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Mojtaba Keshavarz
OBJECTIVE: The exact pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD) is not yet fully understood, and there are many questions in this area which should be answered. This review aims to discuss the roles of glial cells in the pathophysiology of BD and their contribution to the mechanism of action of mood-stabilising drugs. METHODS: We critically reviewed the most recent advances regarding glial cell roles in the pathophysiology and treatment of BD and the neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of these cells...
October 24, 2016: Acta Neuropsychiatrica
Anna Jafarpour, Hugo Spiers
When humans draw maps, or make judgments about travel-time, their responses are rarely accurate and are often systematically distorted. Distortion effects on estimating time to arrival and the scale of sketch-maps reveal the nature of mental representation of time and space. Inspired by data from rodent entorhinal grid cells, we predicted that familiarity to an environment would distort representations of the space by expanding the size of it. We also hypothesized that travel-time estimation would be distorted in the same direction as space-size, if time and space rely on the same cognitive map...
October 22, 2016: Hippocampus
Benjamin Albright, Roni Dhaher, Helen Wang, Roa Harb, Tih-Shih W Lee, Hitten Zaveri, Tore Eid
Loss of glutamine synthetase (GS) in hippocampal astrocytes has been implicated in the causation of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE).However, the mechanism by which the deficiency in GS leads to epilepsy is incompletely understood. Here we ask how hippocampal GS inhibition affects seizure phenotype and neuronal activation during epilepsy development (epileptogenesis). Epileptogenesis was induced by infusing the irreversible GS blocker methionine sulfoximine (MSO) unilaterally into the hippocampal formation of rats...
October 18, 2016: Experimental Neurology
William Severa, Ojas Parekh, Conrad D James, James B Aimone
The dentate gyrus forms a critical link between the entorhinal cortex and CA3 by providing a sparse version of the signal. Concurrent with this increase in sparsity, a widely accepted theory suggests the dentate gyrus performs pattern separation-similar inputs yield decorrelated outputs. Although an active region of study and theory, few logically rigorous arguments detail the dentate gyrus's (DG) coding. We suggest a theoretically tractable, combinatorial model for this action. The model provides formal methods for a highly redundant, arbitrarily sparse, and decorrelated output signal...
October 20, 2016: Neural Computation
Xue-Yuan Li, Wei-Wei Men, Hua Zhu, Jian-Feng Lei, Fu-Xing Zuo, Zhan-Jing Wang, Zhao-Hui Zhu, Xin-Jie Bao, Ren-Zhi Wang
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1) transgenic (Tg) mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using (18)F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr)...
October 18, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Hui Shao, Yang Yang, Ai-Ping Qi, Pian Hong, Guang-Xi Zhu, Xin-Yu Cao, Wei-Gang Ji, Zhi-Ru Zhu
Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is one of the most refractory types of adult epilepsy, and treatment options remain unsatisfactory. Gastrodin (GAS), a phenolic glucoside used in Chinese herbal medicine and derived from Gastrodia elata Blume, has been shown to have remarkable anticonvulsant effects on various models of epilepsy in vivo. However, the mechanisms of GAS as an anticonvulsant drug remain to be established. By utilizing a combination of behavioral surveys, immunofluorescence and electrophysiological recordings, the present study characterized the anticonvulsant effect of GAS in a pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) rat model of TLE and explored the underlying cellular mechanisms...
October 14, 2016: Neurochemical Research
Wei Cheng, Edmund T Rolls, Jiang Qiu, Wei Liu, Yanqing Tang, Chu-Chung Huang, XinFa Wang, Jie Zhang, Wei Lin, Lirong Zheng, JunCai Pu, Shih-Jen Tsai, Albert C Yang, Ching-Po Lin, Fei Wang, Peng Xie, Jianfeng Feng
The first brain-wide voxel-level resting state functional connectivity neuroimaging analysis of depression is reported, with 421 patients with major depressive disorder and 488 control subjects. Resting state functional connectivity between different voxels reflects correlations of activity between those voxels and is a fundamental tool in helping to understand the brain regions with altered connectivity and function in depression. One major circuit with altered functional connectivity involved the medial orbitofrontal cortex Brodmann area 13, which is implicated in reward, and which had reduced functional connectivity in depression with memory systems in the parahippocampal gyrus and medial temporal lobe, especially involving the perirhinal cortex Brodmann area 36 and entorhinal cortex Brodmann area 28...
