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Omar Santana-Méridas, Azucena González-Coloma, Maria Fe Andrés, Veroniki P Vidali, Moschos G Polissiou, Athanasios C Kimbaris
Essential oils from Greek Mentha species showed different chemical compositions for two populations of M. pulegium, characterized by piperitone and pulegone. M. spicata essential oil was characterized by endocyclic piperitenone epoxide, piperitone epoxide, and carvone. The bioactivities of these essential oils and their components have been tested against insect pests (Leptinotarsa decemlineata, Spodoptera littoralis and Myzus persicae), root-knot nematodes (Meloydogine javanica) and plants (Lactuca sativa, Lolium perenne, Solanum lycopersicum)...
October 21, 2016: Chemistry & Biodiversity
Anurati Saha, Rebecca Rolfe, Simon Carroll, Daniel J Kelly, Paula Murphy
Chondrogenesis in vivo is precisely controlled in time and space. The entire limb skeleton forms from cells at the core of the early limb bud that condense and undergo chondrogenic differentiation. Whether they form stable cartilage at the articular surface of the joint or transient cartilage that progresses to hypertrophy as endochondral bone, replacing the cartilage template of the skeletal rudiment, is spatially controlled over several days in the embryo. Here, we follow the differentiation of cells taken from the early limb bud (embryonic day 11...
October 22, 2016: Cell and Tissue Research
D Saul, J C Ammon, F August
We report the case of a 15-year-old boy with combined fractures of the scaphoid, capitate, and hamate that represents a rare variation of the well-known Fenton's syndrome. Fixation was performed for the unstable fractures of the scaphoid and capitate with the use of cannulated Herbert screws and K‑wires respectively. K‑wires were removed after 6 months, with subsequent physiotherapy. After 6 months, CT confirmed complete consolidation of the two surgically treated carpal fractures and the conservatively treated fracture of the hamate...
October 21, 2016: Der Unfallchirurg
Thomas D Loreng, Elizabeth F Smith
The motile cilium is a complex organelle that is typically comprised of a 9+2 microtubule skeleton; nine doublet microtubules surrounding a pair of central singlet microtubules. Like the doublet microtubules, the central microtubules form a scaffold for the assembly of protein complexes forming an intricate network of interconnected projections. The central microtubules and associated structures are collectively referred to as the central apparatus (CA). Studies using a variety of experimental approaches and model organisms have led to the discovery of a number of highly conserved protein complexes, unprecedented high-resolution views of projection structure, and new insights into regulation of dynein-driven microtubule sliding...
October 21, 2016: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology
Yu-Chen Liu, Jia Su, Xing-De Wu, Zhi-Jun Zhang, Min Fan, Qin-Feng Zhu, Juan He, Xiao-Nian Li, Li-Yan Peng, Xiao Cheng, Qin-Shi Zhao
A series of new Lycopodium alkaloids, namely 1-epi-malycorin A (1), 1-epi-17S-hydroxymalycorin A (2), 6α-hydroxyphlegmariurine A (3), 2S,4R-dihydroxyfawcettimine (4), and 16-hydroxylycodine (5), together with 24 known ones, have been isolated from the club moss Phlegmariurus henryi. The structures of the new compounds were determined by extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR, as well as X-ray crystallographic analysis. Among them, the absolute configurations of 1, 2, and 4 and the structure of 3 were confirmed on the basis of the single-crystal X-ray crystallographic analysis...
October 18, 2016: Fitoterapia
Xiyue Xiong, Haiqin He, Yan Shu, Yuxin Li, Zihui Yang, Yingzhuang Chen, Ming Ma, Bo Chen
A facile, flexible process was developed for the preparation of surface-glycosylated porous monolithic columns via aqueous two-phase graft copolymerization of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) and water-soluble dextran (dextran sulfate). The formation of poly(PEGDA) porous skeletons and surface glycosylation were achieved via a one-step process without pre-modification of the dextran. The synthesis conditions were thoroughly optimized. The optimal monolithic column exhibited a large dry state surface area (greater than 400m(2)/g), and it was evaluated as a hydrophilic liquid chromatography (HILIC) stationary phase...
