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Muscle tear

Gregory R Waryasz, Alan H Daniels, Joseph A Gil, Vladimir Suric, Craig P Eberson
Increasing emphasis on maintaining a healthy lifestyle has led many individuals to seek advice on exercise from personal trainers. There are few studies to date that evaluate personal trainer education, practice trends, and injuries they have seen while training clients. A survey was distributed to personal trainers using Survey Monkey® (Palo Alto, CA, USA) with 605 personal trainers accessing the survey. An exercise related bachelor's degree was held by 64.2% of survey participants and a certification in personal training by 89...
September 19, 2016: Orthopedic Reviews
Stephen J Nicholas, Steven J Lee, Michael J Mullaney, Timothy F Tyler, Takumi Fukunaga, Christopher D Johnson, Malachy P McHugh
BACKGROUND: The functional benefits of double-row (DR) versus single-row (SR) rotator cuff repair are not clearly established. PURPOSE: To examine the effect of DR versus SR rotator cuff repair on functional outcomes and strength recovery in patients with full-thickness tears. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. METHODS: Forty-nine patients were randomized to DR or SR repairs; 36 patients (13 women, 23 men; mean age, 62 ± 7 years; 20 SR, 16 DR) were assessed at a mean 2...
October 2016: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
Kelechi R Okoroha, Nima Mehran, Jonathan Duncan, Travis Washington, Tyler Spiering, Michael J Bey, Marnix Van Holsbeeck, Vasilios Moutzouros
Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are both capable of diagnosing full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, it is unknown which imaging modality is more accurate and precise in evaluating the characteristics of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a surgical population. This study reviewed 114 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear over a 1-year period. Of these patients, 61 had both preoperative MRI and ultrasound for review. Three musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated each ultrasound and MRI in a randomized and blinded fashion on 2 separate occasions...
October 18, 2016: Orthopedics
Mona Alilet, Julien Behr, Jean-Philippe Nueffer, Benoit Barbier-Brion, Sébastien Aubry
: The subscapularis (SSC) muscle is the most powerful of the rotator cuff muscles, and plays an important role in shoulder motion and stabilization. SSC tendon tear is quite uncommon, compared to the supraspinatus (SSP) tendon, and, most of the time, part of a large rupture of the rotator cuff. Various complementary imaging techniques can be used to obtain an accurate diagnosis of SSC tendon lesions, as well as their extension and muscular impact. Pre-operative diagnosis by imaging is a key issue, since a lesion of the SSC tendon impacts on treatment, surgical approach, and post-operative functional prognosis of rotator cuff injuries...
October 17, 2016: Insights Into Imaging
Brady K Huang, Eric Y Chang
OBJECTIVE: To describe infraspinatus tendon injuries with associated intramuscular edema in light of more recently elucidated anatomical knowledge. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective review was performed to identify MRI cases with infraspinatus tendon injury accompanied by muscle edema. MR images were reviewed to evaluate the location of the injury, to assess the degree of tendon retraction, and to assess for muscular changes. Clinical and surgical data were reviewed when available...
October 14, 2016: Skeletal Radiology
Xinning Li, Antonio Cusano, Josef Eichinger
Shoulder dislocations are a common injury, with anterior shoulder dislocation among male patients being the most common presentation. A patient with recurrent shoulder instability, anterior-superior escape, and chronic subscapularis tendon rupture following multiple shoulder stabilization surgeries presents the surgeon with a complex and challenging case. This report describes a 40-year-old man with an extensive left shoulder history that included a failed Latarjet procedure, an irreparable, chronic subscapularis tear with grade 4 Goutallier fatty infiltration, and associated anterior-superior escape...
October 13, 2016: Orthopedics
Sean McIntire, Lee Boujie, John Leasiolagi
Injuries involving rupture of the pectoralis major are relatively rare. When they do occur, it is mostly frequently in a young, athletic man. The most common cause is weight lifting that results in eccentric muscle contraction (muscle contraction against an overbearing force, leading to muscle lengthening)-specifically, the bench press. Other mechanisms for this injury include forceful abduction and external rotation of the arm. Injury can occur anywhere along the pectoralis major from its medial origin on the sternum and clavicle to its lateral tendinous insertion on the humerus...