October 14, 2016: Brain: a Journal of Neurology
Kenneth I Strauss, Kost V Elisevich
BACKGROUND: Epilepsy patients have distinct immune/inflammatory cell profiles and inflammatory mediator levels in the blood. Although the neural origin of inflammatory cells and mediators has been implied, few studies have measured these inflammatory components in the human brain itself. This study examines the brain levels of chemokines (8), cytokines (14), and vascular injury mediators (3) suspected of being altered in epilepsy. METHODS: Soluble protein extracts of fresh frozen resected hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and temporal cortex from 58 medically refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy subjects and 4 nonepileptic neurosurgical subjects were assayed for 25 inflammation-related mediators using ultrasensitive low-density arrays...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neuroinflammation
Philip S J Weston, Jennifer M Nicholas, Manja Lehmann, Natalie S Ryan, Yuying Liang, Kirsty Macpherson, Marc Modat, Martin N Rossor, Jonathan M Schott, Sebastien Ourselin, Nick C Fox
OBJECTIVE: To identify a cortical signature pattern of cortical thinning in familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and assess its utility in detecting and tracking presymptomatic neurodegeneration. METHODS: We recruited 43 FAD mutation carriers-36 PSEN1, 7 APP (20 symptomatic, 23 presymptomatic)-and 42 healthy controls to a longitudinal clinical and MRI study. T1-weighted MRI scans were acquired at baseline in all participants; 55 individuals (33 mutation carriers; 22 controls) had multiple (mean 2...
October 12, 2016: Neurology
Thomas I Talpalar, Adolfo E Talpalar
Hyperbaric environments induce the high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) characterized by hyperexcitability of the central nervous system (CNS) and memory impairment. Human divers and other animals experience the HPNS at pressures beyond 1.1 MPa. High pressure depresses synaptic transmission and alters its dynamics in various animal models. Medial perforant path (MPP) synapses connecting the medial entorhinal cortex with the hippocampal formation are suppressed by 50% at 10.1MPa. Reduction of synaptic inputs is paradoxically associated with enhanced ability of dentate gyrus (DG)' granule cells (GCs) to generate spikes at high pressure...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Amber Sousa, Jesus J Gomar, J Daniel Ragland, Concepcion Conejero-Goldberg, Justin Buthorn, Lynda Keehlisen, Ted E Huey, Jeremy Koppel, Marc L Gordon, Erica Christen, Terry E Goldberg
BACKGROUND: The Relational and Item-Specific Encoding task (RISE) measures episodic memory subcomponents, including item-specific and relational encoding of to-be-remembered stimuli. These memory components are neurobiologically relevant because they may engage distinct subregions of the medial temporal lobe, perirhinal and entorhinal cortices, parahippocampus, and hippocampus. METHODS: A total of 125 participants, including 84 healthy controls (HC), 22 mild cognitive impairment-diagnosed and 19 Alzheimer disease (AD)-diagnosed participants, were administered the RISE and neuropsychological measures...
October 11, 2016: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Stephanie L Leal, Jessica A Noche, Elizabeth A Murray, Michael A Yassa
While aging is generally associated with episodic memory decline, not all older adults exhibit memory loss. Furthermore, emotional memories are not subject to the same extent of forgetting and appear preserved in aging. We conducted high-resolution fMRI during a task involving pattern separation of emotional information in older adults with and without age-related memory impairment (characterized by performance on a word-list learning task: low performers: LP vs. high performers: HP). We found signals consistent with emotional pattern separation in hippocampal dentate (DG)/CA3 in HP but not in LP individuals, suggesting a deficit in emotional pattern separation...
August 25, 2016: Neurobiology of Aging
Elissa C McIntosh, Aaron Jacobson, Nobuko Kemmotsu, Ekarin Pongpipat, Erin Green, Lori Haase, Claire Murphy
Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiovascular and metabolic abnormalities that together may increase the risk of developing cognitive decline and dementia; however, the neural substrate is incompletely understood. We investigated cortical thickness in the medial temporal lobe (MTL), hippocampal volume, as well as relationships among metabolic risk factor burden, structure and memory performance. Path-analytic models were tested to explore the relations between MetS risk factor, structure and memory performance...
