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Synchrony, music

Melissa Ellamil, Joshua Berson, Jen Wong, Louis Buckley, Daniel S Margulies
Previous research on interpersonal synchrony has mainly investigated small groups in isolated laboratory settings, which may not fully reflect the complex and dynamic interactions of real-life social situations. The present study expands on this by examining group synchrony across a large number of individuals in a naturalistic environment. Smartphone acceleration measures were recorded from participants during a music set in a dance club and assessed to identify how group movement synchrony covaried with various features of the music...
2016: PloS One
Bronwyn Tarr, Jacques Launay, Robin I M Dunbar
Moving in synchrony leads to cooperative behaviour and feelings of social closeness, and dance (involving synchronisation to others and music) may cause social bonding, possibly as a consequence of released endorphins. This study uses an experimental paradigm to determine which aspects of synchrony in dance are associated with changes in pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin release) and social bonding between strangers. Those who danced in synchrony experienced elevated pain thresholds, whereas those in the partial and asynchrony conditions experienced no analgesic effects...
September 2016: Evolution and Human Behavior: Official Journal of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society
Akito Miura, Shinya Fujii, Masahiro Okano, Kazutoshi Kudo, Kimitaka Nakazawa
The coordination of body movements to a musical beat is a common feature of many dance styles. However, the auditory-motor coordination skills of dancers remain largely uninvestigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the auditory-motor coordination skills of non-dancers, street dancers, and the winner of a celebrated international street dance competition, while coordinating their rhythmic finger movements to a beat. The beat rate of a metronome increased from 1.0 to 3.7 Hz. The participants were asked to either flex or extend their index fingers on the beat in each condition...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Lorraine Chuen, Michael Schutz
An observer's inference that multimodal signals originate from a common underlying source facilitates cross-modal binding. This 'unity assumption' causes asynchronous auditory and visual speech streams to seem simultaneous (Vatakis & Spence, Perception & Psychophysics, 69(5), 744-756, 2007). Subsequent tests of non-speech stimuli such as musical and impact events found no evidence for the unity assumption, suggesting the effect is speech-specific (Vatakis & Spence, Acta Psychologica, 127(1), 12-23, 2008). However, the role of amplitude envelope (the changes in energy of a sound over time) was not previously appreciated within this paradigm...
July 2016: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
Alwina Stein, Robert Wunderlich, Pia Lau, Alva Engell, Andreas Wollbrink, Alex Shaykevich, Jörg-Tobias Kuhn, Heinz Holling, Claudia Rudack, Christo Pantev
BACKGROUND: Tinnitus is a result of hyper-activity/hyper-synchrony of auditory neurons coding the tinnitus frequency, which has developed due to synchronous mass activity owing to the lack of inhibition. We assume that removal of exactly these frequencies from a complex auditory stimulus will cause the brain to reorganize around tonotopic regions coding the tinnitus frequency through inhibition-induced plasticity. Based on this assumption, a novel treatment for tonal tinnitus--tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT)--has been introduced and was tested in this clinical trial...
2016: BMC Neurology
Matthew H Woolhouse, Dan Tidhar, Ian Cross
We report an experiment investigating whether dancing to the same music enhances recall of person-related memory targets. The experiment used 40 dancers (all of whom were unaware of the experiment's aim), two-channel silent-disco radio headphones, a marked-up dance floor, two types of music, and memory targets (sash colors and symbols). In each trial, 10 dancers wore radio headphones and one of four different colored sashes, half of which carried cat symbols. Using silent-disco technology, one type of music was surreptitiously transmitted to half the dancers, while music at a different tempo was transmitted to the remaining dancers...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Anna Zamm, Chelsea Wellman, Caroline Palmer
Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination...
May 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
Paulo Barraza, Mario Chavez, Eugenio Rodríguez
Similar to linguistic stimuli, music can also prime the meaning of a subsequent word. However, it is so far unknown what is the brain dynamics underlying the semantic priming effect induced by music, and its relation to language. To elucidate these issues, we compare the brain oscillatory response to visual words that have been semantically primed either by a musical excerpt or by an auditory sentence. We found that semantic violation between music-word pairs triggers a classical ERP N400, and induces a sustained increase of long-distance theta phase synchrony, along with a transient increase of local gamma activity...
January 2016: Brain and Language
Yen-Hsuan Yang
BACKGROUND: Responsive parenting style and synchronous parent-child interactions have a positive impact on children in terms of language, cognitive, and social-emotional development. Despite widely documented benefits of music therapy on parent-child interactions, empirical evidence for the effects of music therapy on parent-child synchrony is lacking. OBJECTIVE: To examine effects of parent-child dyads' participation in a six-week home-based music therapy program on parent response, child initiation, and parent-child synchrony, as well as parents' daily use of musical activities with their child...
2016: Journal of Music Therapy
Edward W Large, Jorge A Herrera, Marc J Velasco
Entrainment of cortical rhythms to acoustic rhythms has been hypothesized to be the neural correlate of pulse and meter perception in music. Dynamic attending theory first proposed synchronization of endogenous perceptual rhythms nearly 40 years ago, but only recently has the pivotal role of neural synchrony been demonstrated. Significant progress has since been made in understanding the role of neural oscillations and the neural structures that support synchronized responses to musical rhythm. Synchronized neural activity has been observed in auditory and motor networks, and has been linked with attentional allocation and movement coordination...
