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Cardiac Guidelines

Jill Cox, Loretta Kaes, Miguel Martinez, Daniel Moles
Skin temperature may help prospectively determine whether an area of skin discoloration will evolve into necrosis. A prospective, observational study was conducted in 7 skilled nursing facilities to determine if skin temperature measured using infrared thermography could predict the progression of discolored intact skin (blanchable erythema, Stage 1 pressure ulcer, or sus- pected deep tissue injury [sDTI]) to necrosis and to evaluate if nurses could effectively integrate thermography into the clinical setting...
October 2016: Ostomy/wound Management
Walter H Reinhart
The hematocrit (Hct) determines the oxygen carrying capacity of blood, but also increases blood viscosity and thus flow resistance. From this dual role the concept of an optimum Hct for tissue oxygenation has been derived. Viscometric studies using the ratio Hct/blood viscosity at high shear rate showed an optimum Hct of 50-60% for red blood cell (RBC) suspensions in plasma. For the perfusion of an artificial microvascular network with 5-70μm channels the optimum Hct was 60-70% for high driving pressures. With lower shear rates or driving pressures the optimum Hct shifted towards lower values...
October 21, 2016: Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation
Kai-Che Wei, Kuo-Chung Yang, Lee-Wei Chen, Wen-Chung Liu, Wen-Chieh Chen, Wen-Yen Chiou, Ping-Chin Lai
With increasing use of cardiac fluoroscopic intervention, the incidence of fluoroscopy-induced radiation ulcer is increasing. Radiation ulcer is difficult to manage and currently there are no treatment guidelines. To identify the optimal treatment approaches for managing cardiac fluoroscopy-induced radiation ulcers, we retrospectively reviewed medical records of 13 patients with fluoroscopy-induced radiation ulcers receiving surgical interventions and following up in our hospital from 2012 to 2015. Conventional wound care and hyperbaric oxygen therapy were of little therapeutic benefit...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
Kanchi Muralidhar, Deepak Tempe, Yatin Mehta, Poonam Malhotra Kapoor, Chirojit Mukherjee, Thomas Koshy, Prabhat Tewari, Naman Shastri, Satyajeet Misra, Kumar Belani
During current medical care, perioperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has become a vital component of patient management, especially in cardiac operating rooms and in critical care medicine. Information derived from echocardiography has an important bearing on the patient's outcome. The Indian Association of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Anaesthesiologists (IACTA) has promoted the use of TEE during routine clinical care of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. An important mission of IACTA is to oversee training and certify anesthesiologists in the perioperative and intensive care use of TEE...
October 2016: Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia
Poonam Malhotra Kapoor, Kanchi Muralidhar, Navin C Nanda, Yatin Mehta, Naman Shastry, Kalpana Irpachi, Aditya Baloria
In 1980, Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE) first technology has introduced the standard of practice for most cardiac operating rooms to facilitate surgical decision making. Transoesophageal echocardiography as a diagnostic tool is now an integral part of intraoperative monitoring practice of cardiac anaesthesiology. Practice guidelines for perioperative transesophageal echocardiography are systematically developed recommendations that assist in the management of surgical patients, were developed by Indian Association of Cardiac Anaesthesiologists (IACTA)...
October 2016: Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia
R C Oey, H R van Buuren, R A de Man
Accumulation of fluid in the peritoneal cavity - ascites - is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Ascites can originate from hepatic, malignant, cardiac, renal, and infectious diseases. This review discusses the current recommended diagnostic approach towards the patient with ascites and summarises future diagnostic targets.
October 2016: Netherlands Journal of Medicine
Saif Al-Najafi, Frank Sanchez, Stamatios Lerakis
Transcatheter valve interventions have emerged as one of the most important developments in structural heart disease over the past 20 years. Initially, these interventions were directed at patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk; however, their applications have extended to involve other native valves' pathologies, degenerated prosthetic valves, as well as patients of lower surgical risk. In this article, we discuss the importance of cardiac imaging in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) by exploring the current practices, guidelines, and recommendations with the supporting data...