2016: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
Tarek M Hegazi, Jeffrey A Belair, Eoghan J McCarthy, Johannes B Roedl, William B Morrison
Injuries of the hip and surrounding structures represent a complex and commonly encountered scenario in athletes, with improper diagnosis serving as a cause of delayed return to play or progression to a more serious injury. As such, radiologists play an essential role in guiding management of athletic injuries. Familiarity with hip anatomy and the advantages and limitations of various imaging modalities is of paramount importance for accurate and timely diagnosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is often the modality of choice for evaluating many of the injuries discussed, although preliminary evaluation with conventional radiography and use of other imaging modalities such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography, and bone scintigraphy may be supplementary or preferred in certain situations...
October 2016: Radiographics: a Review Publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
Richard Kijowski, Humberto Rosas, Alexey Samsonov, Kevin King, Rob Peters, Fang Liu
PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility of using compressed sensing (CS) to accelerate three-dimensional fast spin-echo (3D-FSE) imaging of the knee. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 3D-FSE sequence was performed at 3T with CS (CUBE-CS with 3:16-minute scan time) and without CS (CUBE with 4:44-minute scan time) twice on the knees of 10 healthy volunteers to assess signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) using the addition-subtraction method and once on the knees of 50 symptomatic patients to assess diagnostic performance...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging: JMRI
Elizabeth B Gausden, Moira M McCarthy, Andreas Kontaxis, Keith T Corpus, Lawrence V Gulotta, Anne M Kelly
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine the relative amount of load that is transmitted through the superior portion of the subscapularis during activities of daily living as compared with the load that is transmitted through the middle and inferior portions in a normal shoulder and in a shoulder with a supraspinatus tear. METHODS: By use of the Newcastle shoulder model, the subscapularis was modeled with 3 lines of action encircling the humeral head...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Chad M Fortun, Ivan Wong, Joseph P Burns
Failed arthroscopic soft-tissue stabilization and anterior glenoid bone loss have been shown to have high failure rates after standard arthroscopic stabilization techniques. For patients with recurrent glenohumeral instability, the Bristow-Latarjet procedure is currently the standard of care. It is predominantly performed through an open deltopectoral approach but has recently been described arthroscopically. Although providing excellent clinical outcomes, the Bristow-Latarjet procedure violates the subscapularis muscle, has a steep learning curve with a high complication rate, and permanently changes the anterior shoulder anatomy, making any future revision surgery more challenging...
August 2016: Arthroscopy Techniques
M Petri, M Ettinger, S Brand, T Stuebig, C Krettek, M Omar
BACKGROUND: The role of nonoperative management for rotator cuff tears remains a matter of debate. Clinical results reported in the literature mainly consist of level IV studies, oftentimes combining a mixed bag of tear sizes and configurations, and are contradictory to some extent. METHODS: A selective literature search was performed and personal surgical experiences are reported. RESULTS: Most studies show an overall success rate of around 75% for nonoperative treatment...
2016: Open Orthopaedics Journal
Kelsey A Thomas, Michael C Gibbons, John G Lane, Anshuman Singh, Samuel R Ward, Adam J Engler
Full thickness rotator cuff tendon (RCT) tears have long-term effects on RC muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, with lasting damage even after surgical tendon repair. Skeletal muscle progenitor cells (SMPs) are critical for muscle repair in response to injury, but the inability of RC muscles to recover from chronic RCT tear indicates possible deficits in repair mechanisms. Here we investigated if muscle injury state was a crucial factor during human SMP expansion and differentiation ex vivo. SMPs were isolated from muscles in patients with no, partial-thickness (PT), or full-thickness (FT) RCT tears...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic Research: Official Publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
Maxwell C Park
Is a biomechanical cadaveric study to assess the effect of rotator cuff tear size and repair technique on supraspinatus muscle stiffness clinically relevant? A study in this issue compared double-row and knotless transosseous-equivalent repairs, but notably, muscle loading was not simulated. Results showed that the knotless transosseous-equivalent repair for larger tears demonstrated a more uniform stiffness distribution across the supraspinatus muscle compared with the double-row repair. However, given the inherently asymmetrical functional anatomy and morphology of the supraspinatus tendon-muscle unit, when muscle tone exists, the effect of the repair technique on muscle stiffness in vivo may not be determined based on the findings of this study...
