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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28300714/biomarkers-and-immunotherapeutic-targets-in-glioblastoma
#1
REVIEW
Alice L Hung, Tomas Garzon-Muvdi, Michael Lim
Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive central nervous system (CNS) cancer with poor prognosis despite maximal therapy. The recent advent of immunotherapy holds great promise for improving GBM survival and has already made great strides towards changing current management strategies. A diverse set of biomarkers has been implicated as immunotherapeutic targets and prognostic indicators in other cancers. Some of the more extensively studied examples include cytokines (IL-4, IL-13, and TGF-ß), checkpoint molecules (PD-1, CTLA-4, TIM-3, LAG-3, CD137, GITR, OX40), and growth/angiogenesis proteins (endoglin and EGFR)...
March 11, 2017: World Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28298544/can-consideration-of-the-microbiome-improve-antimicrobial-utilization-and-treatment-outcomes-in-the-oncology-patient
#2
Jessica R Galloway-Pena, Robert R Jenq, Samuel A Shelburne
The need to provide effective and timely antimicrobial treatment to cancer patients with infections is well-recognized, but tempered by preliminary, but accumulating, evidence that antibiotic-induced microbiome dysbiosis affects cancer therapy response, non-infectious toxicities, and infectious complications. Given only a minority of empirically treated cancer patients are proven to have a true bacterial infection, it is important to consider the potential negative consequences of extensive broad-spectrum antimicrobial use on the commensal microbiota...
March 15, 2017: Clinical Cancer Research: An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28292977/the-host-microbiome-regulates-and-maintains-human-health-a-primer-and-perspective-for-non-microbiologists
#3
REVIEW
Sunil Thomas, Jacques Izard, Emily Walsh, Kristen Batich, Pakawat Chongsathidkiet, Gerard Clarke, David A Sela, Alexander J Muller, James M Mullin, Korin Albert, John P Gilligan, Katherine DiGuilio, Rima Dilbarova, Walker Alexander, George C Prendergast
Humans consider themselves discrete autonomous organisms, but recent research is rapidly strengthening the appreciation that associated microorganisms make essential contributions to human health and well being. Each person is inhabited and also surrounded by his/her own signature microbial cloud. A low diversity of microorganisms is associated with a plethora of diseases, including allergy, diabetes, obesity, arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, and even neuropsychiatric disorders. Thus, an interaction of microorganisms with the host immune system is required for a healthy body...
March 14, 2017: Cancer Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28286571/we-are-not-alone-a-case-for-the-human-microbiome-in-extra-intestinal-diseases
#4
EDITORIAL
S Shivaji
BACKGROUND: "Dysbiosis" in the gut microbiome has been implicated in auto-immune diseases, in inflammatory diseases, in some cancers and mental disorders. The challenge is to unravel the cellular and molecular basis of dysbiosis so as to understand the disease manifestation. MAIN BODY: Next generation sequencing and genome enabled technologies have led to the establishment of the composition of gut microbiomes and established that "dysbiosis" is the cause of several diseases...
2017: Gut Pathogens
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28278350/the-role-of-the-vaginal-microbiome-in-gynecological-cancer-a-review
#5
REVIEW
Miriam Champer, Alexandra M Wong, Jackson Champer, Ilana L Brito, Philipp W Messer, June Y Hou, Jason D Wright
Human microbiome research has shown commensal bacteria to be a major factor in both wellness and disease pathogenesis. Interest in the microbiome has recently expanded beyond the gut to include a multitude of other organ systems for which the microbiome may have health implications. Here, we review the role of the vaginal microbiome in health and disease, with a particular focus on gynecologic malignancies. Further, we suggest that it may be possible to expand the use of probiotics in the treatment of gynecologic cancers...
March 9, 2017: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28275685/the-clinical-evidence-linking-helicobacter-pylori-to-gastric-cancer
#6
REVIEW
Steven F Moss
Gastric cancer has long been recognized to be accompanied and preceded by chronic gastritis, lasting decades. Arguably, the most important development in our understanding of gastric cancer pathogenesis over the past 50 years has been the realization that, for most cases of gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori is the cause of the underlying gastritis. Gastritis can promote gastric carcinogenesis, typically via the Correa cascade of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia. Nested case-control studies have shown that H pylori infection increases the risk of gastric cancer significantly, both of the intestinal and diffuse subtypes, and that H pylori is responsible for approximately 90% of the world's burden of noncardia gastric cancer...
March 2017: Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257583/the-oral-cavity-microbiota-between-health-oral-disease-and-cancers-of-the-aerodigestive-tract
#7
Pierre Le Bars, Sebastien Metamoros, Emmanuel Montassier, Françoise Le Vacon, Gilles Potel, Assem Soueidan, Fabienne Jordana, Marie-France De La Cochétière
Many studies show that the human microbiome plays a critical role in the chronic pathologies of obesity, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diabetes. More recently, the interaction between cancer and the microbiome has been highlighted. Most studies have focused on the gut microbiota because it represents the most extensive bacterial community, and the body of evidence correlating it with gut syndromes is increasing. However, in the strict sense, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract begins in the oral cavity, and special attention should be paid to the specific flora of this cavity...
