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cultural competence

Cheng-Chen Pan, Christophe Maïano, Alexandre J S Morin
BACKGROUND: Little research has looked at the associations between sex, weight status and culture, and the physical self-perceptions and body dissatisfaction of individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) involved in Special Olympics (SO) sports. AIMS: To examine sex- (male vs female), weight status- (non-overweight/obese vs. overweight/obese), and culture-based (North American vs. Asian) differences in physical self-concept and body dissatisfaction among SO athletes...
March 12, 2018: Research in Developmental Disabilities
Kenzie A Cameron, Elaine R Cohen, Joelle R Hertz, Diane B Wayne, Debi Mitra, Jeffrey H Barsuk
OBJECTIVES: The aims of the study were to identify perceived barriers and facilitators to central venous catheter (CVC) insertion among healthcare providers and to understand the extent to which an existing Simulation-Based Mastery Learning (SBML) program may address barriers and leverage facilitators. METHODS: Providers participating in a CVC insertion SBML train-the-trainer program, in addition to intensive care unit nurse managers, were purposively sampled from Veterans Administration Medical Centers located in geographically diverse areas...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Patient Safety
Cara R Dunkley, Lori A Brotto
BDSM is an overlapping acronym referring to the practices of Bondage and Discipline, Dominance and Submission, and Sadism and Masochism. This paper reviews the psychological literature on BDSM practitioners, and discusses issues concerning BDSM that are relevant to clinicians and sexual health care providers. The literature concerning the psychological health of BDSM practitioners and clinical issues in treating BDSM practitioners was exhaustively reviewed. BDSM practitioners differ minimally from the general population in terms of psychopathology...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy
Phillip Joy, Matthew Numer
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer people (LGBTQ) have unique concerns regarding their nutritional health while experiencing disparities within the Canadian healthcare system. Dietetic training programs often do not provide adequate knowledge or skills to students to be competent in meeting the needs of this population. Drawing from literature from other health programs, this paper outlines key strategies to the integration of LGBTQ curriculum into dietetic training programs. LGBTQ training can help students gain cultural competencies, knowledge and understanding of the LGBTQ communities, and the nutritional concerns within them...
March 15, 2018: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
Pamela Fergusson, Nicole Greenspan, Lukas Maitland, Rémy Huberdeau
Transgender people are an important group for whom access to healthcare is often problematic. Dietitians need to be aware of key issues in transgender health to provide culturally competent clinical nutritional care. This article serves as a primer, clarifying key terms and concepts, exploring the impact of stigma and discrimination on health and nutrition for people from transgender communities, and offering practical advice for nutritional and other related issues. Education for dietitians both pre- and postqualification is an important part of improving care and building skills and awareness of cultural humility...
March 15, 2018: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
Folakemi T Odedina, R R Reams, E Kaninjing, J Nguyen, B Mochona, D E Lyon, N Askins, L S Behar-Horenstein
With the growing burden of cancer in minority populations and limited progress in eliminating cancer disparities, it has become important to develop a diverse oncology workforce in basic, clinical, and behavioral research who will address cancer disparities and increase the participation of minority populations in clinical trials. To address the lack of well-trained underrepresented minority cancer scientists in Florida, the University of Florida collaborated with Florida A&M University in 2012 to establish the Florida Prostate Cancer Research Training Opportunities for Outstanding Leaders (ReTOOL) Program...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Cancer Education: the Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education
Lin Cao, Jizheng Chen, Yaxin Wang, Yuting Yang, Jie Qing, Zihe Rao, Xinwen Chen, Zhiyong Lou
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. Although several HCV protease/polymerase inhibitors were recently approved by U.S. FDA, the combination of antivirals targeting multiple processes of HCV lifecycle would optimize anti-HCV therapy and against potential drug-resistance. Viral entry is an essential target step for antiviral development, but FDA-approved HCV entry inhibitor remains exclusive. Here we identify serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2A R) is a HCV entry factor amendable to therapeutic intervention by a chemical biology strategy...