October 2016: Arthroscopy: the Journal of Arthroscopic & related Surgery
Joel Narveson, Matthew D Haberl, Patrick J Grabowski
Study Design Case report. Background Intra-articular hip pathologies can be difficult to diagnose, and evidence to guide physical therapy interventions is lacking. The purpose of this report is to describe a clinical pathway for conservative management of a patient with an acute acetabular labral tear (ALT) and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Case Description The patient was an 18-year-old woman with recent onset of right groin pain who underwent intra-articular corticosteroid injection and therapeutic exercise for the management of an acute ALT identified on radiographic imaging...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Fumiaki Takase, Atsuyuki Inui, Yutaka Mifune, Ryosuke Sakata, Tomoyuki Muto, Yoshifumi Harada, Yasuhiro Ueda, Takeshi Kokubu, Masahiro Kurosaka
Atrophy with fatty degeneration is often seen in rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons. PRP has been reported to enhance tissue repair processes after tendon ruptures. However, the effect of PRP on atrophy and fatty degeneration of the muscle is not yet known. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of PRP on degeneration change of rotator cuff muscles in vitro and in vivo. A murine myogenic cell line and a rat rotator cuff tear model were used in this study and PRP was administrated into subacromial space which is widely used in clinical practice...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic Research: Official Publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
Rhiannon Bray, Alex Derpapas, Ruwan Fernando, Vik Khullar, Demetri C Panayi
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The pathophysiology of prolapse is not well understood. However, two main theories predominate: either the fibromuscular layer of the vagina develops a defect/tears away from its supports, or its tissues are stretched and attenuated. The aim of this study was to assess how vaginal wall thickness (VWT) is related to vaginal prolapse. METHODS: The study group comprised 243 women with symptomatic prolapse recruited from the Outpatient Department of a tertiary referral centre for urogynaecology...
September 27, 2016: International Urogynecology Journal
Dominique M Rouleau, G Yves Laflamme, Jennifer Mutch
BACKGROUND: This is a retrospective prognostic study on soft tissue injury following isolated greater tuberosity (GT) fractures of the proximal humerus with respect to the relationship between rotator cuff tears and GT displacement. METHODS: Forty-three patients with isolated GT fractures were recruited and evaluated with a standardized interview and physical examination, quality of life and shoulder function questionnaires (Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, SF-12 Version 2, Constant, Quick-Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand, Visual Analogue Scale), standard shoulder radiographs and an ultrasound...
October 2016: Shoulder & Elbow
Tina Ganderup, Carsten Jensen, Anders Holsgaard-Larsen, Jonas B Thorlund
PURPOSE: To investigate lower extremity muscle strength and functional performance before and after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. We hypothesized that patients would experience deficiencies in the affected leg at 3 months post-surgery, and that this deficiency would be normalized at 12 months following surgery. METHODS: Twenty-three patients (46 ± 6.5 years) meniscectomized in 2012 and 2013 were examined for knee extension, knee flexion, and hip abduction maximal isometric muscle strength (iMVC), rate of force development (RFD200), and knee function (single-leg hop for distance and single-leg knee bends in 30 s...
September 20, 2016: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy: Official Journal of the ESSKA
Jessica M Fritz, Ryan R Inawat, Brooke A Slavens, John R McGuire, Dean W Ziegler, Sergey S Tarima, Steven I Grindel, Gerald F Harris
BACKGROUND: The increasing demand for rotator cuff (RC) repair patients to return to work as soon as they are physically able has led to exploration of when this is feasible. Current guidelines from our orthopedic surgery clinic recommend a return to work at 9 weeks postoperation. To more fully define capacity to return to work, the current study was conducted using a unique series of quantitative tools. To date, no study has combined 3-dimensional (3D) motion analysis with electromyography (EMG) assessment during activities of daily living (ADLs), including desk tasks, and commonly prescribed rehabilitation exercise...
September 14, 2016: PM & R: the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation
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