro-measurement-in-clinical-trials
#15
Stephen Joel Coons, Sonya Eremenco, J Jason Lundy, Paul O'Donohoe, Hannah O'Gorman, William Malizia
Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are an important means of evaluating the treatment benefit of new medical products. It is recognized that PRO measures should be used when assessing concepts best known by the patient or best measured from the patient's perspective. As a result, there is growing emphasis on well defined and reliable PRO measures. In addition, advances in technology have significantly increased electronic PRO (ePRO) data collection capabilities and options in clinical trials. The movement from paper-based to ePRO data capture has enhanced the integrity and accuracy of clinical trial data and is encouraged by regulators...
August 2015: Patient
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25245774/replacing-ambulatory-surgical-follow-up-visits-with-mobile-app-home-monitoring-modeling-cost-effective-scenarios
#16
Kathleen A Armstrong, John L Semple, Peter C Coyte
BACKGROUND: Women's College Hospital (WCH) offers specialized surgical procedures, including ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Most patients receiving ambulatory surgery have low rates of postoperative events necessitating clinic visits. Increasingly, mobile monitoring and follow-up care is used to overcome the distance patients must travel to receive specialized care at a reduced cost to society. WCH has completed a feasibility study using a mobile app (QoC Health Inc, Toronto) that suggests high patient satisfaction and adequate detection of postoperative complications...
2014: Journal of Medical Internet Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25072642/bring-your-own-device-into-problem-based-learning-tutorials
#17
LETTER
John Falconer, Sarah Gray, Kathy Gaul
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2014: Medical Teacher
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24489032/using-tablet-technology-and-instructional-videos-to-enhance-preclinical-dental-laboratory-learning
#18
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Cynthia C Gadbury-Amyot, John H Purk, Brian Joseph Williams, Christopher J Van Ness
The purpose of this pilot study was to examine if tablet technology with accompanying instructional videos enhanced the teaching and learning outcomes in a preclinical dental laboratory setting. Two procedures deemed most challenging in Operative Dentistry II were chosen for the development of instructional videos. A random sample of thirty students was chosen to participate in the pilot. Comparison of faculty evaluations of the procedures between the experimental (tablet) and control (no tablet) groups resulted in no significant differences; however, there was a trend toward fewer failures in the experimental group...
February 2014: Journal of Dental Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24427995/the-risks-of-byod-bring-your-own-device-in-the-workplace
#19
Jodi Schafer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2013: Journal of the Michigan Dental Association
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