December 1, 2016: Talanta
Xiaodan Yu, Hiroko Kawakami, Naoyuki Tahara, Merissa Olmer, Shinichi Hayashi, Ryutaro Akiyama, Anindya Bagchi, Martin Lotz, Yasuhiko Kawakami
Increasing evidence supports the idea that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) regulate cartilage maintenance in the adult skeleton. The aim of this study is to obtain insight into the regulation of BMP activities in the adult skeletal system. We analyzed expression of Noggin and Gremlin1, BMP antagonists that are known to regulate embryonic skeletal development, in the adult skeletal system by Noggin-LacZ and Gremlin1-LacZ knockin reporter mouse lines. Both reporters are expressed in the adult skeleton in a largely overlapping manner with some distinct patterns...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic Research: Official Publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
Meng Wang, Ian Tietjen, Min Chen, David E Williams, Julie Daoust, Mark A Brockman, Raymond J Andersen
Eight new sesterterpenoids, alotaketals D (8) and E (9), ansellones D (10), E (11), F (12), and G (13), anvilones A (14), and B (15), have been isolated from extracts of the marine sponge Phorbas sp. collected in Howe Sound British Columbia and their structures have been elucidated by analysis of NMR and MS data. Ansellone F (12) contains a rare 1,2-3,4 bis epoxy decalin substructure. Anvilones A (14) and B (15) have the unprecedented tetracylic anvilane terpenoid carbon skeleton. Using a cell culture model of latent HIV-1 infection, ansellone A (3), alotaketal D (8), and anvilone A (14) were found to induce HIV proviral gene expression similar to a control compound prostratin (1), while the known sesterterpenoid alotaketal C (2), isolated from the same extract, was more potent and gave a stronger response than prostratin (1)...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Organic Chemistry
Giulia R Mosele, Gianfilippo Caggiari, Roberto M Scarpa, Carlo Doria
BACKGROUND: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is among the 10 most common cancers in both men and women. It comprises 2-3% of all malignancies. The most common site for metastasis from RCC is the lung (50% of patients), followed by the skeleton (20% to 50% of patients). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our consecutive series of 63 patients surgically treated for spinal metastases from RCC. The surgical treatment for spinal metastases varied in each patient. Factors influencing the choice of surgery included age, disease status, symptoms, morbidity of the patient, the location, the number of repetitive lesions and the existence of extra-osseous metastases...
October 21, 2016: Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica, the Italian Journal of Urology and Nephrology
Eva Meia Rüegg, Paul Gniadek, Ali Modarressi, Denise Baratti-Mayer, Brigitte Pittet-Cuénod
INTRODUCTION: Reconstruction of facial bone defects in children is challenging. The use of well-vascularized bone is mandatory to obtain stable lasting results. This study reports our experience of facial bone reconstruction using prefabricated vascularized calvarium flaps. METHODS: Retrospective case series of 50 patients who underwent 52 maxillary, malar, and mandibular reconstructions between 1988 and 2014 using prefabricated vascularized calvarium flaps. Forty-nine patients suffered from noma sequels; one patient had craniofacial cleft Tessier 3-11...
September 10, 2016: Journal of Cranio-maxillo-facial Surgery
David J Daegling, Kristian J Carlson, Paul Tafforeau, Darryl J de Ruiter, Lee R Berger
Fossils attributed to Australopithecus sediba are described as having phylogenetic affinities with early Homo to the exclusion of other South African australopiths. With respect to functional anatomy of mastication, one implication of this hypothesis is that A. sediba mandibles should exhibit absolutely and relatively reduced stiffness and strength in comparison to Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus jaws. Examination of cortical bone distribution in the MH 1 and MH 2 mandibles of A. sediba (evaluated against samples of Pan, early and modern Homo as well as A...
November 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
Terrence B Ritzman, Claire E Terhune, Philipp Gunz, Chris A Robinson
The fossils from Malapa cave, South Africa, attributed to Australopithecus sediba, include two partial skeletons-MH1, a subadult, and MH2, an adult. Previous research noted differences in the mandibular rami of these individuals. This study tests three hypotheses that could explain these differences. The first two state that the differences are due to ontogenetic variation and sexual dimorphism, respectively. The third hypothesis, which is relevant to arguments suggesting that MH1 belongs in the genus Australopithecus and MH2 in Homo, is that the differences are due to the two individuals representing more than one taxon...
November 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
Narcis Avarvari, Thomas Biet, Kévin Martin, Jihane Hankache, Nora Hellou, Andreas Hauser, Thomas Bürgi, Nicolas Vanthuyne, Tal Aharon, Marco Caricato, Jeanne Crassous
Introduction of heterocycles in the helical skeleton of helicenes allows modulation of their redox, chiroptical and photophysical properties. Herein, we describe the straightforward preparation and structural characterization by single crystal X-ray diffraction of thiadiazole-[7]helicene, which has been resolved into (M) and (P) enantiomers by chiral HPLC, together with its S-shaped double [4]helicene isomer, as well as the smaller congeners thiadiazole-[5]helicene and benzothiadiazole-anthracene. A copper(II) complex with two thiadiazole-[5]helicene ligands has been structurally characterized and it shows the presence of both (M) and (P) isomers coordinated to the metal centre...