March 14, 2018: Protein & Cell
Jennifer L Guthrie, Clare Kong, David Roth, Danielle Jorgensen, Mabel Rodrigues, Patrick Tang, Maichael Thejoe, Kevin Elwood, Victoria J Cook, James Johnston, Jennifer L Gardy
Prospective universal genotyping of tuberculosis (TB) isolates is used by many laboratories to detect clusters of cases and inform contact investigations. Prior to universal genotyping, most TB prevention programs genotyped isolates on request only, relying on requests from public health professionals whose knowledge of a patient's clinical, demographic, and epidemiological characteristics suggested potential transmission. To justify the switch from on-request to universal genotyping - particularly in the public health domain, with its limited resources and competing priorities - it is important to demonstrate the additional benefit provided by a universal genotyping program...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Babatunde Aremu, Pamela D Hill, Joanne M McNeal, Mary A Petersen, Debbie Swanberg, Kathleen R Delaney
Addressing tense and escalating situations with noncoercive measures is an important element of inpatient psychiatric treatment. Although restraint rates are frequently monitored, the use of pro re nata (PRN) intramuscular (IM) injections to address agitation is also an important indicator. In 2015, at the current study site, a significant increase was noted in PRN IM medication use despite unit leadership's efforts to build a culture of trauma-informed care (TIC). The purpose of the current quality improvement project was to educate staff on methods to incorporate TIC into daily practice and the use of brief solution-focused therapy techniques in escalating situations...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services
Aline Veras Morais Brilhante, Marilyn Kay Nations, Ana Maria Fontenelle Catrib
Violence against women is primarily a socially produced issue of gender-hierarchy cultural values. This study aimed to unveil the meanings assigned to sexual violence against women in the forró lyrics by adolescent boys living on the outskirts of Fortaleza, Ceará State, Brazil. Our point of departure was ethnomusicology, the theory of which contends that studies of regional songs and their performances transcend the geographic space in which they are performed, to the extent that they reflect universally disseminated practices in the legitimation of violence...
March 8, 2018: Cadernos de Saúde Pública
Ann Sheridan, Donal O'Keeffe, Barbara Coughlan, Kate Frazer, Johnathan Drennan, Mary Kemple
BACKGROUND: Social opportunities can be limited in the lives of people with enduring mental illness (EMI) due to psychiatric stigma, restricted home environments and employment barriers. Supported socialisation programmes have the potential to redress the impact of social isolation. AIM: To explore the experiences of service users with EMI taking part in a supported socialisation programme, using written diary entries. METHODS: This article reports on the qualitative component of a randomised controlled trial of supported socialisation for people with EMI (published previously in this journal)...
March 1, 2018: International Journal of Social Psychiatry
Ellen A G Chernoff, Kazuna Sato, Hai V N Salfity, Deborah A Sarria, Teri Belecky-Adams
The differentiated state of spinal cord ependymal cells in regeneration-competent amphibians varies between a constitutively active state in what is essentially a developing organism, the tadpole of the frog Xenopus laevis , and a quiescent, activatable state in a slowly growing adult salamander Ambystoma mexicanum , the Axolotl. Ependymal cells are epithelial in intact spinal cord of all vertebrates. After transection, body region ependymal epithelium in both Xenopus and the Axolotl disorganizes for regenerative outgrowth (gap replacement)...
2018: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Krishna Kant, Mohammad-Ali Shahbazi, Vivek Priy Dave, Tien Anh Ngo, Vinayaka Aaydha Chidambara, Quyen Than Linh, Dang Duong Bang, Anders Wolff
Rapid detection of foodborne pathogens at an early stage is imperative for preventing the outbreak of foodborne diseases, known as serious threats to human health. Conventional bacterial culturing methods for foodborne pathogen detection are time consuming, laborious, and with poor pathogen diagnosis competences. This has prompted researchers to call the current status of detection approaches into question and leverage new technologies for superior pathogen sensing outcomes. Novel strategies mainly rely on incorporating all the steps from sample preparation to detection in miniaturized devices for online monitoring of pathogens with high accuracy and sensitivity in a time-saving and cost effective manner...