March 3, 2017: Canadian Journal of Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28245856/characterization-of-oral-and-gut-microbiome-temporal-variability-in-hospitalized-cancer-patients
#8
Jessica R Galloway-Peña, Daniel P Smith, Pranoti Sahasrabhojane, W Duncan Wadsworth, Bryan M Fellman, Nadim J Ajami, Elizabeth J Shpall, Naval Daver, Michele Guindani, Joseph F Petrosino, Dimitrios P Kontoyiannis, Samuel A Shelburne
BACKGROUND: Understanding longitudinal variability of the microbiome in ill patients is critical to moving microbiome-based measurements and therapeutics into clinical practice. However, the vast majority of data regarding microbiome stability are derived from healthy subjects. Herein, we sought to determine intra-patient temporal microbiota variability, the factors driving such variability, and its clinical impact in an extensive longitudinal cohort of hospitalized cancer patients during chemotherapy...
February 28, 2017: Genome Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28240774/early-detection-of-pancreatic-cancer-where-are-we-now-and-where-are-we-going
#9
REVIEW
Bin Zhou, Jian-Wei Xu, Yu-Gang Cheng, Jing-Yue Gao, San-Yuan Hu, Lei Wang, Han-Xiang Zhan
Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal malignancies. Recent studies indicate that patients with incidentally diagnosed PC have better prognosis than those with symptoms and that there is a sufficient window for early detection. However, effective early diagnosis remains difficult and depends mainly on imaging modalities and the development of screening methodologies with highly sensitive and specific biomarkers. This review summarizes recent advances in effective screening for early diagnosis of PC using imaging modalities and novel molecular biomarkers discovered from various "omics" studies including genomics, epigenomics, non-coding RNA, metabonomics, liquid biopsy (CTC, ctDNA and exosomes) and microbiomes, and their use in body fluids (feces, urine, and saliva)...
February 27, 2017: International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28240004/gut-microbiota-and-pancreatic-diseases
#10
Marianna Signoretti, Roberta Roggiolani, Caterina Stornello, Gianfranco Delle Fave, Gabriele Capurso
Changes in diet, lifestyle and exposition to environmental risk factors account for the increased incidence of pancreatic disorders, including acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. The role of the microbiome in the development of pancreatic disorders is increasingly recognized. The translocation of gut bacteria and endotoxins following gut barrier failure is a key event contributing to the severity of acute pancreatitis, while small intestine bacterial overgrowth is common in patients with chronic pancreatitis and further worsens their symptoms and malnutrition...
February 24, 2017: Minerva Gastroenterologica e Dietologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28225785/betel-nut-chewing-oral-premalignant-lesions-and-the-oral-microbiome
#11
Brenda Y Hernandez, Xuemei Zhu, Marc T Goodman, Robert Gatewood, Paul Mendiola, Katrina Quinata, Yvette C Paulino
Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220297/what-roles-do-colon-stem-cells-and-gap-junctions-play-in-the-left-and-right-location-of-origin-of-colorectal-cancers
#12
James E Trosko, Heinz-Josef Lenz
This "Commentary" examines an important clinical observation that right-sided colorectal cancers appear less treatable than the left-sided cancers. The concepts of (a) the "initiation/promotion/progression" process, (b) the stem cell hypothesis, (c) the role gap junctional intercellular communication, (d) cancer cells lacking GJIC either because of the non-expression of connexin genes or of non-functional gap junction proteins, and (e) the role of the microbiome in promoting initiated colon stem cells to divide symmetrically or asymmetrically are examined to find an explanation...
February 20, 2017: Journal of Cell Communication and Signaling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28219830/gut-microbiome-based-medical-methodologies-for-early-stage-disease-prevention
#13
REVIEW
Jing-Zhang Wang, Wen-Tao Du, Yan-Li Xu, Shu-Zhen Cheng, Zhi-Jun Liu
Recent advancements highlight the important role of gut microbiome in human health. However, a variety of endogenous and exogenous factors, such as genes, foods, drugs, environmental pollutions, oxidative stress, etc., may interfere with the gut microbiome in vivo and increase risks of digestive system diseases, cardiovascular diseases, neurological diseases, obesity, diabetes, cancers, and so on. Abundant discoveries listed in this work support that changes in the composition of the gut microbiome may be potentially used as sensitive early-stage diagnostic biomarkers and that the gut microbiome could be a promising therapeutic target for systemic prevention of multiple human diseases...
February 20, 2017: Microbial Pathogenesis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28217698/questions-and-challenges-associated-with-studying-the-microbiome-of-the-urinary-tract
#14
REVIEW
Yige Bao, Kait F Al, Ryan M Chanyi, Samantha Whiteside, Malcom Dewar, Hassan Razvi, Gregor Reid, Jeremy P Burton
Urologists are typically faced with clinical situations for which the microbiome may have been a contributing factor. Clinicians have a good understanding regarding the role of bacteria related to issues such as antibiotic resistance; however, they generally have a limited grasp of how the microbiome may relate to urological issues. The largest part of the human microbiome is situated in the gastrointestinal tract, and though this is mostly separated from the urinary system, bacterial dissemination and metabolic output by this community is thought to have a significant influence on urological conditions...