October 20, 2016: Chemistry: a European Journal
Stephen F Poropat, Philip D Mannion, Paul Upchurch, Scott A Hocknull, Benjamin P Kear, Martin Kundrát, Travis R Tischler, Trish Sloan, George H K Sinapius, Judy A Elliott, David A Elliott
Australian dinosaurs have played a rare but controversial role in the debate surrounding the effect of Gondwanan break-up on Cretaceous dinosaur distribution. Major spatiotemporal gaps in the Gondwanan Cretaceous fossil record, coupled with taxon incompleteness, have hindered research on this effect, especially in Australia. Here we report on two new sauropod specimens from the early Late Cretaceous of Queensland, Australia, that have important implications for Cretaceous dinosaur palaeobiogeography. Savannasaurus elliottorum gen...
October 20, 2016: Scientific Reports
Ai Phing Lim, Zufarzaana Zulkeflee, Ahmad Zaharin Aris
Dead calcareous skeletons (CSs) as low-cost adsorbents were studied to remove lead ions (Pb (II)) in an aqueous solution. Factors influencing the efficiency of CSs were evaluated by adsorbent size, contact time, initial concentration, dosage concentration and pH. The optimum CS size for removal of Pb (II) was 710 μm at an equilibrium time of 720 min. The best dosage of CS was 10 g/L for a 99% removal efficiency without pH adjustment. Pb (II) ions were effectively removed in the initial pH of the metal solution...
October 2016: Water Science and Technology: a Journal of the International Association on Water Pollution Research
Yuma Hakoda, Masatoshi Aoyagi, Ken-Ichi Irisawa, Shin-Ichiro Kato, Yosuke Nakamura, Minoru Yamaji
Phenanthrenes substituted with trimethylsilylethynyl and phenylethynyl groups were photochemically prepared, and their photophysical properties were systematically investigated based on measurements of fluorescence quantum yields, lifetimes, and transient absorption. Introducing ethynyl groups into the phenanthrene skeleton caused an increase in the fluorescence quantum yields compared to that of phenanthrene. The quantum yields and rates of fluorescence were dependent on the substituting position(s) and the terminating group for the C-C triple bond...
October 20, 2016: Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences
Li Ju, Zhiwen Zhou, Bo Jiang, Yue Lou, Zhiqun Zhang
Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure increases the incidence and severity of skeletal diseases, but little is known about the mechanisms that mediate this relationship. We exposed zebrafish embryos to PCB1254 and assessed the changes in bone morphology protein receptor II (BMPRII), which is involved in bone formation and embryonic development, miRNA-21, for which BMPRII is a known target, and calcium metabolism. PCB1254 upregulated the expression of miR-21 and suppressed BMPRII expression. The inhibition of miR-21 reversed the downregulation of BMPRII and alleviated the PCB1254-induced loss of calcium...
October 19, 2016: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
Florent Elefteriou
The bone marrow microenvironment is characterized by its multicellular nature, and perhaps less obviously by the high mobility of multiple transient and stationary cell lineages present in this environment. The trafficking of hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells between the bone marrow and blood compartments is regulated by a number of bone marrow-derived factors. It is suspected that transformed metastatic cells "hijack" these processes to engraft into the skeleton and eventually cause the skeletal complications associated with metastatic disease...
September 2016: Journal of Bone Oncology
Eugenio Zoni, Gabri van der Pluijm
The skeleton represents a common site of metastases for osteotropic cancers such as prostate and breast tumors and novel therapeutic targets and new markers for the monitoring of bone lesions are urgently needed. The formation of bone metastases is a complex process that starts at the level of the confined tumor and that is characterized by a dynamic crosstalk between the primary cancer and the future metastatic site, the bone. Factors released by the primary tumor contribute to prepare a fertile "soil", where a "pre-metastatic niche" is established prior to future colonization by cancer cells...
September 2016: Journal of Bone Oncology
François Le Pape, Geoffrey Vargas, Philippe Clézardin
Breast cancer frequently metastasises to the skeleton, interfering with the normal bone remodelling process and inducing bone degradation. Bone degradation is caused by osteoclasts, the normal bone-resorbing cells. Osteoclast-mediated bone degradation subsequently leads to the release of bone-derived factors that promote skeletal tumour growth. Osteoclasts themselves stimulate tumour growth. This Review describes the molecular mechanisms through which osteoclasts and breast cancer cells collaborate with each other, triggering the formation of osteolytic bone metastasis...
September 2016: Journal of Bone Oncology
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