2015: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
Bronwyn Tarr, Jacques Launay, Emma Cohen, Robin Dunbar
Group dancing is a ubiquitous human activity that involves exertive synchronized movement to music. It is hypothesized to play a role in social bonding, potentially via the release of endorphins, which are analgesic and reward-inducing, and have been implicated in primate social bonding. We used a 2 × 2 experimental design to examine effects of exertion and synchrony on bonding. Both demonstrated significant independent positive effects on pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin activation) and in-group bonding...
October 2015: Biology Letters
David A Alter, Mary O'Sullivan, Paul I Oh, Donald A Redelmeier, Susan Marzolini, Richard Liu, Mary Forhan, Michael Silver, Jack M Goodman, Lee R Bartel
BACKGROUND: Preference-based tempo-pace synchronized music has been shown to reduce perceived physical activity exertion and improve exercise performance. The extent to which such strategies can improve adherence to physical activity remains unknown. The objective of the study is to explore the feasibility and efficacy of tempo-pace synchronized preference-based music audio-playlists on adherence to physical activity among cardiovascular disease patients participating in a cardiac rehabilitation...
2015: Sports Medicine—Open
Sarah A Gerson, Andrea Schiavio, Renee Timmers, Sabine Hunnius
In the current study, we examined the role of active experience on sensitivity to multisensory synchrony in six-month-old infants in a musical context. In the first of two experiments, we trained infants to produce a novel multimodal effect (i.e., a drum beat) and assessed the effects of this training, relative to no training, on their later perception of the synchrony between audio and visual presentation of the drumming action. In a second experiment, we then contrasted this active experience with the observation of drumming in order to test whether observation of the audiovisual effect was as effective for sensitivity to multimodal synchrony as active experience...
2015: PloS One
Ragnhild Eg, Dawn M Behne
In well-controlled laboratory experiments, researchers have found that humans can perceive delays between auditory and visual signals as short as 20 ms. Conversely, other experiments have shown that humans can tolerate audiovisual asynchrony that exceeds 200 ms. This seeming contradiction in human temporal sensitivity can be attributed to a number of factors such as experimental approaches and precedence of the asynchronous signals, along with the nature, duration, location, complexity and repetitiveness of the audiovisual stimuli, and even individual differences...
2015: Frontiers in Psychology
Christos I Ioannou, Ernesto Pereda, Job P Lindsen, Joydeep Bhattacharya
The presentation of two sinusoidal tones, one to each ear, with a slight frequency mismatch yields an auditory illusion of a beating frequency equal to the frequency difference between the two tones; this is known as binaural beat (BB). The effect of brief BB stimulation on scalp EEG is not conclusively demonstrated. Further, no studies have examined the impact of musical training associated with BB stimulation, yet musicians' brains are often associated with enhanced auditory processing. In this study, we analysed EEG brain responses from two groups, musicians and non-musicians, when stimulated by short presentation (1 min) of binaural beats with beat frequency varying from 1 Hz to 48 Hz...
2015: PloS One
Tomoyo Shiramatsu Isoguchi, Hirokazu Takahashi
Natural sounds have a variety of sound spectra, which produce the so-called textures of sounds. These sound textures are extracted and perceived through interactions of the auditory, emotional, and cognitive systems in our brain. Recent studies have investigated how our brain handles musical sound textures, such as consonant and dissonant chords, or major and minor scales. Accumulating evidence indicates that the mammal auditory system has adapted to extract the harmonic structure of sounds and that this adaptation plays crucial roles in the perception of the consonance of two-tone chords...
June 2015: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
Wiebke Trost, Sascha Frühholz, Tom Cochrane, Yann Cojan, Patrik Vuilleumier
To study emotional reactions to music, it is important to consider the temporal dynamics of both affective responses and underlying brain activity. Here, we investigated emotions induced by music using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a data-driven approach based on intersubject correlations (ISC). This method allowed us to identify moments in the music that produced similar brain activity (i.e. synchrony) among listeners under relatively natural listening conditions. Continuous ratings of subjective pleasantness and arousal elicited by the music were also obtained for the music outside of the scanner...
December 2015: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Benoît G Bardy, Charles P Hoffmann, Bart Moens, Marc Leman, Simone Dalla Bella
In humans and other animals, the locomotor and respiratory systems are coupled together through mechanical, neurophysiological, and informational interactions. At a macroscopic observer-environment level, these three types of interactions produce locomotor-respiratory coupling (LRC), whose dynamics are evaluated in this paper. A formal analysis of LRC is presented, exploiting tools from synchronization theories and nonlinear dynamics. The results of two recent studies, in which participants were instructed to cycle or exhale at a natural frequency or in synchrony with an external rhythmic sound, are discussed...
March 2015: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Laurel J Trainor, Laura Cirelli
Adults who engage in synchronous movement to music later report liking each other better, remembering more about each other, trusting each other more, and are more likely to cooperate with each other compared to adults who engage in asynchronous movements. Although poor motor coordination limits infants' ability to entrain to a musical beat, they perceive metrical structure in auditory rhythm patterns, their movements are affected by the tempo of music they hear, and if they are bounced by an adult to a rhythm pattern, the manner of this bouncing can affect their auditory interpretation of the meter of that pattern...
March 2015: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Sandra E Trehub, Judith Becker, Iain Morley
Musical behaviours are universal across human populations and, at the same time, highly diverse in their structures, roles and cultural interpretations. Although laboratory studies of isolated listeners and music-makers have yielded important insights into sensorimotor and cognitive skills and their neural underpinnings, they have revealed little about the broader significance of music for individuals, peer groups and communities. This review presents a sampling of musical forms and coordinated musical activity across cultures, with the aim of highlighting key similarities and differences...
March 19, 2015: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
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