January 2017: Annals of Translational Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28217695/gut-microbiome-and-chronic-prostatitis-chronic-pelvic-pain-syndrome
#15
REVIEW
Hans C Arora, Charis Eng, Daniel A Shoskes
Analysis of the human microbiome continues to reveal new and previously unrealized associations between microbial dysbiosis and disease. Novel approaches to bacterial identification using culture-independent methods allow practitioners to discern the presence of alterations in the taxa and diversity of the microbiome and identify correlations with disease processes. While some of these diseases that have been extensively studied are well-defined in their etiology and treatment methods (colorectal cancer), others have provided much more significant challenges in both diagnosis and treatment...
January 2017: Annals of Translational Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28178947/an-integrative-bayesian-dirichlet-multinomial-regression-model-for-the-analysis-of-taxonomic-abundances-in-microbiome-data
#16
W Duncan Wadsworth, Raffaele Argiento, Michele Guindani, Jessica Galloway-Pena, Samuel A Shelbourne, Marina Vannucci
BACKGROUND: The Human Microbiome has been variously associated with the immune-regulatory mechanisms involved in the prevention or development of many non-infectious human diseases such as autoimmunity, allergy and cancer. Integrative approaches which aim at associating the composition of the human microbiome with other available information, such as clinical covariates and environmental predictors, are paramount to develop a more complete understanding of the role of microbiome in disease development...
February 8, 2017: BMC Bioinformatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28174737/metagenomic-characterization-of-microbial-communities-in-situ-within-the-deeper-layers-of-the-ileum-in-crohn-s-disease
#17
Chandra Sekhar Pedamallu, Ami S Bhatt, Susan Bullman, Sharyle Fowler, Samuel S Freeman, Jacqueline Durand, Joonil Jung, Fujiko Duke, Veronica Manzo, Diana Cai, Ashwin Ananthakrishnan, Akinyemi I Ojesina, Aruna Ramachandran, Dirk Gevers, Ramnik J Xavier, Atul K Bhan, Matthew Meyerson, Vijay Yajnik
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Microbial dysbiosis and aberrant host-microbe interactions in the gut are believed to contribute to the development and progression of Crohn's disease (CD). Microbiome studies in CD typically have focused on microbiota in feces or superficial mucosal layers of the colon because accessing DNA from deeper layers of the bowel is challenging. In this study, we analyzed the deep tissue microbiome in patients who underwent surgical resection of the small intestine. METHODS: Paraffin blocks were obtained from 12 CD patients undergoing ileocecal resection, and healthy ileum samples (inflammatory bowel disease-free controls) were obtained from 12 patients undergoing surgery for right-sided colon cancer...
September 2016: Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28173873/microbiomic-differences-in-tumor-and-paired-normal-tissue-in-head-and-neck-squamous-cell-carcinomas
#18
Hannah Wang, Pauline Funchain, Gurkan Bebek, Jessica Altemus, Huan Zhang, Farshad Niazi, Charissa Peterson, Walter T Lee, Brian B Burkey, Charis Eng
BACKGROUND: While the role of the gut microbiome in inflammation and colorectal cancers has received much recent attention, there are few data to support an association between the oral microbiome and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Prior investigations have been limited to comparisons of microbiota obtained from surface swabs of the oral cavity. This study aims to identify microbiomic differences in paired tumor and non-tumor tissue samples in a large group of 121 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and correlate these differences with clinical-pathologic features...
February 7, 2017: Genome Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28164846/the-esophageal-and-gastric-microbiome-in-health-and-disease
#19
REVIEW
Richard H Hunt, Mohammad Yaghoobi
The esophagus and stomach are host to their own population of bacteria, which differs in health and disease. Helicobacter pylori uniquely colonizes only gastric mucosa, but an increasing number of bacteria is now isolated from the gastric juice and gastric mucosa, including Lactobacillus. The presence of H pylori alters populations of other gastric bacteria with a marked reduction in diversity. Alterations in intragastric acidity may be the cause or the consequence of changes in the microbial populations of the stomach...
March 2017: Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28147375/fecal-microbiota-transplantation-in-inflammatory-bowel-disease
#20
REVIEW
Walter Reinisch
The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown, but it is thought to arise from an aberrant immune response to a change in colonic environment in a genetically susceptible individual. The intestinal microbiota are located at the complex interface of the epithelial barrier and are sensitive to changes in environmental factors, such as diets, drugs or smoking and signals derived from the intestinal immune system and the gut-brain axis. In patients with IBD, an imbalance in the structural and/or functional configuration of the intestinal microbiota leading to the disruption of the host-microorganism homeostasis (dysbiosis) has been reproducibly reported...
2017: Digestive Diseases
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