March 10, 2018: Biotechnology Advances
Deanne Wong, Sebastian Morgan-Lynch
Patient portals enable people to access their health information electronically, but concerns about confidentiality and privacy breaches, particularly for young people, may be impeding portal adoption in New Zealand. This paper considers the legal and ethical framework relating to health information privacy and informed consent in New Zealand, and proposes an approach to implementing patient portals for young people. Shared portal access (where both a young person and their parent or guardian have access to the young person's portal) may be appropriate for young children whose parents or guardians are responsible for their health care...
December 2017: Journal of Primary Health Care
Kevin L Garvin, Ryan E Miller, Todd M Gilbert, Anthony M White, Elizabeth R Lyden
BACKGROUND: Two-stage reimplantation has consistently yielded high rates of success for patients with chronic prosthetic joint infection, although results more than 5 years after reimplantation are not commonly reported. Numerous factors may contribute to the risk of reinfection, although these factors-as well as the at-risk period after reimplantation-are not well characterized. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) What is the risk of reinfection after reimplantation for prosthetic joint infection at a minimum of 5 years? (2) Is the bacteriology of the index infection associated with late reinfection? (3) Is the presence of bacteria at the time of reimplantation associated with late reinfection? METHODS: Between 1995 and 2010, we performed 97 two-stage revisions in 93 patients for prosthetic joint infection of the hip or knee, and all are included in this retrospective study...
February 2018: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
Noortje Kloos, Hester R Trompetter, Ernst T Bohlmeijer, Gerben J Westerhof
Background and Objectives: As proposed by the self-determination theory, satisfying nursing home residents' needs for autonomy, relatedness, and competence may improve their well-being. This is the first study to test the longitudinal relations of the satisfaction of these three basic psychological needs to the subjective well-being of nursing home residents and to determine whether a balance among the satisfaction of the three needs is important for well-being. Research Design and Methods: Participants in this longitudinal survey study included 128 physically frail residents (mean age 85 years) at four Dutch nursing homes...
February 24, 2018: Gerontologist
Ryan M Hulteen, Philip J Morgan, Lisa M Barnett, David F Stodden, David R Lubans
Evidence supports a positive association between competence in fundamental movement skills (e.g., kicking, jumping) and physical activity in young people. Whilst important, fundamental movement skills do not reflect the broad diversity of skills utilized in physical activity pursuits across the lifespan. Debate surrounds the question of what are the most salient skills to be learned which facilitate physical activity participation across the lifespan. In this paper, it is proposed that the term 'fundamental movement skills' be replaced with 'foundational movement skills'...
March 9, 2018: Sports Medicine
Margaret Whelan, Ethel Ulrich, Joan Ginty, Denise Walsh
Nurse practitioner and doctor of nursing practice students gain cultural awareness and primary care experience on biannual medical mission trips to Jamaica. Faith-based Molloy College's partnership with professional medical volunteers enables students to apply clinical skills, express compassion, and gain interprofessional experience. Volunteers provide care and education for the high prevalence of noncommunicable conditions found in Jamaica. The program enjoys a positive relationship with Jamaica's Ministry of Health; a research study will assess impact on students and patients...
April 2018: Journal of Christian Nursing: a Quarterly Publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship
Smita C Banerjee, Chasity B Walters, Jessica M Staley, Koshy Alexander, Patricia A Parker
Delivery of culturally competent care toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients depends on how health-care providers (HCPs) communicate with them; however, research about knowledge, attitude, and behavior of HCPs toward LGBT patients is scant. The objectives of our study were to describe oncology HCPs' knowledge and examine if beliefs about LGB and transgender patients mediate the effects of LGBT health-care knowledge on open communication behaviors with LGB and transgender patients, respectively...
March 9, 2018: Journal of Health Communication
Rami Musharrafieh, Chunlong Ma, Jun Wang
The majority of human influenza A viruses currently in circulation carry the amantadine-resistant AM2-S31N channel mutation. We previously discovered a series of AM2-S31N inhibitors with potent antiviral activity against both oseltamivir-sensitive and -resistant influenza A viruses. To understand the drug-resistance mechanism of AM2-S31N inhibitors, we performed serial viral passage experiments using the influenza virus A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) to select drug-resistant AM2 mutations against two representative AM2-S31N channel blockers (1 and 2)...
March 5, 2018: Antiviral Research
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