December 2016: Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine
Ali Pourdjabbar, Benjamin Hibbert, Aun-Yeong Chong, Michel R Le May, Marino Labinaz, Trevor Simard, F Daniel Ramirez, Peter Lugomirski, Ronnen Maze, Michael Froeschl, Christopher Glover, Alexander Dick, Jean-Francois Marquis, Jordan Bernick, George Wells, Derek Y F So
Ticagrelor has been endorsed by guidelines as the P2Y12 inhibitor of choice in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Clinically, some patients on ticagrelor will require a switch to clopidogrel; however, the optimal strategy and pharmacodynamics effects of switching remain unknown. Patients with an indication to switch were randomly assigned to either a bolus arm (Clopidogrel 600 mg bolus followed by 75 mg daily, n=30) or a no-bolus arm (Clopidogrel 75 mg daily, n=30). Blood samples were collected at baseline, 12, 24, 48, 54, 60 and 72 hours (h) for assessment of platelet reactivity...
October 20, 2016: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
Evangelos Giannitsis, Hugo A Katus
BACKGROUND: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is associated with high all-cause and PE-related mortality and requires individualized management. After confirmation of PE, a refined risk stratification is particularly warranted among normotensive patients. Previous prognostic models favored combinations of echocardiography or computed tomography suggestive of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction together with biomarkers of RV dysfunction (natriuretic peptides) or myocardial injury (cardiac troponins) to identify candidates for thrombolysis or embolectomy...
October 19, 2016: Clinical Chemistry
Joseph E Cruz, Zachariah Thomas, David Lee, David M Moskowitz, Jeff Nemeth
BACKGROUND: Generic price inflation has resulted in rising acquisition costs for sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an agent historically described as the drug of choice for the treatment of perioperative hypertension in cardiac surgery. PURPOSE: To describe the implementation and cost avoidance achieved by utilizing clevidipine as an alternative to SNP in cardiac surgery patients at a 520-bed community teaching hospital that performs more than 300 cardiac surgeries each year...
October 2016: P & T: a Peer-reviewed Journal for Formulary Management
Ömer Erküner, Roy Claessen, Ron Pisters, Germaine Schulmer, Roos Ramaekers, Laura Sonneveld, Elton Dudink, Theo Lankveld, Ione Limantoro, Bob Weijs, Laurent Pison, Yuri Blaauw, Cees B de Vos, Harry Jgm Crijns
BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing elective electrical cardioversion (ECV) for atrial fibrillation have a temporarily increased risk of thromboembolism. Current guidelines recommend adequate anticoagulation for ≥3 consecutive weeks precardioversion, i.e. consecutive INR values 2.0-3.0 in patients with vitamin K antagonists (VKA). We aimed to evaluate the occurrence and impact of subtherapeutic INRs precardioversion and to study factors associated with these unwanted fluctuations. METHODS: We recruited 346 consecutive patients undergoing elective ECV in the Maastricht University Medical Centre between 2008 and 2013...
October 11, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
Shannon Jordan, Justin Karcher, Rebecca Rogers, Kathleen Kennedy, Anne Lawrence, Jenny Adams
PURPOSE: Updated cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and return-to-work guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) now include specificity of training for industrial athletes (exercise training that involves the muscle groups, movements, and energy systems that these patients use during occupational tasks). However, many CR facilities do not apply this principle, relying instead on the traditional protocol that consists primarily of aerobic exercise. This study was conducted to measure the metabolic cost of typical farming tasks and to compare 2 methods of calculating training intensities...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention
Sven Reek
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator has been available for over a decade. In recent years, the device has been prescribed increasingly for a wide range of indications. The purpose of this review is to describe the technical and clinical aspects of the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator. The available literature on safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness is reviewed, and indications for use will be discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator has been used successfully in more than 100 000 patients for a variety of indications...
October 15, 2016: Current Opinion in Cardiology
Michael J Murray, Heidi DeBlock, Brian Erstad, Anthony Gray, Judi Jacobi, Che Jordan, William McGee, Claire McManus, Maureen Meade, Sean Nix, Andrew Patterson, M Karen Sands, Richard Pino, Ann Tescher, Richard Arbour, Bram Rochwerg, Catherine Friederich Murray, Sangeeta Mehta
OBJECTIVE: To update the 2002 version of "Clinical practice guidelines for sustained neuromuscular blockade in the adult critically ill patient." DESIGN: A Task Force comprising 17 members of the Society of Critical Medicine with particular expertise in the use of neuromuscular-blocking agents; a Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation expert; and a medical writer met via teleconference and three face-to-face meetings and communicated via e-mail to examine the evidence and develop these practice guidelines...