October 4, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Jean-Bastien Bott, Céline Héraud, Brigitte Cosquer, Karine Herbeaux, Julien Aubert, Maxime Sartori, Romain Goutagny, Chantal Mathis
: Brain mechanisms compensating for cerebral lesions may mitigate the progression of chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which often precedes AD, is characterized by neuronal loss in the entorhinal cortex (EC). This loss leads to a hippocampal disconnection syndrome that drives clinical progression. The concomitant sprouting of cholinergic terminals in the hippocampus has been proposed to compensate for reduced EC glutamatergic input...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Long Xie, John B Pluta, Sandhitsu R Das, Laura E M Wisse, Hongzhi Wang, Lauren Mancuso, Dasha Kliot, Brian B Avants, Song-Lin Ding, José V Manjón, David A Wolk, Paul A Yushkevich
RATIONALE: The human perirhinal cortex (PRC) plays critical roles in episodic and semantic memory and visual perception. The PRC consists of Brodmann areas 35 and 36 (BA35, BA36). In Alzheimer's disease (AD), BA35 is the first cortical site affected by neurofibrillary tangle pathology, which is closely linked to neural injury in AD. Large anatomical variability, manifested in the form of different cortical folding and branching patterns, makes it difficult to segment the PRC in MRI scans...
October 1, 2016: NeuroImage
Marion Ortner, Lorenzo Pasquini, Martina Barat, Panagiotis Alexopoulos, Timo Grimmer, Stefan Förster, Janine Diehl-Schmid, Alexander Kurz, Hans Förstl, Claus Zimmer, Afra Wohlschläger, Christian Sorg, Henning Peters
Very early Alzheimer's disease (AD) - i.e., AD at stages of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and mild dementia - is characterized by progressive structural and neuropathologic changes, such as atrophy or tangle deposition in medial temporal lobes, including hippocampus and entorhinal cortex and also adjacent amygdala. While progressively disrupted intrinsic connectivity of hippocampus with other brain areas has been demonstrated by many studies, amygdala connectivity was rarely investigated in AD, notwithstanding its known relevance for emotion processing and mood disturbances, which are both important in early AD...
2016: Frontiers in Neurology
Alefiya Dhilla Albers, Josephine Asafu-Adjei, Mary K Delaney, Kathleen E Kelly, Teresa Gomez-Isla, Deborah Blacker, Keith A Johnson, Reisa A Sperling, Bradley T Hyman, Rebecca A Betensky, Lloyd Hastings, Mark W Albers
OBJECTIVE: To relate a novel test of identifying and recalling odor percepts to biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in well-characterized elderly individuals, ranging from cognitively normal to demented. METHODS: 183 participants (cognitively normal: n=70, subjective cognitive concerns: n=74, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): n=29, AD dementia: n=10) were administered novel olfactory tests: the Odor Percept IDentification (OPID) and the Percepts of Odor Episodic Memory (POEM) tests...
October 1, 2016: Annals of Neurology
Bryan D James, Robert S Wilson, Patricia A Boyle, John Q Trojanowski, David A Bennett, Julie A Schneider
Hyperphosphorylated transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43, encoded by TARDBP) proteinopathy has recently been described in ageing and in association with cognitive impairment, especially in the context of Alzheimer's disease pathology. To explore the role of mixed Alzheimer's disease and TDP-43 pathologies in clinical Alzheimer's-type dementia, we performed a comprehensive investigation of TDP-43, mixed pathologies, and clinical Alzheimer's-type dementia in a large cohort of community-dwelling older subjects...
September 30, 2016: Brain: a Journal of Neurology
Petroula Proitsi, Min Kim, Luke Whiley, Andrew Simmons, Martina Sattlecker, Latha Velayudhan, Michelle K Lupton, Hillka Soininen, Iwona Kloszewska, Patrizia Mecocci, Magda Tsolaki, Bruno Vellas, Simon Lovestone, John F Powell, Richard J B Dobson, Cristina Legido-Quigley
INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to (1) replicate previous associations between six blood lipids and Alzheimer's disease (AD) (Proitsi et al 2015) and (2) identify novel associations between lipids, clinical AD diagnosis, disease progression and brain atrophy (left/right hippocampus/entorhinal cortex). METHODS: We performed untargeted lipidomic analysis on 148 AD and 152 elderly control plasma samples and used univariate and multivariate analysis methods...
September 28, 2016: Alzheimer's & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association
Xiaoxue Xu, Feng Guo, Xinze Cai, Jun Yang, Jiuhan Zhao, Dongyu Min, Qianhui Wang, Liying Hao, Jiqun Cai
Excessive excitation or loss of inhibitory neurotransmission has been closely related to epileptic activity. Somatostatin (SST) and Neuropeptide Y (NPY) are members of endogenous neuropeptides which are recognized as important modulator of classical neurotransmitter, distributed abundantly in mammalian central nervous system. Abnormal expression of these two neuropeptides evidenced in some epileptic models highlights the relevance of SST or NPY in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. The tremor rat (TRM) is a genetic epileptic animal model which can manifest tonic convulsions without any external stimuli...
2016: Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis
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