November 2016: Critical Care Medicine
Courtney N Gleason, Deanna L Kerkhof, Elizabeth A Cilia, Maria A Lanyi, Jonathan Finnoff, Dai Sugimoto, Gianmichel D Corrado
OBJECTIVE: The traditional history and physical (H&P) is a poor screening modality to identify athletes at risk for sudden cardiac death. Although better than H&P alone, electrocardiograms (ECG) have also been found to have high false-positive rates. A limited portable ECG by a frontline physician (PEFP) performed during preparticipation physical examination (PPE) allows for direct measurements of the heart to more accurately identify athletes with structural abnormalities. Therefore, it is worthwhile to assess the feasibility of incorporating limited PEFP as part of PPEs...
October 13, 2016: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
John W Pickering, Jaimi H Greenslade, Louise Cullen, Dylan Flaws, William Parsonage, Sally Aldous, Peter George, Andrew Worster, Peter A Kavsak, Martin P Than
BACKGROUND: -The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) new guidelines to rule-in and rule-out acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the emergency department (ED) include a rapid assessment algorithm based on high-sensitivity cardiac troponin and sampling at zero and one hour. ED physicians require very high sensitivity to confidently rule-out AMI, while cardiologists aim to minimise false positive results. METHODS: -High-sensitivity troponin I (hs-cTnI) and T (hs-cTnT) assays were used to measure troponin concentrations in patients presenting with chest-pain symptoms and being investigated for possible acute coronary syndrome at hospitals in New Zealand, Australia and Canada...
October 17, 2016: Circulation
Allan S Jaffe, Harvey D White
High sensitivity cardiac troponin (hscTn) assays are used everywhere except in the United States.(1) One potential advantage of these assays is the ability to triage patients with possible ischemia more rapidly and, there is an understandable desire to find easy, facile algorithms to do this. This was the approach taken with hscTn in the evaluation of patients with possible acute myocardial infarction (AMI) using an algorithm developed by the Advantageous Predictors of Acute Coronary Syndromes Evaluation (APACE) trial...
October 17, 2016: Circulation
Guido Grassi
The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in the USA, allocated 9361 hypertensive patients (mean age 68 years) to two systolic blood pressure treatment targets (either < 120mmHg or < 140mmHg). Although SPRINT intended to enrol hypertensive patients at high cardiovascular risk, it specifically excluded patients with diabetes mellitus or prior stroke. SPRINT was stopped earlier than planned, after a mean follow-up of 3.26 years, on the recommendation of its data and safety monitoring board, and data were published on 9 November 2015...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Enrico Agabiti Rosei
Current Hypertension Guidelines emphasize the importance of assessing the presence of preclinical organ damage. In fact, an extensive evaluation of organ damage may increase the number of patients classified at high CV risk and therefore strongly influence the clinical management of patients. Hypertensive heart disease remains to date the form of organ damage for which there is the greatest amount of evidence of a strong independent prognostic significance. In the presence of a chronic pressure overload, a parallel addition of sarcomers takes place with an increase in myocyte width, which in turn increases left ventricular wall thickness; myocyte hypertrophy is also associated with apoptosis, collagen deposition and ventricular fibrosis with an impairment of coronary hemodynamics as well, thus profoundly influencing functional properties of the left (and right) ventricle...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
ByungSu Yoo
Hypertension is the most common risk factor for systolic and diastolic heart failure. Based on population-attributable risks, hypertension has the greatest impact on the development of heart failure, accounting for 39% of HF events in men and 59% in women. Higher blood pressure, longer duration of hypertension and older age are associated with higher incidence of heart failure however, long term control of hypertension reduces the risk of heart failure. Thus current guideline pointed the hypertension as the single most important modifiable risk factor for heart failure...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
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